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22

It's actually really easy to understand. Let's look at what's going on here when the expression is evaluated: First the delayedAdd(2, 3) function will be called. It does some stuff and then returns. The "magic" is all about its return value which is a function. To be more precise it's a function that expects at least one argument (I'll get back to that). ...


14

mhlz's answer is very clear. As a supplementary, here I compose a delayedAdd for your to better understand the process function delayedAdd(a, b) { var sum = a + b return function(f1) { var result1 = f1(sum) return function(f2) { f2(result1) } } } Where in your example code, the function you passed as f1 is: function (result) { ...


13

This is a common mistake in how to use jQuery.when(). jQuery.when() requires promises as arguments. It does not have magical powers to know when functions you pass it are somehow done. Those functions MUST return promises that are resolved or rejected when the underlying code is done and you can then pass those promises to jQuery.when(). Your ...


7

So I answered my own question while proofreading my post. Rather than delete it to hide my embarrassment, I'll leave it up in case others suffer the same confusion. The deferred function evaluates any ARGUMENTS to the function when it's called. It does not immediately evaluate any values WITHIN the function body. So internal assignments are executed when ...


7

Functions are first-class citizens in JS - that means (among others), they can take the role of actual parameters and function return values. Your code fragment maps functions to functions. The signatures of the functions in your chained call might look like this. delayedAdd: number -> fn // returns function type a a: fn ( ...


6

To be fair this pattern can be either chaining or currying(or partial application). Depending how it's implemented. Note this is a theoretical answer to provide more information about the pattern and not your specific use case. Chaining There is nothing special here because we can just return a function that will be called again. Functions in javascript ...


5

When an error is handled (and, either a value is returned or no value at all), the promise returned from then is considered resolved. You have to return a rejected promise from each error handler in order to propagate and chain error handlers. For example: promseA.then( function success() { }, function error() { return $q.reject(); }) ...


5

Create a function to handle the iterations: function go (urls) { if (urls[0]) { require(urls[0]).then(function () { go(urls.slice(1)); }); } } go(urls);


5

Well, promises are all about return values. When you do: chain1.then(function(){ nowFollowupOnChain1(); }); You're not chaining the promise and not waiting for the operation inside nowFollowupOnChain1 - instead, you're branching the chain. What you probably want to be doing is to use the return value and to chain the promise: chain1 = ...


5

All excellent answers here, especially @mhlz and @Leo, I'd like to touch on the chaining part you've mentioned. Leo's example shows the idea of calling functions like foo()()() but only works for fixed number of callbacks. Here's an attempt to imlpement unlimited chaining: delayedAdd = function da(a, b){ // a function was passed: call it on the result if( ...


5

Generally what is important is x cannot be a parameter of the function you are deferring, because they are evaluated when defer is executed. 1) With Anonymous Function Here's a solution using an anonymous function: defer func() { fmt.Println(x) }() Here x is not a parameter of the deferred anonymous function, so it will not be evaluated. Only when the ...


5

You're confusing two different things: The conditional operator Method arguments All method arguments are evaluated before the method is called, even if they inside the method end up not being used. So the fact that you are using the conditional operator inside the method has no bearing on the arguments, they are all evaluated. So this call: var a1 = ...


4

From a really simple test, it seems that the defer does not wait for the async scripts to load... but (there's always a but) it also seems that it depends on the browser. I ran tests on Chrome 41, Firefox 36 and Internet Explorer 11, and got the same results for Chrome and FF (with defer executing before async) but different results on IE (async always ...


4

Yes your lines that say q.then(log("...")) should say q.then(function() { log("...") }). Your log function is fine but the way your code currently works is that you are already calling it and passing its return value to the then function. That's why you need to create a new function which the deferred will call later when it resolves.


