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3

You are dealing with a gzipped response. You can verify this by checking the Content-Encoding response header, or writing the beginning of that byte sequence to a file and check its type with the file utility if you're on a Unix-like platform: >>> data = '\x1f\x8b\x08\x00\x00\x00\x00' >>> f = open('data.bin', 'w') >>> ...


2

You are correct! There is a bug in the returned length (and length check) in base64_decode(). There is one line missing after: n = ((n * 6) + 7) >> 3; If you put: n -= j; directly after that, it will work as expected.


2

\xa0 in that Python unicode string is the Non-breaking space character u'Mangenberger Str.\xa0162' and u'42655\xa0Solingen' are perfectly valid unicode strings. Python works with unicode strings wonderfully. Scrapy XPath selector extract() calls get you list of unicode strings. And dealing with unicode all along is usually the way to go. I would NOT ...


2

Rot13 just shifts ascii letters 13 characters. Since there are 26 letters in the ASCII alphabet, this means shifting them 13 characters again will reverse the operation. Since non-ascii-letters will be ignored by the operation altogether, the reverse of rot13 is just rot13 again, as you can see below: > $x='shapgvba purpx_sbbgre(){tybony ...


1

There is no duplication by me. <?php $array = json_decode('{"username":"zedd","profile_picture":"http:\/\/images.ak.instagram.com\/profiles\/profile_28855276_75sq_1348344197.jpg","id":"28855276","full_name":"Zedd"}',true); echo $array['profile_picture']; ?>


1

It works fine as others mention, but when you print the array it is converted to string, which means only the string "Array" will be printed instead of the real array data. You should use print_r(), var_dump(), var_export() or something similar to debug arrays like this. If you turn on notices you will see: PHP Notice: Array to string conversion in ... ...


1

It works fine, but you use wrong method to display array. To display array you cannot use echo but you need to use var_dump


1

No, it doesn't return an empty array. Printing an array with echo just prints a string "Array()". Use print_r or var_dump to get the structure of the variable. In newer PHP it will also emit a notice when using echo on an array ("Array to string conversion"), so you shouldn't do it anyway. The manual you've mentioned changed to print_r.


1

you should not use echo because it is an array. use print_r or var_dump .it works fine $json = '{"a":1,"b":2,"c":3,"d":4,"e":5}'; print_r(json_decode($json, true)); Output: Array ( [a] => 1 [b] => 2 [c] => 3 [d] => 4 [e] => 5 )


1

Appears to be to be a UUID having format as discussed here. The reason to use this format rather than a sequential number is it will be unique world-wide rather than just unique to the database. Any sort of library that expects uniqueness guaranteed by UUID would require it in that format.


1

I believe they're Unix timestamps. For example, 1400258250 maps to 4:37:30 May 16 2014. They represent the number of seconds that have elapsed since the Unix epoch, January 1, 1970. Here's a nice timestamp converter.


1

I tried Apache Commons StringEscapeUtils.unescapeHtml3() in my project, but wasn't satisfied with its performance. Turns out, it does a lot of unnecessary operations. For one, it allocates a StringWriter for every call, even if there's nothing to unescape in the string. I've rewritten that code differently, now it works much faster. Whoever finds this in ...



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