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7

You will greatly improve testability by not using class methods here. Create a TwitterConnection protocol. Create a SystemTwitterConnection that conforms to it and manages things through ACAccountStore. Create a TestTwitterConnection that returns pre-set responses that you can configure for testing. You could even create a KeychainTwitterConnection to manage ...


6

You should declare variables at the smallest scope possible. So if a local variable works, stick with the local variable (Option 1). Only if you cannot do what you want to do with a local variable, consider a field or property.


5

The GenericBuilder The idea for building mutable objects (immutable objects are addressed later on) is to use method references to setters of the instance that should be build. This leads us to a generic builder that is capable of building every pojo with a default constructor - one builder to rule them all ;-) The implementation is this: public class ...


5

ArrayLists are not immutable, even if they're declared as final; that just means that variable cannot change, but its contents can. See: Why can final object be modified? Since you're using Lists.newArrayList, it looks like you're using Guava. Guava has a great solution to this issue: ImmutableList. So your code would be: public static final ...


4

You need to set the scaleType to centerInside and the adjustViewBounds to true like this: (adjust view bounds should get rid of the space you don't want.) <ImageView ... android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:scaleType="centerInside" android:adjustViewBounds="true" />


4

Imagine you want to implement a sort-of NumberBucket that is like a collection for numbers. You could create a somewhat fat interface like this one: public interface INumberBucket { void Add(int number); void Remove(int number); } And you could implement it with no problems: public class NumberBucket : INumberBucket { public void Add(int ...


4

I think the cleanest way is using a X Macro implementation: #define MEMBERS \ X(member1) X(member2) #define X(m) MemberType m; MEMBERS #undefine X #define X(m) set<MemberType*> m; MEMBERS #undefine X #define X(m) m.push_back(&(currentBlock.m)); MEMBERS #undefine X If you would like the members to have different types you can change it to: ...


4

I'm ignorant of Slovak, I am sorry. But the Slovak collation utf8_slovak_ci treats the Slovak letter č as distinct from c. (Do the surnames starting with Č all come after those starting with C in your telephone directories? They probably do. The creators of MySQL certainly think they do.) The collation utf8_general_ci treats č and c the same. Here's a ...


4

In Pixels: 22 × 22 area in 24 × 24 (mdpi) 33 × 33 area in 36 × 36 (hdpi) 44 × 44 area in 48 × 48 (xhdpi) 66 × 66 area in 72 × 72 (xxhdpi) 88 × 88 area in 96 × 96 (xxxhdpi) as seen on http://iconhandbook.co.uk/reference/chart/android/


3

Having too many classes should not be a bigger concern than having too much complexity in the class that you do define. Keep the responsibilities of your classes simple. Ideally your POCOs should not contain CRUD methods. And in your example, your crud method there is an instance method, which means that you would have to instantiate an AccountModel to ...


3

You could introduce other methods as alias for apply. object Foo { def apply(): Foo = ??? def mkInstance(): Foo = apply() } trait Foo Foo.mkInstance() // searchable It's just very idiosyncratic, so perhaps you should clarify to yourself why it is so important to find instantiations?


3

They are not available because you're only projecting rule.Evaluations in your final SelectMany. You could build up an anonymous type: foreach(var eval in customTrackerDocuments.SelectMany(doc => doc.Rules, rule => new {doc, rule}) .SelectMany(docrule => docrule.rule.Evaluations, eval => new ...


3

Customizing window frame (including title, minimize, maximize and close buttons) is limited and generally depends on capabilities of the window system. However, you can always hide system window frame and construct your own custom frame using Qt widgets. You can turn off the close button using window flags. You can make the window white by changing its ...


3

Which solution is best depends on how you define the choices in your UI. The simplest way to define the possible choices is with an enum. If you go that route, I would suggest using an EnumMap to Map the type to the action, or (assuming the actions are mutable or need to be created per request) an action factory. For example: EnumMap<Type, ...


3

No, As per state pattern, on the bases of state, substituting classes change the behavior of the object. But in the thread we do not define any substituting class corresponding to the states New, Runnable, Running and Dead. So thread is not an example of State pattern.


