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0

Since you have the DataSource array (_items) setup after the view gets loaded: Make sure that the carousel view in your storyboard does have the IBOutlet to the controller, but NOT the 'Delegate' and 'DataSource' linked to the File's Owner (Controller or view). Set the _carousel.delegate and _carousel.dataSource to 'self' only After you initialize and ...


0

To get the imageView reference, try this: UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, 200.0f, 200.0f)]; imageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"page.png"]; view = imageView;


0

UPDATE: In your viewDidLoad, you have _carousel = [[iCarousel alloc] init]; looks like you forgot to set a frame for _carousel and add it as a subView.


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Place breakpoints to check whether the iCarousel Datasource and Delegate methods are being called or not. If the methods are not called, check whether the controller follows the iCarousel protocols like this: @interface yourViewController : UIViewController <iCarouselDataSource, iCarouselDelegate> Obviously you'll have to #import ...


6

You need to implement forwardingTargetForSelector: - (id)forwardingTargetForSelector:(SEL)aSelector { if ([self.tableViewDelegate respondsToSelector:aSelector]) { return self.tableViewDelegate; } // etc return [super forwardingTargetForSelector:aSelector]; }


1

You have dictionary of delegates, but it keeps values of your events at the moment of creation of the dictionary. At that point both OnCreateXXXX are null. As an option can use dictionary of Action and call event in each so action will use current value of the event, not the initial one: private Dictionary<string,Action<string>> ...


1

We figured that the proxy class created by delphi its used for non web apps, so we actualy just doing a request using HttpClient Class instead. thanks all!


1

You would have to write: this.Invoke(m_dlgtReport, (Object) new Object[] { "text", 101, true }); The important part being the cast to (Object).


0

Give this extension method a shot (per C# Is action.BeginInvoke(action.EndInvoke,null) a good idea?) to ensure no memory leaks: public static void FireAndForget( this Action action ) { action.BeginInvoke(action.EndInvoke, null); } And you could use it with generic parameters as: T1 param1 = someValue; T2 param2 = otherValue; (() => ...


2

Assuming that AssociateCustomerReportsToGroupNameBy and AssociateOnlineReportsToGroupNameBy have identical signatures, you could eliminate the repetition of the common code by passing in a delegate that has the same signature as these two methods, and calling it from the implementation. Rather than defining new delegates, you could use ...


2

Declare a delegate as class level variable public delegate void MyDelegate(UserReportSavePermissionRequest) Instantiate the delegate MyDelegate del = new MyDelegate(AddCustomer); MyDelegate del2 = new MyDelegate(AddOnline); Alternatively, if you can even chain the delegates. invoke the method on the delegate by passing a ...


2

You don't give much explanation as to why you want these to be delegates so I will assume you want to be able to call these methods from other classes. Create a delegate type that matches the signature of your method(s): Your signature for your delegates is one with no return value and 1 parameter of type UserReportSavePermissionRequest. So add this ...


4

What I think you are trying to do is get the address of an unmanaged function. What GetFunctionPointerForDelegate does is return a pointer to a managed address for unmanaged code to call, which isn't what you are looking for. If you need to get the address of a native function from a module, you should use native Win32 to do that, like using GetProcAddress ...


1

Adding @objc solved the problem. @objc protocol MyCellDelegate { func onButtonClicked(theCell : MyCell) }


0

This might help other people who are adding Multipeer Connectivity straight to a ViewController. At the top of myViewControllerName.h add '<MCSessionDelegate>': @interface myViewControllerName : UIViewController<MCSessionDelegate>


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What i comes to know from your queries and concerns i found something UIStoryboard *storyboard = [UIStoryboard storyboardWithName:@"Main" bundle:nil]; searchVC = (ControllerA *)[storyboard instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"controllerA"]; searchVC.delegate = self; [self.navigationController pushViewController:searchVC animated:YES]; ...


3

You are doing self.searchGarden = [[SearchGardenTable alloc]init]; But you said you have your view controllers in a storyboard. This makes me think self.searchGarden at the point of viewDidLoad: is a different object from the one in the storyboard. You should assign an object to self.searchGarden when you are preparing to push your VC B or before ...


