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3

Lazy loading design pattern: simple and prolific. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazy_loading


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By implementing IA and IB class AB can be used wherever IA or IB are expected: void doSomethingWithIA(IA item) { item.AMethod(); } ... AB ab = new AB(); doSomethingWithIA(ab); If AB had just the same Method names as IA and IB doSomethingWithIA() would not accept it as argument.


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I think your question is why do we even need an interface. One of the reasons I could think of is reducing the coupling between the classes. In Test driven development, interfaces help you lot to replace with mock objects. Check these links for more information. Why do we need interfaces in Java? ...


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Yes, the AB class could contain the A and the B objects as class members. The example in the image is kinda hard to picture in a 'real' example. I ususaly go after the rule: If it IS a [type], inherit. If it HAS a [type], member. Example. Cat is an Animal, so Cat inherit from Animal. Cat has a Tail, so Tail is a member of Cat. And as C# do not let ...


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No. Since an adapter pattern requires Object instances, and type-casting primitives uses no Object(s) at all, it isn't an Adapter pattern. Even if you cast between Object instances (which you could only do if they were in the same type-hierarchy), it would not be an adapter pattern. From the Wikipedia article (emphasis added), the adapter pattern is a ...


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No need to make the copy constructor (and assignment operator) private, as by default they would use shallow copy. However, why would you want to implement a copy constructor in a Singleton class? If you implement a copy constructor, and implement deep copying in it, and keep it public, well, then multiple objects of the class can be created. If you are ...


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That's wrong. If you receive a pointer to an internally allocated instance, you could still make a copy of it if the copy constructor is public. For example: Singleton * s = Singleton::getInstance(); Singleton copy = *s; // <-- invokes copy constructor Similar problem with the assignment operator: Singleton * s1 = Singleton::getInstance(); ...


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Here is my version: interface IGetById { T GetById<T>(object id); } interface IGetAll { IEnumerable<T> GetAll<T>(); } interface ISave { void Save<T>(T item) where T : IHasId; //you can go with Save<T>(object id, T item) if you want pure pure POCOs } interface IDelete { void Delete<T>(object id); } ...



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