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103

Ok, they're fundamentally a pretty simple idea. A DHT gives you a dictionary-like interface, but the nodes are distributed across the network. The trick with DHTs is that the node that gets to store a particular key is found by hashing that key, so in effect your hash-table buckets are now independent nodes in a network. This gives a lot of fault-tolerance ...


31

With trackerless/DHT torrents, peer IP addresses are stored in the DHT using the BitTorrent infohash as the key. Since all a tracker does, basically, is respond to put/get requests, this functionality corresponds exactly to the interface that a DHT (distributed hash table) provides: it allows you to look up and store IP addresses in the DHT by infohash. So ...


27

When a BitTorrent client connects to DHT, there is an initial place that it goes to find peers. With the original BitTorrent client, there was a url to bitorrent.com that would help get things started. I tried looking up the reference but I couldn't find it. Once you've established connections with other clients, then you can do an announce on the DHT ...


25

The mainline DHT bootstrap nodes are router.utorrent.com and a CNAME to it, router.bittorrent.com. Port 6881.


21

You can use the hexdigest() method to get hexadecimal digits, and then convert them to a number: >>> h = hashlib.md5('data') >>> int(h.hexdigest(), 16) 188041611063492600696317361555123480284L If you already have the output of digest(), you can convert it to hexadecimal digits: >>> hexDig = ''.join('%02x' % ord(x) for x in ...


16

the graph at the bottom of this DHT monitoring project site shows dht.transmissionbt.com router.utorrent.com router.bittorrent.com as bootstrapping peers


13

For the most part, when you start a bittorrent client, bootstrap off of: nodes from your last session, that were saved to disk other peers that you have on any of the swarms you're on There are a few well-known bootstrap nodes which clients can use if they have no other means of finding any. Essentially the only case this happens is when you install a ...


12

The bittorrent DHT can be bootstrapped in many ways. It just needs the IP and Port of any other reachable DHT node out there. Current clients generally use several of the following strategies: bootstrap from a cache of long-lived nodes from a previous session use a DNS A/AAAA record mapping to a known node (e.g. router.bittorrent.com or ...


11

In BiTTorrent, you have three main options: Torrent File: some torrent files can embed nodes for you to link into the DHT with (in fact, it's recommended when making a torrent file) Hardcoding: Some torrent clients hard code a few bootstrap nodes (like the ones mentioned by stk). These are usually run by companies and organizations with long-running ...


10

In my job I'm working with entagled. I can't say it's great code, but it seems to be the only Kademlia implementation for Python around. I think Kademlia has become the default DHT for most applications today, because it's quite simple and has fast lookups. At least in the academic world that I've seen so far.


9

Hazelcast is an open source, transactional, distributed caching solution for Java. Good fit for financial applications. It is released under Apache license. Hazelcast is actually a little more than a distributed cache; it is distributed implementation of queue, topic, map, multimap, lock, executor service for Java.


9

The main reason is that you rapidly query many nodes that you have never established contact to before and possibly will never see again during a lookup. Kademlia lookups are iterative, i.e. requests won't be forwarded. A forwarding DHT would be more suited to long-standing TCP connections. I.e. a large chunk of the traffic consists a short-lived exchange ...


9

I don't have specific insight into BTDigg, but I believe the claim that there is not database (or something that acts like a database) is a false statement. The author of that article might have been referring to something more specific that you might encounter in a traditional torrent site, where actual .torrent files are stored for instance. This is how a ...


8

Take a look at Ayende's Rhino DHT. Might be more inline with what you are looking for. The source can be acquired here.


7

If you are focused on implementation, rather than looking for an out-of-the-box solution, this article might help a bit: http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/6797


7

You should think of the initial hash as just bytes, not a number. If you're trying to order them for indexed lookup, use whatever ordering is simplest to implement - there's no general purpose "right" or "conventional" here, really. If you've got some specific hash table you want to be "compatible" with (not even sure what that would mean) you should see ...


6

The general theory can be found in wikipedia's article on Kademlia. The specific protocol specification used in bittorrent is here: http://wiki.theory.org/BitTorrentDraftDHTProtocol


6

DHTs provide the same type of interface to the user as a normal hashtable (look up a value by key), but the data is distributed over an arbitrary number of connected nodes. Wikipedia has a good basic introduction that I would essentially be regurgitating if I write more - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distributed_hash_table


6

DHT responses are always sent to the same port the query was sent from. If you're not getting a response from router.utorrent.com, it could be because it's temporarily down or because its network interface is saturated (last time I checked it was handling 6000 requests per second, iirc). If you only sent a single message, it could have been lost in the ...


6

The kademlia paper actually calls out the optimization of dynamically splitting buckets as the routing table grows. There is no logic difference between these two approaches, it's just an optimization to save some space. When implementing a fixed full sized routing table, you have to find k nodes to send requests to. If the bucket your target falls in is ...


6

To implement a DHT node, you probably want to read the DHT specification: http://www.bittorrent.org/beps/bep_0005.html It describes the message format. If you're not familiar with the underlying DHT, you probably need to read the kademlia paper as well: http://www.cs.rice.edu/Conferences/IPTPS02/109.pdf Once you're up and running on the DHT, and you ...


5

A lot of financial institutions are using Oracle Coherence for this. It won't match all the points on your list though.


5

Maybe JDHT will fit the bill. I haven't checked it out myself, but it's written at a university, sometimes that means it's simple and used for teaching. :-)


5

The short answer is: one of them. Each request is expected to yield a single response. DHT nodes are assumed to have a persistent node-ID associated with their (IP, port)-pair. If the node ID changes (or as you phrase it, a different node responds) its entry in the remote node's routing table is likely to be removed and replaced by the new node ID. It is ...


5

The v field is optional and indicates which client and version is running the DHT node. The ones that start with "UT" is uTorrent, followed by one byte indicating the major version and another byte for minor version. Other possible values are: "Az" - Azureus (or Vuze) "LT" - libtorrent (rasterbar) "MP" - MooPolice "GR" - GetRight "MO" - Monotorrent


5

Why UDP? Because, it is simple, effective and low-cost protocol. It does not guarantee delivery of the package and does not require to establish a constant connection. All these features make UDP fit for fast data delivery to multiple recipients. That's all you need to P2P-applications. –°itation from Kademlia's Design Specification: Kademlia's designers ...


5

Transmission uses a hardcoded bootstrap node for dht if there is no other way to get peers: bootstrap_from_name( "dht.transmissionbt.com", 6881, bootstrap_af(session) ); I guess each torrent client uses their own bootstrap node.


5

I think I got it. The common prefix same bucket thing is indeed directly related to the xor values, so its indeed sorting them. I found those slides pretty helpful: http://heim.ifi.uio.no/michawe/teaching/p2p-ws08/p2p-5-6.pdf


4

I believe, JBoss Cache is a good enough for your purposes: fast distributed transactional with MVCC implementation (no read locking) supports JTA supports asynchronous mode eviction data to persistent storage (jdbc, bdb, etc)


4

What happens with bittorrent and a DHT is that at the beginning bittorrent uses information embedded in the torrent file to go to either a tracker or one of a set of nodes from the DHT. Then once it finds one node, it can continue to find others and persist using the DHT without needing a centralized tracker to maintain it. The original information ...



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