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27

What you are experiencing is called Spectral Leakage. This is caused because the underlying mathematics of the Fourier transform assumes a continuous function from -infinity to + infinity. So the range of samples you provide is effectively repeated an infinite number of times. If you don't have a complete number of cycles of the waveform in the window the ...


27

There are two issues: the way you use the FFT, and the particular filter. Filtering is traditionally implemented as convolution in the time domain. You're right that multiplying the spectra of the input and filter signals is equivalent. However, when you use the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) (implemented with a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm for ...


12

Actually, you don't have to swap the different quadrants, it's needed only if you're a human and want a more natural looking visualization of the FFT result (i.e. with the 0 frequency in the middle, negative frequencies left/bottom and positive frequencies up/right). To invert the FFT, you need to pass the result of the forward transform "as is" (or after ...


11

For a straightforward and easy to use FFT implementation try KissFFT. If you need absolute maximum performance though, and don't mind a little complexity, then it has to be FFTW.


10

Your primary issue is that frequencies aren't well defined over short time intervals. This is particularly true for low frequencies, which is why you notice the problem most there. Therefore, when you take really short segments out of the sound train, and then you filter these, the filtered segments wont filter in a way that produces a continuous ...


8

Better indentation would go a long way. I fixed that for you. Also, this seems to beg for better locality of the variables. The variable names are not clear to me, but that might be because I don't know the domain this algorithm belongs to. Generally, if you want to make complex code easier to understand, identify sub-algorithms and put them into their own ...


8

I have used both (OpenCV and FFTW) and you can expect FFTW to be faster than the simpler implementation in OpenCV (how much depends a lot on your processor and image sizes of course). However, if you plan on using your software commercially FFTW has a rather expensive license ($7500.00). In the commercial case, I would recommend Intel's IPP over FFTW as the ...


7

In order to compute the linear convolution using DFT, you need to post-pad both signals with zeros, otherwise the result would be the circular convolution. You don't have to manually pad a signal though, fft2 can do it for you if you add additional parameters to the function call, like so: fft2(X, M, N) This pads (or truncates) signal X to create an ...


7

I don't think this is built in. However, direct calculation is straightforward: import numpy as np def DFT_matrix(N): i, j = np.meshgrid(np.arange(N), np.arange(N)) omega = np.exp( - 2 * pi * 1J / N ) W = np.power( omega, i * j ) / sqrt(N) return W EDIT For a 2D FFT matrix, you can use the following: x = np.zeros(N, N) # x is any input ...


7

Be careful, you are not computing the continuous time Fourier transform, computers work with discrete data, so does Numpy, if you take a look to numpy.fft.fft documentation it says: numpy.fft.fft(a, n=None, axis=-1)[source] Compute the one-dimensional discrete Fourier Transform. This function computes the one-dimensional n-point discrete ...


7

It's Vf = fftshift(fft(ifftshift(V))); That is, you need ifftshift in time-domain so that samples are interpreted as those of a symmetric function, and then fftshift in frequency-domain to again make symmetry apparent. This only works for N odd. For N even, the concept of a symmetric function does not make sense: there is no way to shift the signal so ...


7

For each frequency bin, the magnitude sqrt(re^2 + im^2) tells you the amplitude of the component at the corresponding frequency. The phase atan2(im, re) tells you the relative phase of that component. The real and imaginary parts on their own are not particularly useful.


6

What you want to do is find peaks with high contrast. Thus, you need a way to identify local maxima, plus a way to measure the difference between the peak and the surrounding values. Thresholding on this difference will identify the impulse peaks for you. Assuming your input signal is called signal %# dilate to find, for every pixel, the maximum of its ...


6

A DFT is a linear operator. Some neural networks have a sigmoid or other non-linear element in the computation path, which might make it harder to simulate a linear operator closely enough. Added: A full DFT is an N by N matrix multiplication. A neural net has to be big enough to represent that many multiplications (at minimum O(NlogN)).


6

The X axis is dimensionless. To get the correspondence between bin index and frequency you need to know (a) the sample rate (in Hz), Fs, and (b) the number of points in the FFT, N. The centre frequency for the bin is then: f = i * Fs / N where f is the bin frequency in Hz and i is the bin index. See this answer for a more complete explanation.


