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26

It isn't required. It is an optimization, a hint to the compiler that the DLL is going to export the function pointer directly rather than just an entry in the IAT of the DLL. The exported function pointer for a function named foo() will be __imp_foo. Which allows it to generate better code, saving a function pointer load from the IAT and an indirect ...


19

__declspec is a Microsoft-specific attribute that allows you to specify storage-class information. (Nitpicker's Corner: However, a number of other compiler vendors—e.g. GCC—now support this language extension for compatibility with the installed base of code that was written targeting Microsoft's compilers. Some even provide additional storage-class ...


6

You don't need the wrapping quotes. The following is legit: #define DLL extern "C" __declspec(dllexport)


5

It's not a macro so it doesn't "expand" to anything. It merely decorates the type with a given UUID in the object file metadata, which can then be extracted later with the __uuidof operator.


5

You could use the COM Automation SAFEARRAY type, even without doing full COM (no object, no class, no interface, no TLB, no registry, etc.), just with DLL exports, as .NET supports it natively with P/Invoke, something like this: C++: extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) LPSAFEARRAY ListDevices(); LPSAFEARRAY ListDevices() { std::vector<std::string> ...


4

Yes. A __declspec is part of the storage class and applies to all declarators in the declaration.


3

The size of the object is used to calculate offsets in arrays and when you use pointers, so sizeof(x) must always be a multiple of the alignment value. In this case, 1 x 32. But if you have __declspec(align(32)) struct aType {int a[12]; };, then the size would be 2 x 32 = 64, since sizeof(a) is 12 x 4 = 48. If we change it to align to 4, 8 or 16, it would be ...


3

I believe (but am not 100% certain) the correct syntax is: CMyClass __declspec(nothrow) & operator= ( IN UInt32 nValue ) It seems that the compiler follows the same rule for function declarations as it does for simple declarations, and the & (or *) goes after the declspec. This matches some of the MSDN documentation. The __declspec keywords ...


3

You can also use templates (traits), if you need to statically "attach" a guid to the interface. Consider: In a common h-file you create an empty unspecialized template: template<typename TInterface> struct TInterfaceTraits {} When defining your interface, write a template specialization for it (or you can write it in any other place including just ...


3

Don't declare as cdecl. The calling convention of 32-bit COM methods is the one that C refers to as stdcall, aliases CALLBACK and WINAPI. See if Delphi has an equivalent one. If Delphi supports COM, it has one. Also, make sure that the C interface does not derive from IUnknown - practically all COM interfaces do. if it is, derive your interface from the ...


3

A function like that is normally going to be inlined. I can't imagine why you would want to force a cross-module (indirection and fix-ups) function call instead. But I counsel against exporting classes, since it creates tight coupling between the two DLLs, which is a real maintenance headache later.


3

You'd normally apply __declspec(dllexport) to the class declaration so the whole shebang gets exported. Doing it one member at the time is tiresome and troublesome. No idea why you'd skip the overload. If you made it public in the class then why not expose it from the DLL as well. If you don't then somebody is going to have a very hard to diagnose linker ...


3

If you declare them as __declspec(thread) where they were previously global, then you have changed the meaning of the program, as well as its performance characteristics. When the variable was a global there was a single copy that each thread referred to. As a thread local, each separate thread has its own variable and changes to that thread local variable ...


2

And the answer is: you need to profile the application, and measure where the most time is being spent. If it turns out to be in functions that often reference the TLS data, then "maybe" could be the answer. It's generally very hard to pick out the reasons for bad performance even in code you've written yourself: doing it remotely in a program described in ...


2

The standard form is noexcept, but VC++ 2008 and 2010 don't support this. Personally, I'd use a macro, defined as throw() (or maybe even nothing) until compilers start supporting C++11 noexcept, and then change it.


2

__declspec(dllimport) is a storage-class specifier that tells the compiler that a function or object or data type is defined in an external DLL. The function or object or data type is exported from a DLL with a corresponding __declspec(dllexport).


2

This is Microsoft Visual C++ extension to C++, to aid COM programming. __declspec(uuid()) associates GUID structure with a class, and __uuidof yields GUID value of a given type/expression.


2

You have two "standard" ways to get from C++ to C#. The first is C++/CLI. In this case you will build a C++/CLI library that takes the std::vector<std::string> and converting that into a System::vector<System::string>. Then you can use it freely as a System.String[] in C#. The other is COM. There you create a COM interface that returns a ...


2

This looks like something that is used at compile time. So there is no way to pass a dynamic value.


2

In Delphi, all classes derive from TObject whether you specify it or not. That means the following Delphi declaration: type ISomeInterface = class function SomeBoolMethod: BOOL; cdecl; virtual; abstract; end; Is the same as this: type ISomeInterface = class(TObject) function SomeBoolMethod: BOOL; cdecl; virtual; abstract; end; That ...


2

You can't do it directly - you need an extra level of indirection. For a C-style compatible interface you'll need to return a primitive type. Forget about using C++ DLLs from any other compiler - there is no strict C++ ABI. So, you'd need to return a opaque pointer to an allocated string vector, e.g. #define MYAPI __declspec(dllexport) extern "C" { ...


1

The first thing to note, which is not actually part of your question but which might help explain for someone reading this, is that the algorithms can take either a function pointer or a function object as an argument. A function pointer is just that - a pointer to a function which expects to take a specific set of parameters and return a specific type. A ...


1

delete this declaration: extern "C" int __stdcall newMain(); and call ADSInterface::newMain() from _tmain. In the posted code you did not define anything matching that declaration, did you? Alternatively make the implementation calling the other one, or drag the one from namespace to global.


1

When you pass a Test by value from one place to another in the "consuming code", you'll cause slicing to occur because the client code is unaware of the variable and calculates an incorrect size for the class Test. To solve this problem, you should declare the variable in the client code as well, or alternatively you can provide a static factory function of ...


1

It means that the definition of the function is in a dynamic library. Refer to the documentation for more details and examples.


1

You are using __declspec(dllexport) inside a class? You either export global functions from the dll or whole class which may contain any functions. You don't have to export selected member functions from a class, I don't even know how that works. It is a little strange that you are not properly exporting the SerialPort class from dll (as per your code) ...


1

__declspec(uuid attached an UUID to class definition so that compiler could apply it somewhere else in code when it is requested by __uuidof operator. That is, if you are porting to Delphi, you might be able basically omit this specification from the class. As for interfaces, when you declare an interface with Delphi you definitely have a chance to provide ...


1

That should do it. If this is the whole code, check the following: 1) You are actually checking the correct dll. Look at the timestamp. Double-check the location and the name. 2) You are compiling the specified cpp (I take it your definition is in the cpp file). Just because the file is in the directory doesn't mean it gets compiled, make sure it is added ...



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