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2

you can use join function. def print_with_dashes(x): print '-'.join(x) Demo: >>> print_with_dashes('hello') h-e-l-l-o >>>


2

Your macro, after preprocessor expands it, will look like this: ((a++)*(a++)) Notice that, a++ is the same as a = a + 1, so you can rewrite expanded macro as: ((a = a + 1)*(a = a + 1)) You are changing value of a (or num, to be exact) twice in one statement, which generates warning, as this is undefined behaviour. I would suggest you to rewrite your ...


0

another possible solution is to use ./ in front of the filename during the include. i discovered it inadvertently. define("kPEPost", "1"); and the include: include("./header"); include("./includes/config.inc.php");


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It sounds like you just don't have config.php (or that particular copy of config.php) in your include path. Suggestion Define a root index.php for your entire web app; Do this: define('BASE_DIR', realpath(__FILE__)); Then you can do this: require_once BASE_DIR.'config.php'; Further reading How to include config.php efficiently? ...


0

Use extern int global instead.


0

An enum has integral type in C, so you will not get the string value if you move them to an enum, but an integral value. If you need the string values, you will need a function to do the enum-to-string conversion. It is not the same, but maybe using an array could be an alternative: static const char **My_CheckButtons = {"Check1", "Check2", ... , "CheckN"}; ...


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Simply do this: typedef enum{Check1, Check2, Check3} My_CheckButton;


1

Another error in your Rectangle class is that the get_bottom_right() method is supposed to return a tuple, not print it. Of course, returning a tuple in the interpreter without assigning it will cause it to be printed.


2

You are looking for, class Rectangle(object): ... This is a new-style class. Read more in this SO post: Old style and new style classes in Python I also have a feeling that your homework system is using pylint to verify/grade your code. You might want to stick to PEP8 standards.


0

Shorter way: var queue = function (args){ typeof variableToCheck !== "undefined"? doSomething(args) : setTimeout(function () {queue(args)}, 2000); }; You can also pass arguments


1

Your code REP(j, v.size()){ will be interpreted as for(int j=0;j<=v.size()-1;++j) { vector::size() returns an unsigned integral value. If the size is zero, v.size()-1 makes the maximum integral value, that is, j<=v.size()-1 is always true.


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The type of v.size() is unsigned. If you extend the line REP(j, v.size()){ you'll get for(int j=0;j<=v.size()-1;++j). If v is empty, the result of v.size()-1 is the maximum value an unsigned var of the type of v.size() can hold. In j<=v.size()-1 the variable j is promoted to an unsigned type. This leads to no boundary for j and it becomes easy to see ...


3

The problem is that your FOR macro is doing b - 1. So if b is 0, and unsigned (as v.size() is I believe) you will get a very large number instead of -1. You should use the following macros: #define FOR(i,a,b) for(int i=a;i<b;++i) #define REP(i,n) FOR(i,0,n)


0

In scanf, the percent (%) symbol has special meaning and expects to be followed by a formatting character that matches the corresponding type. Although you are trying to use "%50", this is a string literal and thus the macro name is just an ordinary string in this context. In order to expand it, you will need to use implicit concatenation of adjacent string ...


3

About the pre-processor First of all, I think there's a need to clarify how the preprocessor works: it pre-processes the input files, which means it runs before the compiler. Unfortunatly, for historical reasons, it doesn't know anything about C or C++, doesn't parse anything, and just does very simple textual operations on words and parenthesis. Just to ...


0

Under standard C, this is not possible; during preprocessing, the compiler simply sees the identifier i as simply that - an identifier. It does not know that i is of type int, or that it's even a variable in the first place. The easiest way to achieve what's intended is to use an array, like so: int i; int y[] = { 0, 1, 4 }; for (i = 0; i < 3; i++) // ...


0

Well you don't have to, but it could cause weird situations. #defines do direct text substitutions, so imagine this situation: #define foo(x) (x << 1) ... int r = 1; int y = foo( r + 1 ); What is the value of y? What you would want is most likely y = 4. That is add 1 to R then shift left by 1 But you actually get y = 3. Why? The direct ...


0

Always put parentheses around your macro arguments. Macro expansion happens before compilation, and it just replaces the text of your parameters as they are in code. At pre-compile time, there are no values to be interpreted, so parentheses are necessary to preserve the order of operations. In your example, the macro index(x + 1, y) is expanded to: ((x + ...


3

With the first definition, this: index(x + 1, y) expands to: (((x + 1) % 5) + ((y) % 5) * 5) With the second, it expands to: ((x + 1 % 5) + (y % 5) * 5) The problem is x + 1 % 5. Since % has higher precedence than +, it's equivalent to x + (1 % 5), which is not what you want. When expanding macros, the preprocessor expands sequences of tokens. It ...


0

Because when you use: #define index(x, y) ((x % 5) + (y % 5) * 5) index(x + 1, y) is interpred as index((x + 1 % 5) + (y % 5) *5) And since modulo (%) has higher precedence than + the result is wrong. Take a look at the table of precedence here.


1

Because the macro parameters are effectively copy pasted code: Given this: #define index(x, y) ((x % 5) + (y % 5) * 5) Then this is the transformation a[index(x + 1, y)] a[((x + 1 % 5) + (y % 5) * 5)] Note that first part: (x + 1 % 5) That is exactly why every instructional book should mention that you should wrap macro parameters in ...


5

This is a limitation of the parser engine. When used in const you're inherently limited by the tokenization of the code, being that a token starting with numbers is treated as a number by definition, as required by many mathematical expressions. This is why you see the unexpected T_LNUMBER error in that usage. Since define is a language construct taking a ...


0

The value contained in the board array are enum with the values WHITE, RED, K_WHITE, K_RED you have to use condition statement such as if, or better switch statement. For the use of if else statement. Example: if (board[i][j] == RED) { printf("%s",RED_DISPLAY); } else if (border[i][j] == WHITE){ .... } The define in the pre-processor are strings and ...


7

As a follow-up to Slava's answer, you can use member pointers... as template arguments ! template <unsigned char RGBTriple::*Tchannel> compute_disperse(/* Whatever you need */) { error = ((int)(currentPixel->*Tchannel)) - palette.table[index].*Tchannel; /* ... */ } Least typing possible, flexible, and fully inlined by any decent compiler. ...


1

This is unchanged: typedef struct{ unsigned char R, G, B; } RGBTriple; Typedef an accessor function: typedef char & Accessor(RGBTriple *); Define accessor functions for each channel char & AccessR(RGBTriple * pixel) { return pixel->R;} char & AccessG(RGBTriple * pixel) { return pixel->G;} char & AccessB(RGBTriple * pixel) { ...


2

Obvious solution would be to pass pointer to member unsigned char RGBTriple::*channel but I bet that would have perfomance issues. I would use template instead: enum ChannelName { R, G, B }; template <ChannelName> unsigned char &getChannel( RGBTriple &rgb ); template <> unsigned char &getChannel<R>( RGBTriple &rgb ) { ...


1

Use an union for your RGB type, allowing refer to channels both as R,G,B and as an array. Then write an enum with the channels (Actually used as indices of the array): struct RGB { union { struct { unsigned char R , G , B }; unsigned char channels[3]; }; }; enum rgb_channel{ R = 0 , G = 1 , B = 2 }; Here is an example: ...



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