Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

119

Firstly, you can del other things besides local variables del list_item[4] del dictionary["alpha"] Both of which should be clearly useful. Secondly, using del on a local variable makes the intent clearer. Compare: del foo to foo = None I know in the case of del foo that the intent is to remove the variable from scope. It's not clear that foo ...


93

The first is more efficient than the second. del foo.bar compiles to two bytecode instructions: 2 0 LOAD_FAST 0 (foo) 3 DELETE_ATTR 0 (bar) whereas delattr(foo, "bar") takes five: 2 0 LOAD_GLOBAL 0 (delattr) 3 LOAD_FAST 0 (foo) 6 ...


56

There's this part of what del does (from the Python Language Reference): Deletion of a name removes the binding of that name from the local or global namespace Assigning None to a name does not remove the binding of the name from the namespace. (I suppose there could be some debate about whether removing a name binding is actually useful, but that's ...


18

There are a couple of things going on here. When your Person4 class is instantiated, it initialises its population class variable to 0. From your interactive console, you appear to be running your "test1.py" file multiple times. The second time you run it, the Person4 class is declared again which makes it technically different from the first one (even ...


17

I don't think that del by itself is a code smell. Reusing a variable name in the same namespace is definitely a code smell as is not using classes and other namespaces where appropriate. So using del to facilitate that sort of thing is a code smell. The only really appropriate use of del that I can think of off the top of my head is breaking cyclic ...


17

In CPython, at least, files are closed when the file object is deallocated. See the file_dealloc function in Objects/fileobject.c in the CPython source. Dealloc methods are sort-of like __del__ for C types, except without some of the problems inherent to __del__.


17

A little coding exploration of the way the splat operator works: def foo(*keys) puts keys.inspect end >> foo("hi", "there") ["hi", "there"] >> foo(["hi", "there"]) [["hi", "there"]] >> foo(*["hi", "there"]) ["hi", "there"] So passing in a regular array will cause that array to be evaluated as a single item, so that you get an array ...


17

You cannot assume that __del__ will ever be called - it is not a place to hope that resources are automagically deallocated. If you want to make sure that a (non-memory) resource is released, you should make a release() or similar method and then call that explicitly (or use it in a context manager as pointed out by Thanatos in comments below). At the very ...


15

You can write myDict.pop(key, None)


15

Redirect output to nul: del {whateveroptions} 2>nul Or check for existence first: if exist c:\folder\file del c:\folder\file PS: You can use if exists c:\folder\nul or just if exists c:\folder\ (with the trailing \) to check if c:\folder is indeed a folder and not a file.


13

Unquestionably the former. In my view this is like asking whether foo.bar is better than getattr(foo, "bar"), and I don't think anyone is asking that question :)


11

It's really a matter of preference, but the first is probably preferable. I'd only use the second one if you don't know the name of the attribute that you're deleting ahead of time.


10

cpython at least works on reference counting to determine when objects will be deleted. Here you have multiple references to the same objects. a refers to the same object that c[0] references. When you loop over c (for i in c:), at some point i also refers to that same object. the del keyword removes a single reference, so: for i in c: del i ...


10

The del statement doesn't reclaim memory. It removes a reference, which decrements the reference count on the value. If the count is zero, the memory can be reclaimed. CPython will reclaim the memory immediately, there's no need to wait for the garbage collector to run. In fact, the garbage collector is only needed for reclaiming cyclic structures. As ...


10

l and c are bound to the same object. They both are references to a list, and manipulating that list object is visible through both references. del c unbinds c; it removes the reference to the list. del l[::2] removes a specific set of indices from the list, you are now operating on the list object itself. You are not unbinding l, you are unbinding indices ...


10

Use bash's extglob feature. To enable it, if it's not already on: shopt -s extglob Then you can simply negate the glob: rm !(*.html)


9

Your __del__ method assumes that the class is still present by the time it is called. This assumption is incorrect. Groupclass has already been cleared when your Python program exits and is now set to None. Test if the global reference to the class still exists first: def __del__(self): if Groupclass: Groupclass.count -= 1 or use type() to ...


9

del is more explicit and efficient; delattr allows dynamic attribute deleting. Consider the following examples: for name in ATTRIBUTES: delattr(obj, name) or: def _cleanup(self, name): """Do cleanup for an attribute""" value = getattr(self, name) self._pre_cleanup(name, value) delattr(self, name) self._post_cleanup(name, value) ...


9

There's no reason to backup whole DFM file. Before doing something to your ImageList you should export your images: click the "Export" button in the image list editor and it will save all images to a single .BMP file. After changing properties: ColorDepth = cd32Bit, DrawingStyle = dsTransparent You should click "Add" button and select the file you ...


8

Running del l will remove any reference to the list, so the symbol l will be gone. In contrast, running del l[:] removes the contents of the list, leaving l as an empty list. The __del__ method is what runs when the last reference to an instance is being destroyed. The order of deletion isn't specified and is implementation specific. When you run del ...


8

This is easy to do as a generator. Wrap your call to it in a list constructor if you want a fresh list with the zero-runs removed. def compact_zero_runs(iterable, max_zeros): zeros = 0 for i in iterable: if i == 0: zeros += 1 if zeros <= max_zeros: yield i else: zeros = 0 ...


8

Just another thinking. When debugging http applications in framework like Django, the call stack full of useless and messed up variables previously used, especially when it's a very long list, could be very painful for developers. so, at this point, namespace controlling could be useful.


8

The problem has nothing to do with garbage collection. As documented, the as clause binds the return value of the __enter__ method. You aren't returning anything, so you get None. If you want the Writer object to be returned, you need to do return self at the end of the __enter__ method.


7

Either redirect stderr to nul rd /q /s "c:\yourFolder" 2>nul Or verify that folder exists before deleting. Note that the trailing \ is critical in the IF condition. if exist "c:\yourFolder\" rd /q /s "c:\yourFolder"


7

One answer to this is to always allow the objects that you are putting into the lists to manage list membership. For example, rather than saying listA.append(objectA) you would use objectA.addToList(listA) This would allow you to internally store a list of all list that contain objectA. Then, when you want to delete objectA, you need to call a method ...


7

You can use this find command: find /your/path -maxdepth 1 -type f ! -name '*.html' -delete


6

Here's how you delete a single item from a list (a in your case), assuming c is a list. del c[0] Here's how you delete every item from a list. del c[:] Here's how you delete the first two items from a list. del c[:2]


6

The first deletion changes the list indices, so the next one isn't where it was before... Simplified >>> a = [1, 2, 3] >>> del a[0] # should delete 1 >>> a [2, 3] >>> del a[1] # This use to be the index for 2, but now `3` is at this index >>> a [2]


6

As you've discovered, model fields aren't actually class attributes, even though they appear to be. Models are constructed by some very clever but complicated hacking around with metaclasses. When a model class definition is executed (the first time its models.py is imported), the metaclass runs through all the field definitions for that model, and calls ...


6

General advice: don't use __ del __ in Python. It can break garbage collection in a number of ways, esp. in the case of circular references between objects. In your example, there're various issues related to the usage of execfile() - which is not a best practice - and the redefinition of global variables. By the way, if you really need to create a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible