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0

You can simply use the %g formatting option: deltaValueS.text = String(format:"∆ é %g",deltaValue) For 4.0 this will give "∆ é 4" For 4.133 this will give "∆ é 4.123"


-1

Do you want something like this? let numberA: Float = 1.234 let numberB: Float = 7.000 func getStringFromNumber(number: Float) -> String { if number - Float(Int(number)) == 0 { return String("\(Int(number))") } else { return String("\(number)") } } print(getStringFromNumber(numberA)) // console output: 1.234 print(...


1

You do not get the expected result because when you run a.set(round(self.entry, 2)) inside initialize() , the value of self.entry.get() is always 0 (the default value after creation) You rather need to attach a callback to a button widget on which, after pressing, the behavior you are looking for will be executed: import Tkinter as Tk root = Tk.Tk() ...


0

I suppose what you want is not to round the float value itself, you want to show a float value with a precision of n decimal points. Try this: >>> n = 2 >>> '{:.{}f}'.format( 3.1415926535, n ) '3.14' >>> n = 3 >>> '{:.{}f}'.format( 3.1415926535, n ) '3.142' Note: in your code you try to round self.entry .i. e. you try ...


2

You should check out number_format function. It will solve your problem. Try this: echo number_format(12345.90, 2, '.', ','); // Prints 12,345.90


2

You’re right to be worried, which is why you should store numbers in storage in their raw, numeric format, and not as a formatted string. Calculations should be performed on numeric values, and not values gained from reverse-engineering string representations. So, store the number in a DECIMAL (or, even better, store the value in cents in an INT column), ...


1

I'll add one more approach to this. number = 16.6666666; console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2))); "16.67" number = 16.6; console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2))); "16.6" number = 16; console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2))); "16" .toFixed(2) returns a string with exactily 2 decimal points, that may or may not be trailing zeros. Doing a parseFloat(...


0

Just replace '.' with ',' in the UI end import java.text.DecimalFormat; public MyClass{ private String netAmount; private static DecimalFormat twoDecimalForm = new DecimalFormat("00.00"); public MyClass(double amount){ //converting to required decimal format in constructor or/and setter this.amount=twoDecimalForm.format(amount);...



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