Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Almost perfect solution, that automatically scales to dimensions of an element would be usage of CSS3 linear-gradient connected with calc() as shown below. Main drawback is of course compatibility. Code below works in Firefox 25 and Explorer 10 and 11, but in Chrome (I've tested v30 and v32 dev) there are some subtle problems with lines disappearing if they ...


17

There are probably better ways to do it in numpy than below, but I'm not too familiar with it yet: import numpy as np matrix = np.array( [[-2, 5, 3, 2], [ 9, -6, 5, 1], [ 3, 2, 7, 3], [-1, 8, -4, 8]]) diags = [matrix[::-1,:].diagonal(i) for i in range(-3,4)] diags.extend(matrix.diagonal(i) for i in ...


10

You can use fliplr(eye(7)) This results in ans = 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0


9

You are looking for the triu function img = triu( ones( 256 ), 1 );


8

Use trigonometry to compute the desired angle: var angle = Math.atan2($(window).width(),$(window).height()); // in radians $('#blocktop,#blockbottom').css('transform','skew(-'+angle+'rad)'); (Note for math geeks and other pedants: the arctangent would normally take the height divided by the width, not the other way around. In this case, however, we're ...


8

The limits of the current plot area are in par()$usr. lines( par()$usr[1:2], par()$usr[3:4] )


7

Using diag. For the superdiagonal, you just discard the last row and first column. For the subdiagonal, discard first row, last column: m <- matrix(1:9,nrow=3) > m [,1] [,2] [,3] [1,] 1 4 7 [2,] 2 5 8 [3,] 3 6 9 > diag(m) [1] 1 5 9 > diag(m[-nrow(m),-1]) [1] 4 8 > diag(m[-1,-ncol(m)]) [1] 2 6


7

First your function initializes the matrix, A, but does nothing with it after. You need to modify the entry of A for your function to return anything more than the zero matrix. You could use MATLAB's function diag which creates a diagonal matrix from a vector. for example d=1:n; %# create vector 1,2,...,n A = diag(d) %# create diagonal matrix with entries ...


7

Not quite sure what your goal is here, but here's the reason why your code blows up. Prelude> let paar = [(a,b) | a<-[a | a<-[1..], mod a 3 == 0], b<-[b*b | b<-[1..]]] Prelude> take 10 paar [(3,1),(3,4),(3,9),(3,16),(3,25),(3,36),(3,49),(3,64),(3,81),(3,100)] Notice you're generating all the (3, ?) pairs before any other. The elem ...


7

Here is my matrix, produced by A = magic(5) A = 17 24 1 8 15 23 5 7 14 16 4 6 13 20 22 10 12 19 21 3 11 18 25 2 9 s = size(A,1) A(s:s-1:end-1) ans = 11 12 13 14 15


7

Because @mathematician1975 is too lazy to write a proper answer. Matlab has a function for this, called toeplitz You would call it like this: c=[1;2;3;4;0;0;0]; r=[0, 0, 0, 0]; toeplitz(c,r) ans = 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 2 1 0 4 3 2 1 0 4 3 2 0 0 4 3 0 0 0 4 You can play with the zeroes to shape ...


7

If you care about performance, you can try a bsxfun based method - n = 256; %// resolution of img would be nxn img = bsxfun(@le,[1:n]',0:n-1); Benchmarks comparing BSXFUN and TRIU - num_runs = 50000; %// Number of iterations to run benchmarks n = 256; %// nxn would be the resolution of image %// Warm up tic/toc. for k = 1:50000 tic(); elapsed = ...


6

Use eye function to get an identity matrix and add to original matrix result = A+eye(3,3) ; % A the original matrix


6

You can do it something like this: <style> .background { background-color: #BCBCBC; width: 100px; height: 50px; padding: 0; margin: 0 } .line1 { width: 112px; height: 47px; border-bottom: 1px solid red; -webkit-transform: translateY(-20px) ...


6

You can use np.indices to get the indices of your array and then assign the values where you want. a = np.zeros((5,10)) i,j = np.indices(a.shape) i,j are the line and column indices, respectively. a[i==j] = 1. a[i==j-1] = 2. a[i==j-2] = 3. will result in: array([[ 1., 2., 3., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0.], [ 0., 1., 2., 3., 0., 0., ...


6

Start with the diagonals that slope up-and-right. If (x,y) is a rectangular coordinate inside the matrix, you want to transform to/from a coordinate scheme (p,q), where p is the number of the diagonal and q is the index along the diagonal. (So p=0 is the [-2] diagonal, p=1 is the [9,5] diagonal, p=2 is the [3,-6,3] diagonal, and so on.) To transform a ...