3

Yes. No. Maybe. The answer to your question depends on several things that you don't mention in the question. The first thing to note is that the query in VKP's answer is quite sufficient under most circumstances. Second, if country is a full country name, then storing the full country name (which can be rather long) may greatly expand the size of the ...


3

You should abstract the FaceBookAccount and the TwitterAccount to instances of SocialMediaAccount Haskell Code: import Control.Applicative ((<$>)) import Data.List import Data.Ord import Data.Time data FaceBookAccount = FaceBookAccount [FaceBookPost] data TwitterAccount = TwitterAccount [TwitterPost] data FaceBookPost = FaceBookPost String ...


3

I implemented three possible solutions that may help you decide what better fits your requirements. Solution 1: Existential Types {-# LANGUAGE ExistentialQuantification #-} import Data.Time data FacebookAccount = FacebookAccount [FacebookPost] data TwitterAccount = TwitterAccount [TwitterPost] data FacebookPost = FacebookPost String UTCTime deriving ...


3

You've got it a bit wrong. Prototype is used to create new instances, Flyweight is used to allow sharing of instances. Not the best example, but game-wise Prototype would mean that you have an EnemyPrototype (or several) and you create a new enemy from that. In a naive implementation this would duplicate all the data, including the graphics. So for 100 ...


3

Here's the complete solution which does not include third-party libraries like ANTLR or JavaCC. Note that while it's extensible, its capabilities are still limited. If you want to create much more complex expressions, you'd better use grammar generator. First, let's write a tokenizer which splits the input string to the tokens. Here's the token types: ...


2

Following may help: template<typename ... Ts> struct BlockFactoryT; template<typename ... Ts> struct BlockT { using Factory = BlockFactoryT<Ts...>; BlockT(){...} std::tuple<Ts...> members; }; template<Ts...> struct BlockFactoryT{ using Block = BlockT<Ts...>; std::tuple<set<Ts*>> ...


2

Separate the generation of XML in-memory from persisting it to disk. Keep a dictionary from fully-qualified class names to hashes. On your first run, the dictionary will start out empty. When it is time to ensure that a class's corresponding XML is up to date on disk, generate its XML in-memory, hash that, and check the hash against the dictionary. If ...


2

Your business model should work only with the business model. You need a 'read' model but specific for the business side. This is not the same query/read model used for UI, reporting. Business logic rules are always part of the business layer, the command part. They can be part of a business object or a service (which usually is a command handler). A ...


2

Gtkmm uses the sigc++ library to take care of all of this for you. There is no need to write it yourself. Documentation links: Signals overview Appendix with detailed information So, in this case, I would use something like button.signal_clicked().connect(sigc::mem_fun(container, &containerClass::clickHandler)); while making sure that ...


2

Let's say you have a class that parses HTML files to make sure they are valid. It looks like this: public class Parser { public Parser(string filePath) { ... } public void Parse() { ... } public bool IsValid() { ... } } And let's say you are using it in an application. The application code ...


2

It appears you are deriving from an abstract class to inherit default implementations. Don't misuse inheritance for code reuse. Inheritance is for creating substitutability. Create yourself a few helper methods. That way you can create just the methods you want to expose.


2

It's isParsingNeeded, but the question should be closed, because it's opinion based. Or getNeedParse. Edit, after comments: There are three separate issues: the JavaBeans specification says you can use either get or is. The base form is get, is is only for cases when it sounds better. Both names will work with all tools. Hence isNeedParse is technically ...


2

Just search for Something(, it'll find both constructors and apply calls (unless there is a no-argument constructor or a single-argument constructor someone uses without parentheses, in which case you'll have to look at all uses of Something). You'll just have to filter out class ... extends Something(...), which should be trivial.


2

Not sure about your backend but it seems like you are looking for a single page app solution. I recommend AngularJS, currently maintained by Google.


2

Others have mentioned Angular, but I'll just throw out the recommendation of KnockoutJS as well. Knockout has a less steep learning curve than AngularJS, and though it doesn't have as many features as Angular does, the latest version does have better browser support. Both Knockout and Angular have excellent documentation and tutorials available via their ...



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