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4

Prior to JDK 8u40, default and static interface methods were not supported by JDI (Java Debugger Interface), JDWP (Java Debugger Wire Protocol) and JDB (the standard Java debugger). This is bug JDK-8042123, which is recorded as fixed in 8u40 and a corresponding blurb appears in the 8u40 release notes. Update to 8u40 or later to fix this issue, at least on ...


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I suppose it's a bug in IntelliJ IDEA. In Eclipse both expressions are evaluated to primitive values as expected.


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I've reconstructed your problem with the following piece of code: static void Main(string[] args) { try { Console.WriteLine("Foo"); Environment.FailFast("WOHO!"); } finally { } } When running this under the debugger, I didn't see any exceptions registered either. Running this without the debugger (Ctrl + F5) makes the ...


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Environment.FailFast(string) exits the application immediately, without allowing any catch statements or finalizers to be run on the object. You should only use this method if your application's state is at a point where it can never be recovered, and exiting the application is the only way to ensure something far worse than crashing does not happen. In ...


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If I understand properly, phpdbg_break is a function provided by the interpreter, and not by any extension. Instead of using the built-in PHP server, you should use the phpdbg server, and simulate a web request. See http://phpdbg.com/docs/mocking-webserver for information on how to mock the request and http://phpdbg.com/docs/simples to know how to run the ...


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Put the function prototype void sort(int N); outside main() You don't have (but you may) execute clrscr() before fflush(stdin). In this case contents of your screen (which you want to clear) have nothing to do with stdin. You can read more about fflush() and the motivation to use it, here.


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I assume that you get a compilation error. It is caused by the line above the one where you see the error. As suggested by @Catalyst, it is caused here by the line void sort(int N); /* Function declaration */` because C does not allow functions to be declared locally inside other functions (and main is a function). You can simply fix it that way : ...


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I believe what you are looking for are Visualizers as long as you are using Visual Studio. This website has a nice tutorial on them.


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As you state in your question: ... "garbage" is data that is just whatever happens to be at a particular memory address, that you have access to because of something like forgetting to initialize a variable. This implies that something else used to be in that memory before you got to use it for your variable. Whatever used to be there may or may not ...


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Of course memory is never garbage, unless you make a conscious effort. After all, you are on a deterministic machine, even if it doesn't always seem like it. (Of course, if you interprete arbitrary bytes as text then it's unlikely that you see yourself as ASCII art, although you would deserve it.) That was the reason for one of the worst bugs in history, ...


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First, note that the standard actually contains functions that will help with things like this. There's a useful count-if function that can take a predicate and count how many elements in a list satisfy it. For your case, you could do: CL-USER> (count-if #'(lambda (x) (> x 5)) (list 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7)) ;=> ...



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