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65

Since it is an expression that comma is simply the comma operator (meaning the type is the type of the rhs side: void), not another argument. That code is using SFINAE - it's enabled if t.reserve(n) exists but it wants to keep the return type as void.


56

result_of was introduced in Boost, and then included in TR1, and finally in C++0x. Therefore result_of has an advantage that is backward-compatible (with a suitable library). decltype is an entirely new thing in C++0x, does not restrict only to return type of a function, and is a language feature. Anyway, on gcc 4.5, result_of is implemented in terms of ...


37

You don't need that- remember that since decltype doesn't evaluate its argument, you can just call on nullptr. decltype(((T*)nullptr)->foo()) footype;


31

You cannot use a lambda expression except by actually creating that object- that makes it impossible to pass to type deduction like decltype. Ironically, of course, the lambda return rules make it so that you CAN return lambdas from lambdas, as there are some situations in which the return type doesn't have to be specified. You only have two choices- ...


29

Just above that example, it says if e is an unparenthesized id-expression or a class member access (5.2.5), decltype(e) is the type of the entity named by e. if e is an lvalue, decltype(e) is T&, where T is the type of e; I think decltype(a->x) is an example of the "class member access" and decltype((a->x)) is an example of lvalue.


29

[Note: Originally, this was not meant to be a self-answered question; I just happened to find the answer myself while I was describing my attempts to investigate, and I thought it would have been nice to share it.] According to Annex C (2.14.5) of the C++11 Standard: The type of a string literal is changed from “array of char” to “array of const char.” ...


26

Return type forwarding in generic code For non-generic code, like the initial example you gave, you can manually select to get a reference as a return type: auto const& Example(int const& i) { return i; } but in generic code you want to be able to perfectly forward a return type without knowing whether you are dealing with a reference or a ...


24

decltype also considers whether the expression is rvalue or lvalue . Wikipedia says, The type denoted by decltype can be different from the type deduced by auto. #include <vector> int main() { const std::vector<int> v(1); auto a = v[0]; // a has type int decltype(v[0]) b = 1; // b has type const int&, the return type ...


23

Yes, of course: typedef decltype(&A::foo) PFN_FOO; Proof here You can also define type alias via using keyword (Thanks to Matthieu M.): using PFN_FOO = decltype(&A::foo);


20

I think the problem is that the variadic function template is only considered declared after you specified its return type so that sum in decltype can never refer to the variadic function template itself. But I'm not sure whether this is a GCC bug or C++0x simply doesn't allow this. My guess is that C++0x doesn't allow a "recursive" call in the ...


20

Your suspicions are incorrect. void f() { } Now deduce(&f) has type void, but with your rewrite, it has type void(*)(). In any case, everywhere you want to get the type of an expression or declaration, you use decltype (note the subtle difference in between these two. decltype(x) is not necessarily the same as decltype((x))). For example, it's ...


20

It is not easy to understand these concepts without getting formal. The primer probably does not want to confuse you and avoids introducing terms such as "lvalue", "rvalue", and "xvalue". Unfortunately, these are fundamental in order to understand how decltype works. First of all, the type of an evaluated expression is never a reference type, nor a ...


20

In C++, as in C, a parameter that's declared to be of array type is adjusted (at compile time) to be of pointer type, specifically a pointer to the array's element type. This happens whether the array type is specified directly or via a typedef (remember that a typedef doesn't create a new type, just an alias for an existing type). So this: typedef char ...


20

The "no temporary is introduced for function returning prvalue of object type in decltype" rule applies only if the function call itself is either the operand of decltype or the right operand of a comma operator that's the operand of decltype (§5.2.2 [expr.call]/p11), which means that given declprval in the OP, template< typename t > t declprval() ...


19

The difference is that this: new auto(a[i]*b[i]); is allocating an object of whatever type a[i]*b[i] is, and initializes the object with that value. That is, the parentheses are an initializer. Whereas using decltype: new decltype(a[i]*b[i]); allocates an object of the same type, but there is no initializer. The object is default initialized. ...


