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5

From the Python documentation: Objects are never explicitly destroyed; however, when they become unreachable they may be garbage-collected. An implementation is allowed to postpone garbage collection or omit it altogether — it is a matter of implementation quality how garbage collection is implemented, as long as no objects are collected that are ...


1

For your code to work, class C must be moveable. When it has no declared destructor, it gets a compiler-generated implicit move constructor (and move assignment operator). But when it has a declared ("custom" in your parlance) destructor, the move constructor (and move assignment operator) are no longer provided implicitly. This is for your safety: it is ...


1

I think what you are looking for is templating. Let's define a generic templated function that works for any types template <typename BaseDomainType_T, unsigned int PrefixID> void deleteObject(unsigned int ObjID) { if (ObjID == PrefixID) { NodeManagerRoot* pNodeManagerRoot = NodeManagerRoot::CreateRootNodeManager(); auto ...


2

You can't avoid that. This is simply how a vector works. It's a contiguous array. The only way you can insert a new element into a contiguous array is to move the old elements down. That means using move assignment to move them into their new positions. So if you have the following vector, and their contents: [5][12][16] If you insert after the second ...


0

I think you will get access violation at the end of your program. Assuming the instance is a static variable. The destructor will attempt to delete a static variable.


0

Class members are constructed in a sequence they are defined in class. That means, class Demonstration { XClass x; YClass y; }; In above example, x will be constructed before y. As destruction happens in reverse order of construction, y will always be destructed before x.


1

Is this the normal behavior? Yes. Subobject destructors are called by the destructor of the container class. In particular, the subobjects will be destroyed after the body of the container classes destructor has been executed. Because the functionality for some functions is already destroyed in my Base Class destructor and the Inner classes rely ...


1

Using this code: #include <iostream> class Base { public: class Sub1 { public: Sub1() { std::cout << "Base::Sub1::Constructed\n"; } ~Sub1() { std::cout << "Base::Sub1::Destroyed\n"; ...


6

m =new Monster[3]; Here three objects are created, default constructor was called for each of them. That's why you see messages with out argument. m[i] = i; First, temporary Monster is created on right-hand-side by using Monster(int) constructor. That's why you see message Monster created. Next, assignment operator is called. Next, your temporary ...


0

Using the placement feature of new operator, you can create the object in place and avoid copying: placement (3) :void* operator new (std::size_t size, void* ptr) noexcept; Simply returns ptr (no storage is allocated). Notice though that, if the function is called by a new-expression, the proper initialization will be performed (for class ...


0

Here is some sample code that does an insertion sort which updates if the item is already present. void insert( std::string bt, int bq, double bp) { auto pred = []( Book const& lhs, Book const& rhs ){ return lhs.title < rhs.title; }; auto book = Book(bt, bq, bp); auto pos = std::lower_bound( BL.begin(), BL.end(), book, pred ); ...


2

From the C++11 specification (ISO/IEC 14882:2011(E)), section 12.4 Destructors [class.dtor]: Sub-section 4: If a class has no user-declared destructor, a destructor is implicitly declared as defaulted (8.4). An implicitly-declared destructor is an inline public member of its class. Sub-section 6: A destructor that is defaulted and not defined as ...


2

This has nothing to do with virtual inheritance. Deleting via a pointer to type T other than the originally allocated type D is Undefined Behavior unless the type T is a base class of D and has a virtual destructor. C++14 (as in N3936 draft) §5.3.5/3 ” … if the static type of the object to be deleted is different from its dynamic type, ...


2

first delete single elements, then delete[] the container Graph::~Graph { for (int i=0; i<capacity; i++) if (list[i]) delete list[i]; delete[] list; } obligatory: consider using std::vector and/or std::shared_ptr if you can use c++11, it would be much much better


0

The role of __del__ is not to delete the object: it is called before the object is automatically deleted. Therefore it's fine if your parent class doesn't define __del__. Feel free not to call super().__del__() if it's bugging you. For the record, the reason why objects don't have a default __del__ is that objects with __del__ were not garbage collected in ...


4

The class you're deriving from doesn't have __del__(). So trying to call it is an error. Now, if you expect your class to be used in a multiple inheritance scenario, the next class in the method resolution order (MRO) might not actually be your class's parent. And that class, whatever it is, might have a __del__() method. So, if you're concerned about that ...


4

No, after abc's destructor ran, its members will be destroyed in reverse order of their declaration. When abc is deleted, all its memory is free'd. That includes my_def in your example. Maybe this question will be useful to you: What is a smart pointer and when should I use one? Addendum: One major problem with C++ is undefined behavior. Programming errors ...


3

You have to see to it, that you hook all your widgets into Qt's object tree, which will then take care of destruction for you. You can do that by giving it a parent when constructing it. Like you did with the SignalMapper.


3

From QWidget::setLayout: The QWidget will take ownership of layout. From QLayout::addItem (called by QLayout::addWidget): Note: The ownership of item is transferred to the layout, and it's the layout's responsibility to delete it. You don't have to clean up anything. Manage the widgets through the layout(addWidget, removeWidget/removeItem).


5

With Qt classes that receive parent as arguments to their constructors, e.g QSignalMapper, it is important to note that the class adds itself to its parent's object list, and it will be destructed when its parent (a QObject) is destructed. Therefore, if you pass an object a parent, you don't have to do anything. You might have an empty destructor in your ...


5

Your code failed to trace the copy constructor. You need to do this to get a better picture of when an object is created. #include <iostream> using namespace std; class A { public: A() { cout<<"cons"<<endl; } ~A() { cout<<"dest"<<endl; } A(const &A) { cout << "copy constructed" << endl;} }; A ...


