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7

It's no more efficient but perhaps a little easier to read for (auto i = std::next(table.begin(), 2); i != table.end(); i++)


6

Use the Map.prototype.entries function, like this var myMap = new Map(); myMap.set("0", "foo"); myMap.set(1, "bar"); myMap.set({}, "baz"); console.log(myMap.entries().next().value); // ["0", "foo"] If you want to get the first key, then use Map.prototype.keys, like this console.log(myMap.keys().next().value); // "0" Similarly if you want to get ...


5

As already mentioned by Hot Licks you can use NSDictionary method isEqualToDictionary() to check if they are equal as follow: let dic1: [String: AnyObject] = ["key1": 100, "key2": 200] let dic2: [String: AnyObject] = ["key1": 100, "key2": 200] let dic3: [String: AnyObject] = ["key1": 100, "key2": 250] println( NSDictionary(dictionary: ...


5

Using nested generator expression ((x.split() for x in l)) to yield key, value pairs: >>> l = ['aaa 0', 'bbb 1', 'ccc 2', 'ddd 3', 'abc 1'] >>> wanted = {'aaa', 'abc'} >>> {key: value for key, value in (x.split() for x in l) if key in wanted} {'abc': '1', 'aaa': '0'}


5

You can do it like this: var res = data .Keys .Where(s => !s.EndsWith("_comment")) .Select(s => new[] {s, data[s], data[s+"_comment"]}) .ToList(); The ides is to first filter out all keys that do not end in "_comment", and then use these keys to look up the two pieces of content into the resultant array. Demo.


3

In Swift 2, when both Key and Value are Equatable, you can use == on the dictionary itself: public func ==<Key : Equatable, Value : Equatable>(lhs: [Key : Value], rhs: [Key : Value]) -> Bool And, NSObject is Equatable: public func ==(lhs: NSObject, rhs: NSObject) -> Bool In your case, if you are working with Obj-C objects that you want to ...


3

Personally, I would do it using pattern matching. It makes it very readable. serviceMap.get(service) match { case Some(s) => println("Here's my string from the map! " + s) case _ => //issue 404 } Also, code can be easily modified then. For instance, if at some point in the future you'll need to do stuff if specifically for the value that map to ...


3

I would think the idiomatic way is to use map and getOrElse: val result = serviceMap.get(service).map { url => // do something with url } getOrElse { // not found } In general, don't think about Option as a one-element collection to loop over (which isn't the functional approach) but to transform into something else.


2

A couple of options that are clearer: match with unapply (which avoids the type-erasure problems of _ : Option[CantTellWhatThisIsAtRuntime]): serviceMap.get(service) match { case Some(path) => // Do stuff and return case _ => // 404 } Use a fold to extract the value (this assumes that you can type your 404 appropriately): ...


2

Here is a simple example using a class and a collection (basically modified from the examples here: Class is pretty simple (class name is Employee): Option Explicit Private pName As String Private pAddress As String Private pSalary As Double Public Property Get Name() As String Name = pName End Property Public Property Let Name(Value As String) ...


2

You can do this in a set comprehension; the loop includes all names in the colleagues list plus their recursive colleague names: def names(teacher): return {name for c in teacher['colleagues'] for name in {c['name']} | names(c)} You could also express it as the union of the set of direct names and the recursive calls: def names(teacher): direct = ...


2

First of all, the deprecated Date constructor you used doesn't recognize a month with numeric value 12. December is represented as 11, so date Date(2013, 12, 31) will cause a recalculation. Secondly, you can now use Java 8's LocalDate to make your scenario easier. Example: import java.time.LocalDate; import java.time.ZoneId; import java.util.Date; import ...


2

Fist of all... this wont compile: Map<Person, ArrayList<Location>> personByLocation = new HashMap<String, ArrayList<Location>>(); Should declare map as: Map<Person, ArrayList<Location>> personByLocation = new HashMap<Person, ArrayList<Location>>(); NOTE: I think the point is, Person.location is the actual ...


1

Assuming it's a typo and 'Tom' and 'tom_score' supposed to be the same, you can use defaultdict. from collections import defaultdict nfl = defaultdict(dict) for k in data: if k in ['Tom', 'bob', 'kara', 'Mike']: nfl[k].update(data[k]) You can skip if part with names check if you want to have all names from the data and not only specified ...


1

I don't know if is more efficient but the following statement uses split once: {k: n for k, n in dict([x.split() for x in l]).iteritems() if k in wanted}


1

edit - thank you for updating the data to something that makes sense. Traversing a trie is pretty interesting. Here is a quick demonstration. trie = {"a": {"b": {"e": {}, "f": {}, "g": {"l": {}, "m": {}, "n": {}}}, "c": {"h": {}, ...


1

You could use the update method of dictionaries, e.g. d.update((extract_the_key(r), extract_the_value(r)) for r in responses)


1

Something like this might do the trick: int[] dateValues = { 2014, 1, 1, 2013, 12, 31, 2014, 1, 11, 2013, 12, 31, 2014, 1, 21, 2013, 12, 31, 2014, 1, 31, 2013, 12, 31 }; Map<Date, Date> map = new HashMap<>(); Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(); cal.clear(); for (int i = 0; i < ...


1

Assuming q is a character vector (or list) of the sentences and you're interested in exact matches of the keywords only, then you can use regular expressions: matches = lapply(q, function(x) dict[sapply(dict, grepl, x, ignore.case=T)]) You get a list of the length of q. Every list element contains a vector of the dictionary words found in the according ...


1

You can reduce the split() operation to one. l = ['aaa 0','bdb 1','ccc 2','ddd 3','abc 1'] dict = { } s = set(['aaa','abc']) for elem in l: nl = elem.split() if nl[0] in s: dict[nl[0]] = nl[1] for elm in dict: print elm,dict[elm]


1

To answer your question, just do: return {t.name : {'name': t.name, 'icon': t.icon, 'description': t.description, 'queryset': self.get_queryset().get_type(t) } for t in types} But this is not necessary at all, django has some useful database lookups that are really handy. You ...


1

A better way would be to simply put the values in after you've initialized the map: myMap = new HashMap<>(); myMap.put("a",0); myMap.put("b",0); What your current version is doing is that it's using an instance initializer block (a.k.a. double brace initialization), which creates an unnecessary anonymous class in the background. There is no real ...


1

What Rod_Algonquin meant was: public class A { private final Map<String,Integer> myMap; public A() { this.myMap = new HashMap<String,Integer>(); this.myMap.put("a",0); this.myMap.put("b",0); } } Following up on Luiggi Mendoza's comment, since the Map is declared final, you might have meant for the map to be ...


1

Another approach - dictionary of dictionaries: Option Explicit Public Sub nestedList() Dim ws As Worksheet, i As Long, j As Long, x As Variant, y As Variant, z As Variant Dim itms As Dictionary, subItms As Dictionary 'ref to "Microsoft Scripting Runtime" Set ws = Worksheets("Sheet1") Set itms = New Dictionary For i = 2 To ...


1

You can also do what you originally proposed by using the Array function to create a Variant array. If your data structure is getting this elaborate, it's usually better to have a data model class as in @sous2817's answer. But this technique is useful for adhoc, throwaway code. Dim r As Range For Each r In ['[testing macro.xlsx]test'!D7:G8].Rows ...


1

Your goal is perform different actions based on the value existing or not. While pattern matching is a less-idiomatic way to convert an Option to a value, I would say it is wholly appropriate as a branching mechanism to choose between multiple actions. For that reason I would recommend using the match alternative you proposed. If, however, you disagree that ...



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