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22

To understand how these instructions work, it helps to understand the basic execution architecture of GPUs and how fragment programs map to that architecture. GPUs run a bunch of threads in 'lock-step' over the same program, which each thread having its own set of registers. So it fetches an instruction, then executes that instruction N times, once for ...


10

Symbolic differentiation is less error prone than doing it by hand. For low orders I would not think that symbolic differentiation would take much computer time but you can readily time your specific situation to determine what it is using proc.time, system.time or the rbenchmark package. Also see these examples. You might want to try both symbolic and ...


9

I think you are looking for the derivative calculated in a point. If this is the case, here there is a simple way to do that. You need to know the derivative in a point, say a. It is given by the limit of the difference quotient for h->0: You actually need to implement the limit function. So you: Define an epsilon, set it more small to be more precise, ...


8

Assuming pH and time are plain vectors try this: library(pspline) predict(sm.spline(time, pH), time, 1)


7

There is quite a bit of theory (and established practice) in calculating numerical ("finite") derivatives. Getting all the details correct, such that you believe the result, is not trivial. If there's any way you can get the analytical derivative of the function (using pen and paper, or a computer algebra system such as Maple, Mathematica, Sage, or SymPy), ...


7

old_array.each_cons(2).map{|x, y| y - x} Enumerable#each_cons called with with a chunk size of 2 but without a block returns an Enumerator which will iterate over each pair of consecutive elements in old_array. Then we just use map to perform a subtraction on each pair.


7

sympy does it well.


7

library(Ryacas) x <- Sym("x") Simplify(deriv(sqrt(1 - x^2),x,2)) # return the result simplified gives expression((x^2 - 1 - x^2)/root(1 - x^2, 2)^3) You can also try PrettyForm(Simplify(deriv(sqrt(1 - x^2),x,2))) which gives 2 2 x - 1 - x --------------- 3 / 2 \ Sqrt\ 1 - x / As for numerical ...


6

I assume that you're trying to find the exact derivative of a function. (Symbolic differentiation) You need to parse the mathematical expression and store the individual operations in the function in a tree structure. For example, x + sin²(x) would be stored as a + operation, applied to the expression x and a ^ (exponentiation) operation of sin(x) and 2. ...


6

I can't think of a simpler way :) (and in 'answer' format, to please the trolls: "Yes")


6

Was also going to suggest an example of a smoothed spline fit followed by prediction of the derivative. In this case, the results are very similar to the diff calculation described by @dbaupp: spl <- smooth.spline(x, y=ycs) pred <- predict(spl) plot (x, ycs, log="xy") lines(pred, col=2) ycs.prime <- diff(ycs)/diff(x) pred.prime <- predict(spl, ...


6

You may solve problem with functional programmatic approach. As you know derivative defined as dF(X) = ( F(X+dX) - F(X) ) / dX Let's create generic function, which returns derivative functions: -module( calc ). -export( [ d/2 ] ). d( F, Dx ) -> fun( X ) -> ( F( X + Dx ) - F ( X ) ) / Dx end. Example of usage in ...


5

Yes it does make sense, it's known as Automatic Differentiation. There are one or two experimental compilers which can do this, for example NAGware's Differentiation Enabled Fortran Compiler Technology. And there are a lot of research papers on the topic. I suggest you get Googling.


5

First, it only makes sense to try to get the derivative of a pure function (one that does not affect external state and returns the exact same output for every input). Second, the type system of many programming languages involves a lot of step functions (e.g. integers), meaning you'd have to get your program to work in terms of continuous functions in ...


5

You might want to start with stats::deriv or diff.ts as Matt L suggested. Just keep in mind what a professor of mine used to tell all his students: numeric differentiation is known as "error multiplier." EDIT: To clarify -- what he was warning about was that any noise in your data can throw the derivative estimate way off. It's been said that ...


5

I also could not found a solution on the web today, so I tried to derive it. Firstly the notations of a 3D Perlin noise is defined. Notation Assume the 3D Perlin noise is computed by the trilinear interpolation as n = Lerp( Lerp( Lerp(dot000, dot100, u), Lerp(dot010, dot110, u), v), Lerp( ...


