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11

Try: System.Diagnostics.Process.Start("iexplore.exe", "http://sp.path.to/your/file.doc") See the MSDN documentation for more information about opening processes with arguments.


4

If you require it to open files, then you can use ShellExecute with the edit (or open) verb to get everything done all-in-one, else you can use SHAssocEnumHandlers to get the handlers for the text based files you are interested in. In the most simple case, you can also use %windir%\\notepad.exe which will link to notepad on any desktop version of windows.


3

There's an undocumented function call that sets this: // undocumented function call extern OSStatus _LSSetStrongBindingForRef(const FSRef *inItemRef, FSRef *inAppRefOrNil); *If you use this in your application and submit it to the AppStore it will probably get rejected.


2

I accessed the list while ago programatically in a rather ugly manner and I'm sure its not the best way. The options are stored in a file called defaults.list (I think this is generally the case). The location is less general I think it in /usr/share/applications/ on my ubuntu system although it does appear elsewhere I think. I then treated it as a text ...


2

The resolution order is $EDITOR -> editor -> some predefined list of console editors. On Debian/Ubuntu, sensible-editor (and sensible-browser and sensible-pager) will do the lookup for you, including looking at the right environment variables. Similar variables are $PAGER, $SHELL, $BROWSER. To look up a file association, you can use xdg-open.


1

This works in ubuntu/gnome: >>> query_lines = subprocess.check_output(['update-alternatives', '--query', 'gnome-text-editor']).split('\n') >>> bestlist = filter(lambda l: 'Best' in l, query_lines) >>> bestlist[0].split()[1] '/usr/bin/gedit' If ...


1

In a word: Impossible The registry cant be customised for an individual folder it is all or nothing.


1

You can't associate file extensions to trigger a .jar file on Windows. The only file types you can trigger on Windows are .exe, .pif, .com, .bat, .cmd, so instead of triggering the .jar file, you can trigger a .bat file, which then launches the .jar file. Create a y.bat file and place it next to your y.jar file and write the following code inside it: @echo ...


1

The usual way would be with FindExecutable.


1

Surely the issue here is making Windows/OSX/Linux register your program as the default which presumably has to happen outside the confines of your program? You can do an "Open with..." on Windows/Mac (not sure on Linux) and just use your program instead. Your program then could take the file name as the command line argument and do with it what you want. ...


1

I didn't test it, but I would expect that if you create a Jar file from your sources, and you let your OS point to that file to open *.txt files, then the absolute path of the file to open would be in your main's "String[] args". Can you make a quick test?


1

As you are talking about ".exe" I assume you are using Windows. You can register a new extension and the corresponding program by using ftype and assoc: Open a commandline window, and type the following: Register the new extension: assoc .bo2=GenaeDocument Associate the new type with a program: ftype GenaeDocument=javaw.exe -jar ...


1

I asume fullPath is your document's name. You're setting the FileName property to the document which means it'll open in the default document editor (Word in this case). The overload of ProcessStartInfo you're using sets the filename for you but you're replacing that value with Path.GetFileName(fullPath); which is why wordpad.exe is completely ignored. Set ...


1

As an intermediate between doing it by hand and doing it from Cocoa, there is an Automator action called "Set Application for Files". I don't think there is a supported way to do it programmatically, but some people have figured out what Finder is doing: Adding a resource of type 'usro' that contains a full path to the application. See for example this ...


1

Per-user environment variables tells you that. $EDITOR gives you the command to be launched as text editor; $BROWSER gives you the browser $PAGER gives you the pager (ex. more or less). This however is valid for command line softwares, while usually desktop environments use their own (internal) variables. Also in python you can read the environment ...


1

I don't think that the notion of default editor or terminal makes sense. For the editor, there is the convention of using $EDITOR when it is defined. On Debian and related (e.g. Ubuntu, Mint) you have paths like /usr/bin/editor and /usr/bin/x-terminal-emulator symlinked (via symlinks in /etc/alternatives/) to some system default. See also Dacav's answer


1

Here's the msdn page for Registering Programs with Client Types, which is what you need to do. It's a few registry keys, and there is even a sample for a mail client.


1

I think that you are using the Default Programs API in the wrong way. If I understand correctly the default programs functionality was added by Microsoft due to legal requirements to replace Internet Explorer as the default browser. It offers another set of functionality than the normal file associations used by aplications. If you just have a simple file ...



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