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5

Your algorithm seems to work just fine, yielding correct results for smaller problem instances, like a 5x5 or 7x7 board. It seems like the 8x8 board is just too big for the brute force / backtracking approach. Still, you can simplify your findTour method, making it easier to understand and to debug: public boolean findTour(int x, int y, int c) { ...


4

Yes, a straightforward BFS can turn at any cell, while in this problem, you can turn only when you hit a wall. The problem can still be solved by a BFS on a modified graph. To simulate the constraint correctly, you can create auxiliary vertices from which you can move in only one direction. Alternatively, you can build another new graph with weighted ...


3

Though it seems that time complexity is O(N) but if you need to print all paths then it is O(N*logN). Suppose that u have a complete binary tree then the total paths will be N/2 and each path will have logN nodes so total of O(N*logN) in worst case.


3

Your algorithm looks correct, and the complexity should be O(n) because your helper function will run once for each node, and n is the number of nodes. Update: Actually, it would be O(N*log(N)) because each time the helper function runs, it might print a path to the console consisting of O(log(N)) nodes, and it will run O(N) times.


2

Your dfs method returns 0 except for leaf nodes. In addition, you seem to be mixing together a recursive and iterative approach. If you're using your own stack of unvisited nodes, you don't need to rely on the call stack provided by recursion. Basically, you need to visit each node. In each visit, you add the node's weight to a single sum, then add its ...


2

What are your reasons for assuming O((n^2)!) ? Since it is a classic recursion with backtracking I would, without having analyzed the problem in depth, think it is O(n^n). Try to make a counter which increments each time the function is recursively called. Then see if at the end of the algorithm it is closer to 387 420 489 (my guess) or 579 712 600 000 000 ...


1

The key problem with your algorithm is that you are representing your graph as a adjacency matrix. For V number of nodes, this will lead to O(V^2) runtime as you have to visit all V^2 entries of the matrix. Representing the graph using an adjacency list is more efficient (runtime and memory-wise). Runtime is O(E) where E is number of edges. # Run time is ...


1

Your question is rather vague and open-ended. Optimizing code can go so far as to implement it in a different language, so you will have to be a bit more precise about what you actually want to know. Suggesting that you rewrite the whole thing in C is probably not the answer you are looking for. Anyhow, since you are using an adjacency matrix, locating ...



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