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19

This is because, as you say, operator[] returns a std::string&, which defines an operator= (char c). Your commented-out example does not call the assignment operator, it is copy-initialization, which will try to call explicit constructors of the class, of which there are no applicable ones in std::string.


7

First, the format of your dictionaries is not correct (: and not =): dict1 = {'hi':45, 'thanks':34, 'please':60} dict2 = {'hi':40, 'thanks':46, 'please':50} You can use a dictionary comprehension. You basically loop through one dictionary, check that the key is also in the second dictionary and insert the difference of the values in the output dictionary. ...


7

One way of counting the values like you want, is shown below: from collections import Counter d = {1:'Bob',2:'Joe',3:'Bob', 4:'Bill', 5:'Bill'} c = Counter() new_d = {} for k in sorted(d.keys()): name = d[k] c[name] += 1; new_d[k] = [name, c[name]] print(new_d) # {1: ['Bob', 1], 2: ['Joe', 1], 3: ['Bob', 2], 4: ['Bill', 1], 5: ['Bill', ...


7

Use the collections.Counter() class instead: from collections import Counter word_dict = Counter(word) The Counter does the exact same thing; count occurrences of each letter in word. In your specific case you didn't first check if the key already exists or provide a default if it doesn't. You could use dict.get() to do that: word = 'stacks' word_dict ...


7

You can use itertools.product for this, i.e calculate cartesian product of the value and then simply zip each of the them with the keys from the dictionary. Note that ordering of a dict's keys() and corresponding values() remains same if it is not modified in-between hence ordering won't be an issue here: >>> from itertools import product ...


6

To impose an order (which a dict per se doesn't have), let's say you're going in sorted order on the keys. Then you could do -- assuming the values are hashable, as in you example...: import collections def enriched_by_count(somedict): countsofar = collections.defaultdict(int) result = {} for k in sorted(somedict): v = somedict[k] ...


6

You should take a look at the PYTHONHASHSEED environment variable: https://docs.python.org/3/using/cmdline.html#envvar-PYTHONHASHSEED Set it to a fixed integer and then your hash seed is deterministic.


6

I think you are looking for something like this: condition = all(k in dict1 and dict2[k] <= dict1[k] for k in dict2) You asked in the comments how to read this. That's difficult to answer because not everyone would look at it the same way. Perhaps if I tell you how I got to that expression it may help. I read your question as saying "every key in ...


6

Try this: [{'name': x[0], 'data': x[1:]} for x in my_list] If you're using Python 2.7 or 3.x, you can use comprehensions to create a dict as well as a list. The [1:] slice gives you a list with the first element onwards. Your issue is that you're duplicating your effort to create a list, by writing a comprehension where you don't need one ([x[1:] for x ...


6

Use a defaultdict. from collections import defaultdict d = defaultdict(list) # Every time you try to access the value of a key that isn't in the dict yet, # d will call list with no arguments (producing an empty list), # store the result as the new value, and give you that. for line in myDatasetFile: d[int(line[-1])].append([line[2],float(line[3])]) ...


5

Because String overrides Object.hashCode() while your class doesn't. What this means is that the String class has a specific implementation of hashCode() that will calculate a hash based on the String value. So for two strings with the same value, the hash code will be the same. When you create a new class, A, for example, if you do not provide your own ...


5

You can use a list comprehension : >>> dic={'Tim':3, 'Kate':2} >>> [{'Name':i, 'Age':j} for i,j in dic.items()] [{'Age': 3, 'Name': 'Tim'}, {'Age': 2, 'Name': 'Kate'}] and for opposite : >>> l=[{'Name':i, 'Age':j} for i,j in dic.items()] >>> dict((i.values()[::-1] for i in l)) {'Tim': 3, 'Kate': 2}


5

Looks like a basic dict and list comprehension raw = [[(1, None), (2, None)], [(0, None), (2, None)], [(1, None), (0, None)]] print {i: [el[0] for el in l] for i, l in enumerate(raw)} prints {0: [1, 2], 1: [0, 2], 2: [1, 0]}


5

If you know that the first item will always be the key, then this list comprehension would get the job done: new_dict = [{"name":k[0], "data":k[1:]} for k in items] The reason that you're getting the "too many values to unpack" is because you have more values than you had variables. Python doesn't know to assign the remaining variables to g. If the items ...


4

You have to initialize the second level dictionary values as lists: from collections import defaultdict, OrderedDict class NestedOrderedDict(OrderedDict): def __missing__(self,k): val = self[k] = NestedOrderedDict() return self[k] orddodol = NestedOrderedDict() orddodol["foo"]["a"] = [] # these orddodol["foo"]["b"] = [] ...


4

You almost did it right :) If you want to create ordered dictionary of dictionary of list, then you'd better use defaultdict(list) for that purpose: from collections import defaultdict, OrderedDict class NestedOrderedDict(OrderedDict): def __missing__(self, k): >>>> self[k] = defaultdict(list) return self[k] orddodol = ...


4

Without using any modules, this is the code I came up with. Maybe not as short, but I am scared of modules. def new_dict(d): check = [] #List for checking against new_dict = {} #The new dictionary to be returned for i in sorted(d.keys()): #Loop through all the dictionary items val = d[i] #Store the dictionary item value in a variable ...


4

Dictionary to list of dictionary >>> dic={'Tim':3, 'Kate':2} >>> [{"Name":i, "Age":j} for i,j in dic.items()] [{'Age': 3, 'Name': 'Tim'}, {'Age': 2, 'Name': 'Kate'}] >>> Best to use Dictionary Data Structure because Time Complexity to Find Key is O(1) Constant Time i.e. it is not depend on the size of dictionary Demo to ...


4

No. Standard containers do not need to be cleared before destruction as resources are automatically released. Note however that if your std::map or std::vector contains raw pointers to dynamically allocated memory then this memory must be taken care of. In other words the destruction of a raw pointer doesn't deallocate the memory pointed to, therefore code ...


4

You can just loop on all the values within the dict, and check if any of them is a dict: >>> d = { ... "key1" : { ... "key2" : "value2", ... "key3" : "value3", ... "key4" : "value4" ... }, ... "key5" : { ... "key6": "value6", ... "key7" : "value7" ... } ... } >>> any(isinstance(value, dict) ...


4

You could nest the power() function in the main() function: def main(): def power(x): return x(r) funcs = [square, cube] for r in range(5): value = map(power, funcs) print value so that r is now taken from the surrounding scope again, but is not a global. Instead it is a closure variable instead. However, using a ...


4

You can use get method. my_item.get('url',None) # None is default in case url key does not exist. EDIT: I undelete my answer as, after OP's edit, its clear that the issue is about getting value from a dict, not about assignment.


4

A multi-dimensional dictionary is simply a dictionary where the values are themselves also dictionaries, creating a nested structure: new_dic = {} new_dic[1] = {} new_dic[1][2] = 5 You'd have to detect that you already created new_dic[1] each time, though, to not accidentally wipe that nested object for additional keys under new_dic[1]. You can simplify ...


4

This is exactly what csv.DictReader was made for. import csv with open('data.csv') as f: reader = csv.DictReader(f) for row in reader: print row For the data.csv containing: Header1,Header2,Header3 A,1,10 B,2,20 C,3,30 It prints: {'Header2': '1', 'Header3': '10', 'Header1': 'A'} {'Header2': '2', 'Header3': '20', 'Header1': 'B'} ...


3

Well, you don't have to convert it in a dictionary, you can directly: print('Name Age') for name, age in dic.items(): print('{} {}'.format(name, age))


3

You were on the right path with thinking about using the dictionarys' keys. Here, I go through the first dictionary's keys, checking if they're in dictionary2. Then I do the same with dictionary2, checking for keys in dictionary1, but also ensuring that the key isn't already in the result dictionary so we don't do duplicate subtraction. dict1 = {'hi': 45, ...


3

Another way using map >>> dic={'Tim':3, 'Kate':2} >>> map(lambda x: x,dic) ['Tim', 'Kate'] >>> map(lambda x:{'Age':dic[x],'Name':x},dic) [{'Age': 3, 'Name': 'Tim'}, {'Age': 2, 'Name': 'Kate'}] >>> Note - map is slower compared to a list comprehension, but I have just added it as an alternative


3

Why not just do this? private void Foo() { Int64[] keys = _data.Keys.ToArray<Int64>(); Int32[] vals = _data.Keys.Select(k => _data[k]).ToArray<Int32>(); // Further code goes here } It's still O(n) time and it won't break if .NET changes in the future.


3

These lines: for trait in self.name: print trait self.name is a string. If you loop over a string, you get the individual characters one by one. Your print statement thus prints each character, one-by-one. If you want to print the name of the model, just: print self.name You don't need a loop here at all.


3

Does STL 'map' declared locally inside a function need to be cleared when the function exits? No, the destructors of standard library containers* take care of clearing up their own resources. Otherwise they would be quite unusable. * The same applies to the STL, but I believe you are referring to the C++ standard library



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