0

Long shot but did you try: [[self delegate] addItemViewController:self didFinishWithGardenID:_kidGaedenID gardenName:_kidGardenName andCityName:_kidCityName]]; instead of [self.delegate addItemViewController:self didFinishWithGardenID:_kidGaedenID gardenName:_kidGardenName andCityName:_kidCityName];


1

Please show your VC B initialisation. Make sure that self.searchGarden is initialised before you calling this line self.searchGarden.delegate = self; // in VC A viewDidLoad.


0

You can try willDismissCompletionHandler instead. This is defined in MZFormSheetController.h file.Type case the parameter presentedViewController to your view controller (AddKid I assume) and you can access properties of AddKit class here. @property (nonatomic, copy) MZFormSheetCompletionHandler willDismissCompletionHandler; ...


0

In order to pass details back to your parent view controller you should set up a delegate protocol which will allow exactly what you're looking for. If you've not created any delegate protocols before, then once you have read this tutorial and used it a couple of times, you will find you use it a lot. There are many good tutorial about this, though here ...


1

You should create a delegate protocol which allows the modal view controller to send notifications to its creator. @protocol ModalViewControllerDelegate @optional - (void)modalViewControllerDidCancel:(ModalViewController *)vc; - (BOOL)modalViewControllerShouldSave:(ModalViewController *)vc; @end Then, in ModalViewController you define a new property. The ...


5

You can't, basically. Default values for parameters have to be compile-time constants. However, if you're happy to use null as a value meaning "use the default" you could have: void FooWithDelegateParam(Func<string, string> predicate = null) { predicate = predicate ?? (x => x); // Code using predicate } Or use an overload, as per ...


1

You can't specify default value like that. Write an overload instead: void FooWithDelegateParam() { FooWithDelegateParam(s => s); } void FooWithDelegateParam(Func<string,string> predicate) { }


0

Allocating and initializing a new ViewController won't give you any of the data in storyboard. You need to load the ViewController in from your nib. How can I load storyboard programmatically from class? Still I have to question what you're doing. Even if you want to wait until your roster is done before performing a segue, it might be a better idea to ...


2

The issue is with this line: scrollView = [[UIScrollView alloc] initWithFrame:(CGRectMake(0, 0, 320, self.view.frame.size.height))];. You're re-initializing scrollView so all of the above properties are ignored and the only property actually set is the backgroundColor property. To fix this change this line: scrollView = [[UIScrollView alloc] init]; ...


1

Protocols are useful for separating implementation from interface, which helps increase code reusability, understandability, and testability. For example, perhaps you wish to store items in a List of some sort. Some possible implementations of a List include array-based implementations and node-based (linked-list) implementations. If you were to declare a ...


1

I think you didn't fully get the understanding what protocols are. I always say protocols are like contracts. The delegate object that implements a certain protocols promises that it can do things the delegator can't do. In real world I have a problem with my house's tubes. I (the delegator) call a plumber (the delegate) to fix it. The plumber promises (by ...


1

This is mostly a matter of opinion so this question should probably be closed, but I think the developer community as a whole is in an agreement on this so I am going to answer it anyway. An important concept in Software Architecture (the design of the structure of code) is called Separation of Concerns. The basic principle is that you should break down ...


1

It is a basic design principle to not expose any more of a design than you have to. By passing the reference around you are exposing the whole object. Which means that others can call any of its functions and access any of its properties. And change them. This isn't good. Besides letting others use the object in ways it might not have intended, you will also ...


0

You need to set the delegate when you segue to the MessengerTableViewController. Since you're using a segue, you should do that in prepareForSegue. Get a reference to the MessengerTableViewController with segue.destinationViewController. override func prepareForSegue(segue: UIStoryboardSegue!, sender: AnyObject!) { let messengerTVC: ...


0

Maybe try declaring a MessageTableViewController property in your header file, and then bind it to the MessageTableViewController in your storyboard? Then in the init() you could assign that property to be the object's delegate?


2

you can do it like this: Thread thread; bool flag = false; public MainWindow() { InitializeComponent(); thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(search)); thread.Start(); } private void textBoxInput_TextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e) ...


1

The key point is that you can't access UI elements from background threads -- textBoxInput, for example. So you'll have to create a local copy of the Text property first: string text = textBoxInput.Text; new Thread(delegate() { search(text); }).Start(); Also, if the "search" function does some kind of UI manipulation, which I assume it does, then you'll ...


