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31

Almost perfect solution, that automatically scales to dimensions of an element would be usage of CSS3 linear-gradient connected with calc() as shown below. Main drawback is of course compatibility. Code below works in Firefox 25 and Explorer 10 and 11, but in Chrome (I've tested v30 and v32 dev) there are some subtle problems with lines disappearing if they ...


29

There are probably better ways to do it in numpy than below, but I'm not too familiar with it yet: import numpy as np matrix = np.array( [[-2, 5, 3, 2], [ 9, -6, 5, 1], [ 3, 2, 7, 3], [-1, 8, -4, 8]]) diags = [matrix[::-1,:].diagonal(i) for i in range(-3,4)] diags.extend(matrix.diagonal(i) for i in ...


16

You can use row() and col() to identify row/column relationships. m <- read.table(text=" 1 2 3 4 100 8 12 5 14 99 1 6 4 3 98 2 5 4 11 97 5 3 7 2") vals <- sapply(2:8, function(j) sum(m[row(m)+col(m)==j])) or (as suggested in comments by ?@thelatemail) vals <- sapply(split(as.matrix(m), ...


14

You can do it something like this: <style> .background { background-color: #BCBCBC; width: 100px; height: 50px; padding: 0; margin: 0 } .line1 { width: 112px; height: 47px; border-bottom: 1px solid red; -webkit-transform: translateY(-20px) ...


10

size <- 6 mat <- matrix(seq_len(size ^ 2), ncol = size) low <- 0 high <- 3 delta <- rep(seq_len(ncol(mat)), nrow(mat)) - rep(seq_len(nrow(mat)), each = ncol(mat)) #or Ben Bolker's better alternative delta <- row(mat) - col(mat) mat[delta < low | delta > high] <- NA mat this works with 5000 x 5000 matrices on my machine


10

Use trigonometry to compute the desired angle: var angle = Math.atan2($(window).width(),$(window).height()); // in radians $('#blocktop,#blockbottom').css('transform','skew(-'+angle+'rad)'); (Note for math geeks and other pedants: the arctangent would normally take the height divided by the width, not the other way around. In this case, however, we're ...


10

You can use fliplr(eye(7)) This results in ans = 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0


10

You are looking for the triu function img = triu( ones( 256 ), 1 );


10

Summary As of R version 3.2.1 (World-Famous Astronaut) diag() has received an update. The discussion moved to r-devel where it was noted that c() strips non-name attributes and may have been why it was placed there. While some people worried that removing c() would cause unknown issues on matrix-like objects, Peter Dalgaard found that, "The only case where ...


9

Using diag. For the superdiagonal, you just discard the last row and first column. For the subdiagonal, discard first row, last column: m <- matrix(1:9,nrow=3) > m [,1] [,2] [,3] [1,] 1 4 7 [2,] 2 5 8 [3,] 3 6 9 > diag(m) [1] 1 5 9 > diag(m[-nrow(m),-1]) [1] 4 8 > diag(m[-1,-ncol(m)]) [1] 2 6


8

The limits of the current plot area are in par()$usr. lines( par()$usr[1:2], par()$usr[3:4] )


8

Start with the diagonals that slope up-and-right. If (x,y) is a rectangular coordinate inside the matrix, you want to transform to/from a coordinate scheme (p,q), where p is the number of the diagonal and q is the index along the diagonal. (So p=0 is the [-2] diagonal, p=1 is the [9,5] diagonal, p=2 is the [3,-6,3] diagonal, and so on.) To transform a ...


8

Here is my matrix, produced by A = magic(5) A = 17 24 1 8 15 23 5 7 14 16 4 6 13 20 22 10 12 19 21 3 11 18 25 2 9 s = size(A,1) A(s:s-1:end-1) ans = 11 12 13 14 15


8

If you care about performance, you can try a bsxfun based method - n = 256; %// resolution of img would be nxn img = bsxfun(@le,[1:n]',0:n-1); Benchmarks comparing BSXFUN and TRIU - num_runs = 50000; %// Number of iterations to run benchmarks n = 256; %// nxn would be the resolution of image %// Warm up tic/toc. for k = 1:50000 tic(); elapsed = ...


7

First your function initializes the matrix, A, but does nothing with it after. You need to modify the entry of A for your function to return anything more than the zero matrix. You could use MATLAB's function diag which creates a diagonal matrix from a vector. for example d=1:n; %# create vector 1,2,...,n A = diag(d) %# create diagonal matrix with entries ...


7

Anything is possible if you fiddle around with it long enough, here's an example using some creative borders and a lot of CSS: .arrow_box:after, .arrow_box:before { top: 100%; border: solid transparent; content: " "; height: 0; width: 0; position: absolute; pointer-events: none; } FIDDLE And another one using CSS3 rotate: ...