0

If you have optimization turned on then you get this output because of compiler optimization Copy Elision enter link description here Or if you run your program in debug mode (without optimization), you don't simply trace copy constructor that is used as @PaulMcKenzie explained. You can try compile without optimization: /Od (in visual studio), -O0 in gcc. ...


0

As was pointed out, you were missing an assignment operator, however the assignment operator you eventually posted is not correct since it only does a shallow copy and produces a memory leak since you failed to delete the previously allocated memory. To overcome all of this, a correct assignment operator would look like this using the copy/swap idiom: ...


0

If you can use C++11, you may want to read about move constructors. This may help you understand the problem better, or avoid it. When you push_back an instance, it will copy it. emplace_back (C++11) can allow you to construct in-place, or alternatively a move constructor can allow you to just move the owned data. Your log shows 35 and 36 both being ...


1

When a local variable goes out of scope there is an implicit destructor call. If the destructor is not accessible from that scope, it can't be called.


0

I'm only going to address your specific question of Is that possible to delete an array of classes in C++ without calling their destructors? The short answer is yes. The long answer is yes, but there's caveats and considering specifically what a destructor is for (i.e. resource clean up), it's generally a bad idea to avoid calling a class destructor. ...


1

One simple way to deallocate without calling destructors is to separate allocation and initialization. When you take proper care of alignment you can use placement new (or the functionality of a standard allocator object) to create the object instances inside the allocated block. Then at the end you can just deallocate the block, using the appropriate ...


2

Perhaps you want ::operator delete[](arr). (See http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/new/operator_delete) But this still has undefined behaviour, and is a terrible idea.


2

You have a problem right here: Egg& Egg::operator=(const Egg& rhs) { name = rhs.name; ... } Egg::~Egg() { ... delete[] name; } After Egg egg1, egg2; egg1 = egg2; you have name as the same value in both egg1 and egg2. When destructors of them are going to be called, it is going to be deleted twice - and this is a straight road ...


2

You're doing this in the wrong place. You should override the OnFormClosing method or set up a handler for the OnClosing event. The reason for this is that you don't need any random weirdness in the user interface -- the logging you're trying to do should happen between the time the program (or the user) invokes the "close", but before the form ...


0

Try making it async. ~ProgramWizardViewModel() { if ((Program.Errors.Count > 0) && (WizardData?.User != null)) { string errorsText = string.Format(string.Join("\n", Program.Errors)); WizardData.client.UploadExceptionReport(errorsText).Wait(); } } And public async Task ...


0

I think what people are failing to recognize is that since Java does not have a destructor method, the programmer needs think differently about resource ownership. For example: The following class maintains ownership of a resource (in this case a database connection). public class Database { Connection conn = null; public void getConnection(String ...


0

You are deleting an array of pointers and keys, whereas you never defined these to be arrays. Both of these are pointers. You need to be freeing memory from the pointers, not arrays. Try this:- delete myPointer; myPointer = NULL; NOTE: If you're using C++, read about smart pointers. They'll come in handy!


1

Here a version which will really call all destructors including arrays: void ArrayDeleter(Test *t) { delete[] t; }; int main() { vector<shared_ptr<Test> > tVec; tVec.push_back(make_shared<Test>()); tVec.push_back(make_shared<Test>()); tVec.insert(tVec.end(), make_shared<Test>()); ...


3

(Formally the behaviour of your program is undefined: you must never mix new[] with delete: every new must be balanced with a delete, and every new[] balanced with delete[].) The interaction of it = tVec.erase(it); with the it++ in the for loop is giving you gyp. (The iterator returned by erase is already the next one). You're missing out every other ...


3

A compiler-generated copy constructor is being used, which doesn't increment k. Include that explicitly in your source code, and all will be well.


4

You're making copies, but your trace output doesn't show that (and your k doesn't get incremented when it happens). So the "extra" destructor calls go with copy constructions. You can remove one of the copies by using emplace properly: test.emplace(test.end()); // ^ no A() here; that would be like doing test.push_back(A(A())) but you ...


0

This would have to be a compiler bug, potentially related to the fact that it allows that reference initialisation in the first place (which is a Visual Studio extension, not compliant to any version of the actual, standardised, C++ language). I believe I can reproduce this using an online VS compiler: C++ compilers are allowed to elide copy operations ...


-2

Is GearBox instantiated? Car::Car(): speed(0), gearBox(GearBox()) { cout << "Car constructor" << endl; }  ↓ Car::Car(): speed(0) { static GearBox inst;     gearBox = inst; cout << "Car constructor" << endl; } EDIT: class Car { private: int speed; class GearBox { // referable private: int gear; ...


8

It is not the question of having point. You simply can't deallocate memory which you didn't allocate. delete [] myBoxArray; // Delete array has Undefined Behavior (UB), where anything or nothing can happen. You can only delete something which you did new, and you can only delete[] something which you did new[]. Any violations to this rule will make the ...


2

Your function Eq takes two Stac objects by value bool Eq(Stac a, Stac b) Therefore a and b will be function local copies of your inputs. Therefore after the function ends, they will fall out of scope and their destructors will be called. To avoid making local copies, pass the objects by const& bool Eq(Stac const& a, Stac const& b)


1

The solution here is to implement destructors in the classes that need them and let the compiler handle the rest. First of all, C has some data that needs to be freed, so C gets a destructor like this: class C{ int* cp; public: C(){ cp = new int;} virtual ~C(){ delete cp; cout << "~C()" << endl; } ...



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