6

You need to find the peak magnitude then work out the corresponding frequency: calculate the magnitude of each DFT output bin: magnitude = sqrt(re*re+im*im) find the bin with the largest magnitude, call its index i_max. calculate the equivalent frequency of this bin: freq = i_max * Fs / N, here Fs = sample rate (Hz) and N = no of points in FFT. See this ...


6

Oh, you're using the R2C mode (don't know why I didn't think of that before). That only writes n/2 + 1 results, because of the symmetry. This behaviour is documented: http://www.fftw.org/doc/One_002dDimensional-DFTs-of-Real-Data.html.


6

You're allocating an array of fftw_complexes, which consist of two elements — the real and complex components — but you're only initializing the real component of each sample. This is probably leaving the complex components containing random data, causing unexpected crazy results! If you don't need to deal with complex samples — which is likely — you may ...


6

I assume 1D DFT/IDFT ... All DFT's use this formula: X(k) is transformed sample value (complex domain) x(n) is input data sample value (real or complex domain) N is number of samples/values in your dataset This whole thing is usually multiplied by normalization constant c. As you can see for single value you need N computations so for all samples it ...


6

The easiest and most likely the fastest method would be using fft from SciPy. import scipy as sp def dftmtx(N): return sp.fft(sp.eye(N)) If you know even faster way (might be more complicated) I'd appreciate your input. Just to make it more relevant to the main question - you can also do it with numpy: import numpy as np dftmtx = ...


6

The ' operator is for the complex transpose, which means that the matrix is transposed and the conjugate of the values is taken. This means that the signs of the complex values are reversed. You don't notice this with real numbers because technically, the imaginary component is zero. You want to use .' instead to preserve the sign of the imaginary ...


5

Do not compress your code. Please? Pretty please? With a cherry on top? Unless you can create a better algorithm, compressing an existing piece of code will only make it look like something straight out of the gates of Hell itself. No one would be able to understand it. You would not be able to understand it, even a few days later. Even the compiler might ...


5

DFT and FFT are essentially the same for the purposes of this question. To attenuate a frequency bin (or "band") in an FFT-transformed array, you need to multiply both the real and imaginary components by the same factor, and also multiply the real and imaginary components of the corresponding negative frequency bin. FFT produces a transformed pair of ...


5

Look at this number (6.12303176911e-17+1j) 6.12303176911e-17 = 0.0000000000000000612303176911 which is really small (close to zero). What you are seeing is rounding errors due to the limited representation of floating point numbers The error is equivalent to measuring the distance to the sun to within 10 microns or so. If you're running FFTs on data from ...


5

Here's cube roots of unity and 4th roots for a usage example. The input array should be interpreted as polynomial coefficients. >>> import numpy as np >>> np.roots([1, 0, 0, -1]) array([-0.5+0.8660254j, -0.5-0.8660254j, 1.0+0.j ]) >>> np.roots([1, 0, 0, 0, -1]) array([ -1.00000000e+00+0.j, 5.55111512e-17+1.j, ...


5

No, the FFT is not a way to calculate the Fourier transform (FT) of an array. The FFT is a fast algorithm to calculate the DFT, discrete Fourier transform. The DFT and the FT are 2 different things, and you can't use the DFT to calculate the FT. See this link on their differences. If your function is periodic, then its spectrum is a function defined only ...


5

I believe where you are stuck is that the Gaussian filter supplied by OpenCV is created in the spatial (time) domain, but you want the filter in the frequency domain. Here is a nice article on the difference between high and low-pass filtering in the frequency domain. Once you have a good understanding of how frequency domain filtering works, then you are ...


4

Importing a class isn't the same as inheriting from it. It just means that the source file knows about that type. If you're going to call foo.hasNextLine() and expect the Scanner.hasNextLine() method to be called, then the type of foo must either be Scanner or some subclass. Your StdIn class doesn't extend Scanner - it contains a Scanner. So one option ...


4

You could use a complex number class to reflect the math involved. A good part of the code is made of two complex multiplications. You can rewrite your code as : unsigned long mmax=2; while (n>mmax) { unsigned long istep = mmax<<1; const complex wp = coef( mmax ); complex w( 1. , 0. ); for (unsigned long m=1; m < mmax; m += 2) ...


4

This is due to complex conjugate symmetry that is present in the output of an FFT. Intel IPP has a good description of this packing (the same packing is used by OpenCV). The OpenCV dft function also describes this packing. So, from the gpu::dft documentation we have: If the source matrix is complex and the output is not specified as real, the ...



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