4

The problem is, you need to return promise from the start method return { other: function () {}, start: function () { var dfd = $.Deferred(); el.filter.animate({ "opacity": "0.6", "filter": "alpha(opacity=60)" }, 2000, "easeInOutCirc", function () { el.share.removeClass('fa-spin'); ...


4

Using lodash for brevity. _.reduce(_.rest(calls), function(promise, call) { return promise.then(function() { return call(); }); }, _.first(calls)()).then(function() { // do something after they are all done sequentially. });


4

The traditional way: The traditional way to solve this is to add the promises to an array, then evaluate them all together using $.when.apply var promise = []; for (var i = 0; i < 6; i++){ promise.push(delay(10-i, $('#' + i))); } $.when.apply($, promise).done(function(){ alert("All done"); }); JSFiddle: ...


4

You should return defer.promise; You can find more information about $q here in the official docs.


4

Python's with statement serves a similar purpose to Go's defer. The similar code in Python is: mutex = Lock() def someFunction(): with mutex: # Whatever you want, with as many return statements # as you want, wherever. Simply forget that you ever # locked a mutex, or that you have to remember to # release it again.


3

Why don't use self.signals.send_catch_log_deferred(signal=signals.engine_started) directly but instead of a yield ? Because send_catch_log_deferred returns a Deferred object. If you want to avoid a yield there, then you should use send_catch_log but the point of using send_catch_log_deferred is to allow listeners to return Deferred objects. The signals ...


3

Yes, promise will be returned to the caller instead of the data and that is how we can take advantage of the asynchronous functions. This is the common sequence of actions in handling async calls, Make an async call. Return a Promise to the caller. At this point, caller doesn't have to wait for the result. It can simply define a then function, which knows ...


3

Presuming the code in your questions is functional and _modalScope is accessible from the _showModal() function, then the code below should answer your question: function ConfirmModal($q, $modal) { return { showModal: function _showModal(options) { return $q(function(resolve, reject) { var _modal = $modal(options) ...


3

it('should return a promise resolved with the http response data if the http request is successful', inject(function($httpBackend) { var expectedData = 'fake data'; $httpBackend.expectGET('http://localhost/ang/api/v1/users/names').respond(expectedData); var promise = factory.getNames(); var actualData; promise.then(function(result) { ...


3

If you wrap the fmt.Println call in another function (an anonymous function, in this case), the evaluation of Even() will happen after the other calls to Even have completed: func main() { Even := MakeEvenNumber() defer func() { fmt.Println("a ", Even()) }() fmt.Println("b ", Even()) fmt.Println("c ", Even()) fmt.Println("d ...


3

You can't pass more then one parameter into then callback, only the one is expected and considered. What you can do however is to resolve your promise with an object. For example: ResourcesService.prototype.list = function () { var settings = fetchSettings(); return restService.getAll(resourceName, settings).then(function (response) { ...


3

JS is single threaded, so the actual execution order of your current code is as follows: store.count(); // trigger some async code req.onsuccess; req.onerror; // attach the callbacks // some other code in the same function/scope may follow // your code is finished; next item from event ...


3

Usually for this case people use ng-model-options={debounce: 100}. https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/directive/ngModelOptions anyway you can reject promise.


3

// you have an array of numbers var array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]; // let's create an array of promises: each number has its // corresponding promise, created by calling the DB with that number var promises = array.map(function(number) { return callDb(number); }); // so now you have an array of promises $q.all(promises).then(function(results) { // so ...


3

The problem that you're running into here is that IRCClient's API is rather crummy (sorry about that!). Specifically, it has APIs like .whois() which should return a Deferred, but don't. You can fix this problem by making your own version of these APIs which do, in fact, return a Deferred. The general idea is that IRC requests and responses don't have ...


2

Answering the question in your second post, maybe you better edit your original post with the new issue you encountered. If what you are looking for is a way to activate a state (home.myPrjMain in your case) you can do this in various ways: Using JS - use $state.go(). See - $State documentation Using directive - use the ui-sref directive with the name of ...



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