6

size <- 6 mat <- matrix(seq_len(size ^ 2), ncol = size) low <- 0 high <- 3 delta <- rep(seq_len(ncol(mat)), nrow(mat)) - rep(seq_len(nrow(mat)), each = ncol(mat)) #or Ben Bolker's better alternative delta <- row(mat) - col(mat) mat[delta < low | delta > high] <- NA mat this works with 5000 x 5000 matrices on my machine


5

The command tril has an extra argument that controls which lower triangular exactly to use. A = eye(3) + 2*tril(ones(3), -1);


5

I just use the fact that a DOM-Element with two different border for top and right results in a diagonal line where both meet. Then put the height and width of the DOM-Element to zero and set the border-top-width to window-height and the border-right-width to window-width. Update it with JavaScript on resize... That's all. I've put a container in the DOM ...


5

Anything is possible if you fiddle around with it long enough, here's an example using some creative borders and a lot of CSS: .arrow_box:after, .arrow_box:before { top: 100%; border: solid transparent; content: " "; height: 0; width: 0; position: absolute; pointer-events: none; } FIDDLE And another one using CSS3 rotate: ...


5

The command toeplitz does exactly what you want: toeplitz([1,2,3,4,5,6]) ans = 1 2 3 4 5 6 2 1 2 3 4 5 3 2 1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1 2 3 5 4 3 2 1 2 6 5 4 3 2 1


5

If you just want to add the identity matrix or a multiple of it to your square matrix, you can do A_new = A_old + k*eye(size(A_old)); where A_old is your matrix and k is some multiplier. If you want to add a different values to each diagonal element, you can do something like A_new = A_old + diag(values); where values is a vector with as many number ...


5

N = 10 diag = np.zeros(N) + 2 udiag = np.zeros(N) + 1 ldiag = np.zeros(N) + 1 mat = scipy.sparse.dia_matrix(([diag, udiag, ldiag], [0, 2, -2]), shape=(N, N)) print mat.todense() [[ 2. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0.] [ 0. 2. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0.] [ 1. 0. 2. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0.] [ 0. 1. 0. 2. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 0.] [ 0. 0. 1. ...


5

I found a similar question on www.c-sharpcorner.com. It provides below code using System; using System.Management; class Test { static void Main() { var searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher("\\root\\wmi","SELECT * FROM WmiMonitorBasicDisplayParams"); foreach(ManagementObject mo in searcher.Get()) { double width = ...


5

Try 3D transforms - something like this: demo Relevant CSS: body /* parent of .block in general */ { -webkit-perspective: 15em; perspective: 15em; } .block { -webkit-transform: rotateX(-5deg) rotateY(10deg); transform: rotateX(-5deg) rotateY(10deg); }


5

You can do this quite easily with linear indexing, you don't even need reshape! [r, c] = size(m); m(1:c:end) = 1; m = 1 2 3 4 1 6 7 8 1 1 11 12 13 1 15 If r < c, this is the best I got: if r < c n = m'; n(1:r:end) = 1; m = n'; else m(1:c:end) = 1; end


4

Please check the following. <canvas id="myCanvas" width="200" height="100"></canvas> <div id="mydiv"></div> JS: var c = document.getElementById("myCanvas"); var ctx = c.getContext("2d"); ctx.strokeStyle="red"; ctx.moveTo(0,100); ctx.lineTo(200,0); ctx.stroke(); ctx.moveTo(0,0); ctx.lineTo(200,100); ctx.stroke(); CSS: html, body ...


4

The R programming language? I like C better, it is easier to spell. One way is to create a matrix with the numbers the way I like them to look: a<-t(matrix(1:16,nrow=4,ncol=4)) which looks like: [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [1,] 1 2 3 4 [2,] 5 6 7 8 [3,] 9 10 11 12 [4,] 13 14 15 16 Delete the values on the ...


4

You only do something if i == j. That should tell you that you only need one of those variables. In fact, you only need one of the loops, because you're only doing nDims operations. for (int i=0;i<nDims;i++){ IM[i][i] = 1; }


4

A clumsy, but generic one-liner n = 3; %number of elements in A; m = 5; %repetitions A = (1:n); B = full( spdiags( repmat(A(:),1,m)' , 1-(1:n) , n+m-1, m) ) returns: B = 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible