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61

From the UML Sheet of Special Objects (left toolbar, center palette, use drop-down to select "UML"), select the UML Object object, , and then place an object in your diagram. Next, from the same UML Sheet, select the lifeline object, , and place it in your diagram. Then connect the lifeline's uppermost line handle to the UML Object placed in the last step. ...


10

The dashed line is the lifeline (see here for an explanation). What you want to do is extend the execution occurrence (the wide rectangle). To do this, right click on the occurrence and select "Add connection points".


9

Based on the "alt" box depicted in the IBM link given by @luistm, I was able to replicate something similar in Dia: The "alt" box was drawn with the UML Large Package object. (The Small Package doesn't allow you to resize it.) The condition labels are just Text objects (found on the upper [static] pane in the left toolbar, marked with the T). The ...


6

You have two choices: a) Add your PNG as a an image to your Dia diagram - see http://dia-installer.de/doc/en/basic-objects-chapter.html#image Once you've done that, you can "draw over" the image. Place a white rectangle over parts that you don't need. Dia allows you to change the order of the object (you want to place the image in the background). Dia ...


5

First place a UML Message object with it's base attached to your lifeline. Then, double-click the arrow (or right-click, Properties), and change the Message Type drop-down field to Recursive, and you'll get something like this: Now you can drag the green anchor point around to make the Message arrow look as you'd like. (A note of caution: it seems that ...


5

There is a way to import them but they loose quality as advanced transparency seems to be unsupported: 1) Drag & drop the SVG file into an empty drawing area. 2) Export it as .shape: File -> Export... Then select "By extension" and save the file as ".shape". Then a dialog will appear. Choose the default size in there. 3) Import it: F9 -> NEW -> SVG ...


4

The "professional" ER tools (Erwin, Power Designer etc.) will let you generate DDL from your models and/or reverse engineer a diagram from an existing DB or DDL. Dia doesn't do that - it just lets you draw pictures. However, as long as that's all you want then I wouldn't have any reservations using it. I use both Dia and visio extensively for these kinds ...


4

the cardinality of relationships is set inside the relationship box. double click it to find its properties. first three properties are name, left cardinality and right cardinality :) this way they remain locked to the relationship box and not the line. which actually makes more sense. also, make sure you're using the model sheet "er", and not "uml", since ...


4

This depends a little on the export formats. For some (e.g. PNG antialiased) you can specify a resolution in pixels. For other formats, go to File->Page Setup... and increase the scale factor.


3

You can simply stack two Lifeline elements on top of each other. The top of the second lifeline can be connected to the end of the execution (the grey area) in the first lifeline.


3

With modern browsers, you can embed SVG in HTML. This will give you shapes as indidual objects. With the upcoming Dia 0.98 your SVG could even include hyperlinks: http://www.dia-installer.de/images/linktest.svg Note that "shapes being individual pictures" would most likely involve overlapping pictures - is that what you're looking for?


3

You must change the environment variable LANG and set up to "en_EN". You can do it opening a terminal (executing the command "cmd") and typing: C:\>SET LANG=en_EN And then launching Dia, for example: C:\>"C:\Program Files\Dia\bin\diaw.exe" It works for me in Windows XP. But you should have made the installation of Dia with all the locales.


2

if you google "dia python", you'll find http://projects.gnome.org/dia/python.html which is a good starting point


2

Dia itself doesn't do SQL/DDL, but there's a whole bunch of tools that converts Dia diagrams into SQL/DDL for various databases (and programming languages). Just have a look at http://live.gnome.org/Dia/Links


2

Here's what you could do: Make sure that your association is one straight line. On top/below your association, add a standard line object. You'll be able to connect to the middle of the standard line object using a connection line of your choice.


2

Check menu "File" -> "Layout" Then check the scale is set to 1 (do not set the sheets)


2

or you can make environment variable in advanced system settings in control panel -> Variable name: LANG Variable value: en_EN This you can make to not always typing thats commands in cmd.


2

On export, specify the PNG (anti-aliased) (*.png) exporter. When you click Save, it will ask you for the resolution. Change either the X or Y, and it will scale up the other so your image is not distored. Do not use the Cairo or Pixbuf exporters, as they do not ask you. To specify the PNG exporter, select File->Export, and at the bottom of the Export ...


1

Good news: The UML association has been improved and will allow for such connections: http://git.gnome.org/browse/dia/commit/?id=302d5038e755cabb5ce9292d66d0ab9113153e15 This new feature will be included in the upcoming version 0.98. Until it is released, you can use the Dia Development VM to testdrive the new functionalities: ...


1

Download the source, edit the file objects/UML/umlattributes.c, in function UMLAttribute * uml_attribute_new(void) (around line 73), change the line attr->visibility = UML_PUBLIC; to attr->visibility = UML_PRIVATE; Optionally, play around with other files and modify to your liking. Compile the modified source: How to compile Dia


1

I have used dia for database mapping and when I was doing that I found having template objects that I copied instead of just creating a new object was the easiest way to get all the defaults the way I wanted on new objects.


1

Here's another alternative, albeit merely a variation of Steffen's approach. First draw your two associated classes, and the Association object connecting them. Then draw a simple Line object that attaches to the same exact connection points as the association object. Of course now you've got this ugly extra line in there, so to fix that double-click the ...


1

DIA has consistent COM based interface. DbgHelp consist of a set of standard C functions. Here two aricles I have written about DIA (with C++ Samples), that shows the power of DIA: Symbols File Locator How to Inspect the Content of a Program Database (PDB) File When possible, use DIA and not DbgHelp, since DIA can be used by any COM-aware program.


1

It is the same thing. DbgHelp is the core api, it is usable from C. DIA is a COM object model on top of it that just makes it easier to use and makes it accessible from most any language. It is an acronym for Debug Interface Access, emphasis on "Access". The MSDN documentation for it starts here.


1

actually, what you're looking for is the function to align objects to each other. snap to grid will only work for your purpose in certain situations, like when the connected objects are of equal hight/width, or when the line is connected to the snapped edge. it's better to align the objects vertically or horizontally. if the line is connected in the middle ...


1

Did you try to export your Dia diagram in EMF or WMF format? This usually works quite well. You'll have to insert the EMF as an image in Word. If that still doesn't help you may have found a bug in Dia and should report it in Dia's Bugzilla in order to get it fixed (Most probably a sample diagram will be required to illustrate your problem) ...


1

I am happy with tedia2sql, an excellent perl dia parser. http://metacpan.org/pod/Parse::Dia::SQL


1

If you want to use Dia: It might not be necessary to "code" your components. Maybe you can simply "draw" them: http://dia-installer.de/howto/create_shape/index.html.en Such shapes can also be equipped with attributes (you'll have to do some XML-Editing for this): http://git.gnome.org/browse/dia/tree/doc/custom-shapes#n260 I'm not sure if you were aware ...


1

According to Pylon's documentation, that's The Pyramid traversal algorithm. We’ll provide a description of the algorithm, a diagram of how the algorithm works, and some example traversal scenarios that might help you understand how the algorithm operates against a specific resource tree In the above link there's a clear description of the algorithm, ...


1

To anyone that needs to go down this route in the future, the best option was definitely pydot. Easy to use, and pretty full-featured. Way to go, Graphviz.



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