7

First I thought this could be done with CSS triangles, but I can't quite work out how to make a downward right pointing triangle be 100% width, so I moved on to another option... You could keep using the rotation technique as you are doing, but then add some padding to the bottom of the green part, and then use a negative margin-bottom to bring the footer ...


7

Because @mathematician1975 is too lazy to write a proper answer. Matlab has a function for this, called toeplitz You would call it like this: c=[1;2;3;4;0;0;0]; r=[0, 0, 0, 0]; toeplitz(c,r) ans = 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 2 1 0 4 3 2 1 0 4 3 2 0 0 4 3 0 0 0 4 You can play with the zeroes to shape ...


7

Not quite sure what your goal is here, but here's the reason why your code blows up. Prelude> let paar = [(a,b) | a<-[a | a<-[1..], mod a 3 == 0], b<-[b*b | b<-[1..]]] Prelude> take 10 paar [(3,1),(3,4),(3,9),(3,16),(3,25),(3,36),(3,49),(3,64),(3,81),(3,100)] Notice you're generating all the (3, ?) pairs before any other. The elem ...


7

It can be something like this Example 1 div { min-height: 100px; background: #D25A1E; position: relative; width: calc(50% - 30px); } .div1 { float: left; } .div2 { float: right; } .div1:after, .div2:before { content:''; position: absolute; top: 0; width: 0; height: 0; } .div1:after { ...


7

If two lines are fine... x = x.'; %'// transpose because you want to work along 2nd dimension first result = x(~eye(size(x))).'; %'// index with logical mask to remove diagonal


6

Try 3D transforms - something like this: demo Relevant CSS: body /* parent of .block in general */ { -webkit-perspective: 15em; perspective: 15em; } .block { -webkit-transform: rotateX(-5deg) rotateY(10deg); transform: rotateX(-5deg) rotateY(10deg); }


6

The R programming language? I like C better, it is easier to spell. One way is to create a matrix with the numbers the way I like them to look: a<-t(matrix(1:16,nrow=4,ncol=4)) which looks like: [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [1,] 1 2 3 4 [2,] 5 6 7 8 [3,] 9 10 11 12 [4,] 13 14 15 16 Delete the values on the ...


6

Use eye function to get an identity matrix and add to original matrix result = A+eye(3,3) ; % A the original matrix


6

Try m1 <- t(matrix(vec1, nrow=5, ncol=3))[,1:3] m1[lower.tri(m1)] <- 0 m1 # [,1] [,2] [,3] #[1,] 14000 12000 8000 #[2,] 0 14000 12000 #[3,] 0 0 14000 or use toeplitz toeplitz(vec1)*upper.tri(diag(seq_along(vec1)), diag=TRUE) # [,1] [,2] [,3] #[1,] 14000 12000 8000 #[2,] 0 14000 12000 #[3,] 0 0 14000 Or a ...


6

N = 10 diag = np.zeros(N) + 2 udiag = np.zeros(N) + 1 ldiag = np.zeros(N) + 1 mat = scipy.sparse.dia_matrix(([diag, udiag, ldiag], [0, 2, -2]), shape=(N, N)) print mat.todense() [[ 2. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0.] [ 0. 2. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0.] [ 1. 0. 2. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 0. 0.] [ 0. 1. 0. 2. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 0.] [ 0. 0. 1. ...


6

Another aggregate variation, avoiding the formula interface, which actually complicates matters in this instance: aggregate(list(Sum=unlist(dat)), list(Group=LETTERS[c(row(dat) + col(dat))-1]), FUN=sum) # Group Sum #1 A 8 #2 B 13 #3 C 13 #4 D 28 #5 E 10 #6 F 18 #7 G 2


6

Yes. I think (as always in R) there are various ways to do it, but here is one. It uses the diag function from base-R and removes the first row and last column before getting the diagonal and calculating it's mean. res <- mean(diag(mm[-1,-ncol(mm)])) Data used: mm <- structure(c(0L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 3L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 4L, 1L, 1L, 1L, ...


6

To look for a vectorized solution consider using spdiags(). n = 5; A = repmat([1:n-1,n:-1:1],n,1); B = full(spdiags(A,-n+1:n-1,n,n)); This will return: 5 4 3 2 1 4 5 4 3 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 3 4 5 4 1 2 3 4 5 As @Adriaan pointed out B = B/n will transform the matrix values between 0 and 1.


6

I'm surprised no one has recommended the toeplitz matrix to you: n = 5; out = toeplitz(n:-1:1); We get: out = 5 4 3 2 1 4 5 4 3 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 3 4 5 4 1 2 3 4 5 If you want to normalize this to [0,1], simply do standard normalization such that: ...



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