5

(Runge–Kutta in Haskell) You can use some numeric solver like Runge-Kutta -- define 4th order Runge-Kutta map (RK4) rk4 :: Floating a => (a -> a) -> a -> a -> a rk4 f h x = x + (1/6) * (k1 + 2*k2 + 2*k3 + k4) where k1 = h * f (x) k2 = h * f (x + 0.5*k1) k3 = h * f (x + 0.5*k2) ...


5

From the Notebook from the Fractional Derivatives page of MathWorld, this Mathematica code: FractionalD[nu_, f_, t_, opts___] := Integrate[(t - x)^(-nu - 1) (f /. t -> x), {x, 0, t}, opts]/Gamma[-nu] FractionalD[mu_?Positive, f_, t_, opts___] := Module[{m = Ceiling[mu]}, D[FractionalD[-(m - mu), f, t, opts], {t, m}] ]


5

You are looking for the numerical gradient I assume. t0 = 0; ts = pi/10; tf = 2*pi; t = t0:ts:tf; x = sin(t); dx = gradient(x)/ts The purpose of this function is a different one (vector fields), but it offers what diff doesn't: input and output vector of equal length. gradient calculates the central difference between data points. For an array, ...


4

A simple method is to compute the change in f over a small value for each point of the derivative you're interested in. For example, to compute ∂f/∂x, you could use this: epsilon = 1e-8 ∂f/∂x(x, y, z) = (f(x+epsilon,y,z) - f(x-epsilon, y, z))/(epsilon * 2); The other partials would be similar in y and z. The value chosen for epsilon depends on the ...


4

you need to remember your calculus. basically you need two things: table of derivatives of basic functions and rules of how to derivate compound expressions (like d(f + g)/dx = df/dx + dg/dx). Then take expressions parser and recursively go other the tree. (http://www.sosmath.com/tables/derivative/derivative.html)


4

If you are limited to polynomials (which appears to be the case), there would basically be three steps: Parse the input string into a list of coefficients to x^n Take that list of coefficients and convert them into a new list of coefficients according to the rules for deriving a polynomial. Take the list of coefficients for the derivative and create a nice ...


4

Parse your string into an S-expression (even though this is usually taken in Lisp context, you can do an equivalent thing in pretty much any language), easiest with lex/yacc or equivalent, then write a recursive "derive" function. In OCaml-ish dialect, something like this: let rec derive var = function | Const(_) -> Const(0) | Var(x) -> if x = ...


4

See Lambda the Ultimate discussions on Derivatives and dissections of data types and Derivatives of Regular Expressions


4

Your function is not a polynomial in s and s^(-1). The closest I could come to making sense of your question, would be to develop your expression into series around s==0 and then determine series coefficients. This can be done using SeriesCoefficient: In[80]:= SeriesCoefficient[ L0*s + (R1/(1 + R1*C1*s) + R3b + L3s + V3/s)/(R2a* L2a*(s/(R2a + ...


4

The standard optimize function should be sufficient for simple one-dimensional minimization: a <- 2 b <- 1 c <-1 func <- function(x){(a-b*x)^2/((2*b*x/(1+x))+c)} optimize(f=func, interval = c(-3,3)) $minimum [1] -0.3333377 $objective [1] -277201.4


4

The derivative of a function is dy/dx, which can be approximated by Δy/Δx, that is, "change in y over change in x". This can be written in R as ycs.prime <- diff(ycs)/diff(x) and now ycs.prime contains an approximation to the derivative of the function at each x: however it is a vector of length 999, so you will need to shorten x (i.e. use x[1:999] or ...


4

Generating derivatives from raw data is risky unless you are very careful. Not for nothing is this process known as "error multiplier." Unless you know the noise content of your data and take some action (e.g. spline) to remove the noise prior to differentiation, you may well end up with a scary curve indeed.


4

If you do not need interpolation, @lockedoff 's solution is fine, but are you sure you want 14 for both initial concentrations? To get better values, you should find the time of inclination, i.e. where the second derivative is zero. This can be tricky with real data, and you should plot the derivatives first to see if this is possible. You will note that ...


4

Edit #2: Following up on Greg Snow's excellent suggestion to use the analytical expression for the derivative of a Gaussian, and our conversation following his post, this will get you the exact slope at each of those points: s <- d$bw; slope2 <- sapply(x, function(X) {mean(dnorm(x - X, mean = 0, sd = s) * (x - X))}) ## And then, to compare to the ...



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