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5

The Time::Piece module is suitable for this purpose, and it has been a core module since version 10 of Perl 5 so it shouldn't need installing. Also, unpack is the most convenient way to extract the data fields from the string. It would look like this. I have used pack to create the file contents that you describe, and I had to append the fractional seconds ...


4

use the Time::Moment CPAN module: use Time::Moment; my $data = 0x0FA89EEB0F; my $seconds = $data >> 8; # Right shift to remove fractional second. my $milliseconds = 10 * ( $data & 0xff ); # Hundredths to Milli my $tm = Time::Moment->new( year => 2000, month => 1, day => 1 ); #base datetime my $tm2 = ...


3

When fetching an instruction, the CPU first analyses its first byte (the opcode). Sometimes it's sufficient to know the total length of the instruction. Sometimes it tells the CPU to analyse subsequent bytes to determine the length. But all in all, the encoding is not ambiguous. Yes, the command stream gets screwed up if you insert random bytes in the ...


2

I agree that case expressions are far easier to read and maintain, but if you encounter DECODE you should understand its structure is very similar to a case expression anyway SELECT DECODE(STOCK_TABLE.Product_Name , 'Jeans', 'PJ1' , 'Cap','PC1' , Product_Name ...


2

DECODE is a nice function, but fast unreadable (personal point of view, of course) You can perfectly use a CASE... WHEN (which does the same, but often easier to read when you have more than one if else clause) case Product_Name when 'Jeans' then 'PJ1' when 'Cap' then 'PC1' else Product_Name end as "Product Name"


1

This works for me for decoding entities to utf8: html_entity_decode($str, ENT_QUOTES | ENT_HTML5, 'UTF-8'); Edit:-- The "trick" to it is the combination in the second parameter, and including the encoding in the third parameter. That is, if you just did html_entity_decode($str); the result would not be utf8.


1

The string is in UTF-16LE encoding, according to Oracle's documentation: Sixteen-bit Unicode (or UCS) Transformation Format, little-endian byte order. More information about UTF-16 variants can be found here. After converting your base64 string to bytes, do as follows: byte[] bytes; // base64 decoded bytes String s = new String(bytes, "UTF-16LE"); The ...


1

You need to initialize the values inside your interface arrays with some concrete type or xml will not be able to infer to which type are you referring to: http://play.golang.org/p/6LVgK7rza9 // InterfaceRecord fails record := InterfaceRecord{ Fields: []Field{&DataField{}}, } ...


1

From looking at the code in the encoding/xml package, it seems, interface types are just skipped: ... switch v := val; v.Kind() { case reflect.Interface: // TODO: For now, simply ignore the field. In the near // future we may choose to unmarshal the start // element on it, if not nil. return p.Skip() ... Go version: 1.3.


1

No, there is currently no way to specify the color format for the decoder output. This is especially annoying on devices that use undocumented proprietary buffer layouts. Directing the output to a Surface results in more consistent and portable behavior, but as of API 19 there's still no convenient way to get at the pixel data (ImageReader doesn't work ...


1

You're not really returning JSON. When you do echo 'var arrayFromPhp = ' . $json . ';';, it's no longer valid JSON, just echo the JSON without the other crap and convert it on the clientside to an object. In PHP do $json = json_encode($data2DArray); echo $json; and in javascript you'd do if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200) { ...


1

I found this on SO. WebUtility.HtmlDecode vs HttpUtilty.HtmlDecode Seems to output different values based on the function called. I would use HttpUtility.HtmlDecode instead since it's matching your the behavior that you want.


1

The problem here is you're trying to apply Regex.Unescape to something which wasn't entirely processed with Regex.Escape. The same problem would be encountered with just about any encoding where you had a message partially encoded and other parts not encoded. You can try to anticipate all the variations, but there will be cases where you will be unable to ...


1

There are two separate escape types intermixed here. You can try this: Regex.Unescape(Regex.Replace(data, "\\\\([^u])", "\\\\$1")) This will preserve the \u... values but escape the other backslashes. If you do this operation often, you'll want to make a Regex pattern instance and reuse it every call: Regex regex = new Regex("\\\\([^u])"); // Reuse this ...


1

Did you check the string encoding? \xE1 is the latin1 representation of á, so it would be invalid in a utf-8 encoded string. Try to enforce a latin1 encoding by calling .force_encoding('ISO-8859-1') on the string. Also mind that it is common to use UTF-8 in URLs as well, e.g. one would encode á as %C3%A1.



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