19

No, but there not anymore is a need for this because you can say decltype(auto) foo() const { return b_; } This will deduce the return type automatically from its body.


19

This is a known bug. The compiler will accept the code if you use a trailing return type instead. struct C { std::vector<int> v; auto begin() -> decltype(v.begin()) { return v.begin(); } auto end() -> decltype(v.end()) { return v.end(); } }; As the bug report says, another work around is by using: struct C { ...


17

It's allowed : 10.1 : "A list of base classes can be specified in a class definition using the notation:" class-or-decltype: nested-name-specifieropt class-name decltype-specifier so I guess your compiler has bug


17

decltype applied to an expression that's not an id-expression gives you a reference, so decltype(*this) is already A&, and you can't make that const again. If you really wanted to use decltype, you could do something like this: static_cast<std::decay<decltype(*this)>::type const &>(*this) Or even this: ...


16

Deriving from std::list or other std:: containers is discouraged. Write your operations as free functions so they can work on any standard container via iterators. Do you mean "define map without using a template function"? You should be able to use the result_type member type of std::function to get the type it returns. Also it's not necessary for you ...


15

declval() has the advantage that if it is used in an evaluated context (i.e., odr-used) then the program is ill-formed (20.2.4p2), and a diagnostic is required to be issued (per 1.4p1). Typically this is enforced through a static_assert in the library: c++/4.7/type_traits: In instantiation of '[...] std::declval() [...]': source.cpp:3:22: required from ...


15

Keep using iterator_traits. decltype(*iterator) could even be some sort of weird proxy class in order to do special things in the expression *iter = something. Example: #include <iostream> #include <iterator> #include <typeinfo> #include <vector> template <typename T> void print_type() { std::cout << ...


15

Okay, here is what I found in the standard (N3337) though: 7.1.6.2 Simple type specifiers [dcl.type.simple] 4   The type denoted by decltype(e) is defined as follows:   — if e is an unparenthesized id-expression or an unparenthesized class member access (5.2.5), decltype(e) is the type of the entity named by e. If there is no such ...


15

String literals are lvalues ([expr.prim.general]/p1): A literal is a primary expression. Its type depends on its form (2.13). A string literal is an lvalue; all other literals are prvalues. decltype(expr) returns an lvalue-reference when the expression expr is an lvalue expression ([dcl.type.simple]/p4): For an expression e, the type denoted by ...


14

This is what std::declval is for: decltype(*std::declval<T>()) operator*() { /* ... */ } If your implementation does not provide std::declval (Visual C++ 2010 does not include it), you can easily write it yourself: template <typename T> typename std::add_rvalue_reference<T>::type declval(); // no definition required Since T is an ...


14

decltype( bool( fun(v[0] ) ), void() ) uses the comma operator. Breaking it down, bool( fun(v[0] ) ), void() is composed of two expressions; the first bool( fun(v[0] ) ) is evaluated1 and discarded, giving the overall expression the value void() which is a value2 of type void. decltype then yields the type of the expression, which as above is ...


14

but the return statement would be ill-formed, does SFINAE result? The proposal-n3638 says, SFINAE Since the return type is deduced by instantiating the template, if the instantiation is ill-formed, this causes an error rather than a substitution failure. This allows an auto function to return a lambda, which is not possible using the ...


14

In C++11, there are two syntaxes for function declaration:     return-type identifier ( argument-declarations... ) and     auto identifier ( argument-declarations... ) -> return_type They are equivalent. Now when they are equivalent, why do you ever want to use the later? Well, C++11 introduced this cool ...


13

The wikipedia page you link has a perfect example: int& foo(int& i); float foo(float& f); template <class T> auto transparent_forwarder(T& t) −> decltype(foo(t)) { return foo(t); } Note that foo(int&) returns int& (a reference type) while foo(float&) returns float (a nonreference type). Without decltype, it's ...


13

It is valid C++0x to say decltype(f)::i. GCC just doesn't support it yet. You can work it around with an identity template template<typename T> struct identity { typedef T type; }; int x = identity<decltype(f)>::type::i; identity is part of the boost::mpl namespace.



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