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90

More or less any use of member (ie. nested) types can give rise to a need for dependent method types. In particular, I maintain that without dependent method types the classic cake pattern is closer to being an anti-pattern. So what's the problem? Nested types in Scala are dependent on their enclosing instance. Consequently, in the absence of dependent ...


49

trait Graph { type Node type Edge def end1(e: Edge): Node def end2(e: Edge): Node def nodes: Set[Node] def edges: Set[Edges] } Somewhere else we can statically guarantee that we aren't mixing up nodes from two different graphs, e.g.: def shortestPath(g: Graph)(n1: g.Node, n2: g.Node) = ... Of course, this already worked if defined inside ...


7

It compiles using the Scala-2.10-M2 milestone, some dependent method type bugs have been fixed since the 2.9 release. I'm not completely sure, but perhaps this one might have made it work.


7

C#X means an X from any C. c.X means an X from your particular C, namely c. The latter is much more specific! For example, if X is a bill and c is a particular customer, c.X means that the method only accepts bills from (for, presumably) customer c. C#X means it accepts any bill from any customer. If you want to ensure that customers only get charged ...


5

This new feature is needed when concrete abstract type members are used instead of type parameters. When type parameters are used, the family polymorphism type dependency can be expressed in the latest and some older versions of Scala, as in the following simplified example. trait C[A] def f[M](a: C[M], b: M) = b class C1 extends C[Int] class C2 extends ...


3

This should work: case class companionApplier[U <: Universe](u: U) { ... } // in macro companionApplier[c.universe.type](c.universe) I had a similar question some months ago, see here.


3

How about splitting the structural type out as an auxiliary type and then sprinkling a little of my solution from the list, scala> trait Foo { trait Bar } defined trait Foo scala> val myFoo = new Foo {} ; val myBar = new myFoo.Bar {} myFoo: Foo = $anon$1@11247416 myBar: myFoo.Bar = $anon$2@70415924 scala> class Whatever6Aux[F <: Foo](val foo: ...


3

@Rex has given a good explanation of what's wrong. Here's how you might fix it ... If it's reasonable to be able to return x as a result of type c.X (ie. a value of the X type of the particular c passed as an argument, then you can tighten it's type as an argument, def bar[C <: Container](c: C)(x: c.X): c.X = x Now bar will only accept values of type ...


3

I'm developing a model for the interoption of a form of declarative programming with environmental state. The details aren't relevant here (e.g. details about callbacks and conceptual similarity to the Actor model combined with a Serializer). The relevant issue is state values are stored in a hash map and referenced by a hash key value. Functions input ...


2

c.X and C#X are definitely not the same -- if they were, why would both exist? Consider the case where you have a and b, different instances of C. By definition, a.X and b.X are different, but both are C#X.


1

The warnings are correct and to be expected because, as viewed from within foo, Y and Z will both have been erased to their bounds, ie. X. What's more surprising is that the presence of either the match against Y or the match against Z frustrate the match against X, ie. in this case, def foo(t: Module)(x: t.X): Unit = { import t._ // the output depends ...


1

The problem is in this matcher: intOrString match { case m.Left(i) => println("it's an int: "+i) case m.Right(s) => println("it's a string: "+s) } It unconditionally executes m.Left.unapply on the intOrString. As to why it does, see below. When you call foo(M2)(Right("quarante-deux")) this is what is happening: m.Left.unapply resolves to ...


1

See this thread on scala-internals, in particular, Adriaan's explanation.


1

Your apply method says the return type is T, that is type member Out is unspecified. The following specifies the type completely: trait T { type Out } object T { def apply[X]: T { type Out = X } = new T { type Out = X } } val t = T[Int] val i: t.Out = 5 // ok



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