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8

You don't need to manually copy and paste items from SRFI 13: it is built into Racket. In fact, most of the major SRFI libraries are bundled with Racket: http://docs.racket-lang.org/srfi/index.html If you are using the r5rs language in Racket, you can pull in SRFI 13 with the following line: (#%require srfi/13) The strange-looking #%require is a ...


7

You can't -- you have to have some way to test things and act on whether they're true or false. You could get close though, with some functional representation of booleans. For example, with a common church encoding: (define (true x y) x) (define (false x y) y) and now you can consider a test (that returns one of these encoded booleans) as a function ...


7

You want define-for-syntax (in Racket). (define-for-syntax _iota 0) (define-syntax (iota stx) (syntax-case stx () ((iota) (let ((i _iota)) (set! _iota (+ i 1)) #`#,i)))) (define zero (iota)) (define one-two-three (list (iota) (iota) (iota))) (define (four) (iota)) (equal? zero 0) (equal? one-two-three '(1 2 3)) (equal? (four) 4) ...


7

Racket macros are designed to avoid capture by default. When you use define-syntax-rule it will respect lexical scope. When you want to "break hygiene" intentionally, traditionally in Scheme you have to use syntax-case and (carefully) use datum->syntax. But in Racket the easiest and safest way to do "anaphoric" macros is with a syntax parameter and the ...


6

To answer your second question: syntax-case is the other form that goes inside define-syntax. Kent Dybvig is the primary proponent of syntax-case, and he has a tutorial on using it [PDF]. I also read the PLT Scheme documentation on syntax-case for a few more examples, and to learn about the variation in implementation.


6

(define bop list) (define-syntax op (syntax-rules () ((op a b) (bop a b)) ((op a b c ...) (op (bop a b) c ...)))) For example, (op 1 2 3 4) expands to (bop (bop (bop 1 2) 3) 4) and evaluates to (((1 2) 3) 4).


5

It seems to me that you have pushed the responsibility of the implementation from the macro to the compiler something the R5RS designers seem to be trying to avoid. In fact local defines are implemented with letrec in R5RS. See 6.2.2 Internal definitions. I think the designers intentions are summed up well in the introduction to the R5RS: Programming ...


5

It is possible to build a macro expander that manipulates the syntax expression as regular Racket data. However, that's not really necessary in this case. One thing I would recommend is changing your syntax slightly, so that each pattern-replacement pair is enclosed in brackets. Like this: (macro id [(param) replacement1] [(params ...) replacement2]) ...


5

Looks like you need to import support for syntax-rules first (see http://www.gnu.org/software/guile/docs/docs-1.8/guile-ref/Syntax-Rules.html): (use-syntax (ice-9 syncase)) Then you need to change the square brackets to parens; after that it should work. Definitely don't quote the literals list; that's a sequence of identifiers, like lambda formals, not ...


5

The correct syntax for a define is: #define VARIABLE @"value"


4

See Greg Hendershott's macro tutorial. This section uses anaphoric if as example: http://www.greghendershott.com/fear-of-macros/Syntax_parameters.html


4

In Scheme, using syntax-rules(): (define-syntax function (syntax-rules () ((function name (args ...) body ...) (define (name args ...) body ...)))) The error you are seeing is that apparently Chicken Scheme's compiler expects the second form of define-syntax to be a macro expansion procedure - they typically require arguments for renaming and ...


4

The list of resources at The Scheme Cookbook is a great place to start. If you prefer papers, then don't hessitate to visit readscheme.org.


3

R5RS states that the semantics of letrec are exactly the same as those of internal definitions. See the section devoted to the latter for details; I quote the key fragment below: A <body> containing internal definitions can always be converted into a completely equivalent letrec expression. Thus defining letrec in terms of internal defines just ...


3

Yeah, you need to get f from somewhere -- your macro just makes it up, and therefore it is not visible to users of foo. When you do consider that you need to get it from somewhere, the question is where would you get it from? Here's a fixed version of your code that assumes that it is the first thing in the second subform of foo: (define-syntax foo ...


3

The way you have defined the macro is not correct as per Chicken documentation. Your code seems to be more inspired by Common Lisp macros. Check out the doc here for define-syntax with transformer function: The macro should be defined as: (define-syntax function (lambda (expr inject compare) `(define (,(cadr expr) ,@(caddr expr)) ,(cadddr ...


2

You can implement if with only higher-order procedures. This is the obvious uncurried Church encoding: IF ? T E === (? (lambda () T) (lambda () F)) TRUE === (lambda (t _) (t)) FALSE === (lambda (_ f) (f)) You don't need continuations at all. True is a binary function that executes it's first argument; False is a binary function that executes ...


2

You don't say what version of Scheme you're using. It appears that it doesn't support 'dot' patterns in macros. In Racket, it looks like your code works: #lang racket (define-syntax function (syntax-rules () ((_ () body ...) (lambda () body ...)) ((_ (param) body ...) (lambda (param) body ...)) ((_ (param_1 param_2 params ...) body ...


2

Just so you know, you don't need to use define-syntax to support currying. Generally using syntax when you don't need to is frowned upon because 1) syntax introduces different evaluation rules and 2) syntax can't be used as a value. Here are two implementations, one for (left) curry and one for right curry: (define (curry func . curry-args) (lambda ...


2

It's not possible to create a function where the formal parameters and body are given as run-time values (S-expressions) without using eval. But based on your answer to Greg's comment, you can change your defmethod macro to avoid this issue. Your current approach takes the variables and body expression (program terms), converts them to run-time values, then ...


2

Macros are expanded at compile time, thus something like (begin exps ... (forloop (+ start 1) stop exps ...)) will expand forloop again and again, regardless of what the value of (+ start 1) is (which is evaluated at runtime). Perhaps the best you can do, at least with syntax-rules, is to use the macro to capture only the expressions to run, and use ...


1

The function you want to apply to the arguments should itself be an argument to the macro. Barring that, my solution was the same. #!r6rs (import (rnrs base)) (define-syntax claudiu (syntax-rules () ((claudiu fun first second) (fun first second)) ((claudiu fun first second rest ...) (claudiu fun (claudiu fun first second) rest ...)))) ...


1

A macro might not require its arguments to be written as a vector, yet provide useful behaviour for when they are. The most notable example would probably be quasiquote: ;; a couple of test variables (define foo 1) (define bar 2) ;; vector literals in Scheme are implicitly quoted #(foo bar) ; returns #(foo bar), i.e. a vector of two symbols ;; however ...



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