2

the problem may be that at the end of the viewDidLoad method, the monthPicker object gets deallocated. try to make monthPicker be a property instead, see if that works


0

This line creates a brand new view controller. It does not get the one that's already in your view hierarchy. toolBarViewController = [[ToolBarViewController alloc] init]; If the ToolBarViewController is already in your view hierarch you should be doing something like this. - (void)viewDidLoad { [super viewDidLoad]; [self.toolBarViewController ...


0

You need to mark the method as optional in your delegate protocol: @objc protocol ReactorDelegate { optional func ReactorUpdateUI() } Then mark your class as @objc and use optional chaining on the method, too: delegate?.ReactorUpdateUI?() Note: When writing a protocol, it's easiest to keep everything required and stub out the methods in your class, ...


0

you don't need to use delegates or anything. You just need a reference to the CustomView in the ViewController then use something like: for (UIView *view in [_myCustomView subviews]) { if ([view isKindOfClass:([UIButton class])]) { //Test the tag if (view.tag == 5) { //found it! do something with it. break; ...


0

If you have reference to your CustomView in ViewController you can do something like that: for (UIView *v in self.customView.subviews) { if ([v isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]]) { int tag = v.tag; } } However if you haven't got any references to the custom view try this: for (UIView *v in self.view.subviews) { if ([v ...


0

From what I understand, the CheckSession method is asynchronous. So you could do 2 things: Make it return Task<MobileServiceSoapClient> and await it. You could use a TaskCompletionSource<MobileServiceSoapClient> and set its result in the appropriate events/places. Add an Action<MobileServiceSoapClient> parameter to the method and invoke ...


0

In your case it could be: class Metronome { Action Ticked; internalMethod() { // bla bla Ticked(); } } I use below convention, self-describing. Events source: class Door { // case1: property "LockState" change // pattern: xxxChanged public Action<bool> LockStateChanged; // case2: pure action // pattern: ...


0

Depending on where you assign the delegate, your code might need to look like this: ClassB viewController = [ClassB new]; ClassA delegateStrongRef = [ClassA new] viewController.delegate = delegateStrongRef; // <-- you are missing this now; // Fixed: the ClassA object must be referenced strongly somewhere else // besides the (weak)delegate property, ...


0

you need just to comment this method in your view controller : (UIView *) tableView:(UITableView *)tableView viewForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section{ } and now the method (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView willDisplayHeaderView:(UIView *)view forSection:(NSInteger) will be called


1

The sound player doesn't implement the protocol it self, it has a delegate which implements the protocol. After all, it's the EOCSoundPlayerDelegate protocol. It is a very to have a delegate that conforms to a custom protocol like in that example. It leads to a nice loose coupling. The sound player only intends to call certain methods (only one method in ...


1

Rather than having an Event itself, could the intermediate class just pass the Add and Remove calls on to the lowest level class? I.e. public class Level1MessageHandler { public event EventHandler<MessageEventArgs> MessageReceived; } public class Level1SocketClient { Level1MessageHandler level1Handler; public event ...


1

When you're working with an array that's only partially filled, that indicates that you don't actually want an array, you want List<T>. Using that, you can have a collection that contains 8 items, but can be later expanded to 20 efficiently. And when you call Sort() on such list, you're not going to have any problems with nulls.


3

Even if you have a Tweet[] with 8 elements some can be null: Tweet[] twtArray = new Tweet[8]; // all instances are null You: The Tweet[] is of size 20 and I can see that there are 8 Tweet objects in there (with correct text and score values) in the first line of my code. So the array's size is 20 but only 8 are initialized? (see above) Array.Sort needs ...


1

If you're okay with using a little LINQ magic: c2.listOfLiterals = c2.listOfLiterals.Except(tempList).ToList(); Or loop over the tempList: foreach (var item in tempList) { c2.listOfLiterals.Remove(item); } You may need your literals class to implement IEqualityComparer<literal> and then provide an implementation for Equals and GetHashCode. ...


2

According to the docs, the delegate is called just before the navigation controller displays a viewController’s view and navigationItem properties. But, it appears that your question is, "how?". In your Storyboard or somewhere in code, the UINavigationController is set up. Wherever that is, it has a delegate property (a variable). That property is set to ...


1

Well it's probably something like this inside UINavigationController class: - (void)pushViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController animated:(BOOL)animated { [self.delegate navigationController:self willShowViewController:viewController animated:animated]; //do stuff to actually push the view controller } If the delegate is nil nothing ...



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