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34

In your case, the same key is related to multiple values, so standard dictionary is not suitable, as is. You can declare it like Dictionary<Key, List<Values>>. But, also, you can use: Lookup class, which is Represents a collection of keys each mapped to one or more values. You need framework 3.5 and more, for this.


12

What you need is a relationship between a Project and one or more Technicians: public class Project { public ICollection<Technician> Technicians { get; set; } } var project = new Project(); project.Technicians = new List<Technician>() { new Technician(), new Technician() }; Your objects should mirror the relationships in real ...


10

There is an experimental NuGet package from MS that contains MultiValueDictionary. Basically, it's like Dictionary<Project, List<Technicians>>, except that you don't have to repeat all the logic to manage the Lists every time you access it.


9

The Dictionary class has a constructor that takes any IEqualityComparer. What you need to do is implement a simple case-insensitive IEqualityComparer<char> and pass it to the constructor, and it will be used when evaluating the key. This is a similar question for implementing IComparer<char> without case sensitivity. IEqualityComparer will be ...


8

The return map type must be fully defined. Playground: http://play.golang.org/p/26LFrBhpBC func test() map[string]string { anotherMap := map[string]string{"a": "b", "c": "d"} return anotherMap }


7

You can implement your own comparer: public class CharComparer : IEqualityComparer<char> { public bool Equals(char c1, char c2) { return char.ToLowerInvariant(c1) == char.ToLowerInvariant(c2); } public int GetHashCode(char c1) { return char.ToLowerInvariant(c1).GetHashCode(); } } And pass it to the ...


7

You can use dictionary comprehension, to create a dictionary with the filtered values, like this >>> {key: d1[key] for key in d1 if d1[key] > 0} {'c': 8, 'd': 7} You can also use dict.items() like this >>> {key: value for key, value in d1.items() if value > 0} {'c': 8, 'd': 7} Note: Using dict.iteritems() will be more memory ...


7

Notice, not Dictionary, but IDictionary. The underlying implementation can do whatever it wants to do, even shut down your computer. The Dictionary does not throw any exceptions (except key null exception) when using ContainsKey. It's possible that the specific implementation of IDictionary you're using, throws KeyNotFoundException, but that would still be ...


5

As pointed out by Veedrac in his answer, this problem has already been solved in Python 3.3+ in the form of the ChainMap class: function_that_uses_dict(ChainMap({1001 : "1001"}, big_dict)) If you don't have Python 3.3 you should use a backport, and if for some reason you don't want to, then below you can see how to implement it by yourself :) You can ...


5

You could try something like this: for k, v in d.iteritems(): d[k] = round(v) It will do an in-place rounding of all of the items in the dictionary. In this particular example it will work perfectly, however be careful - all normal caveats of using the round function apply.


4

The best data storage option for Android Apps is the SQLite-Database build in to Android. It is private to the App, so every app has it own database and the User can not access the database in the file structure. Please read the linked google tutorial on how to read from and write to theSQLite Database. There are two demo projects linked below the article ...


4

one nice experssion, even in 2.5 you have a simple solution dict((k, dict1[k]) for k in list1) dict has an initializer that takes an iterable of tuples. The inner expression produces one tuple at a time, looking over the keys in list1 and getting the values from dict1 The above will result in a KeyError if list1 contains a key not in dict1, if that's ...


4

I don't think there is anything wrong with your solution. After all by, you can access easily all the team members by project. But alternatively you can try List<KeyValuePair<Project, Technician>>. You maintain the key-value relationship, but without restriction of not repeated keys. Is it much simpler to what you have now? Depends on use cases. ...


4

The standard implementations don't handle this, but you could roll your own easily enough. The trick is to keep hold of a HashMap<K,V> map to hold your real mappings, and another HashMap<V,V> canonical to make sure your values don't end up containing two equal but non-identical references. Whenever you want to add something to your map with ...


4

To make a small improvement on OP's own solution next((d['port'] for d in DDD if d['name']=='mouse'), None) This generator solution has the advantage of short circuiting over the list comprehension. None is the default value if it doesn't find anything instead of raising an error, otherwise you can simply run next alone in a try/except and catch an error ...


4

You are storing a method reference: arts = d['artist'].lower Because you didn't call the method, you only get the method object itself. That'll never be equal to the string in pickartist. Add (): arts = d['artist'].lower() Demo: >>> d = {'album': 'Lonerism', 'song': 'Led Zeppelin (Bonus Track)', 'datetime': '2014-12-10 08:03:00', 'artist': ...


4

string searchFor = // bool allContain = dict.Values.All(s => s.Contains(searchFor));


4

When you say a = None you are making a refer to None, which was earlier pointing to the dictionary object. But when you do a['car'] = 9 a is still a reference to the dictionary object and so, you are actually adding a new key car to the dictionary object only. That is why it works. So, the correct way to clear the dictionary is to use dict.clear ...


4

Use zip() to pair up the lists: {'video': [{'title': title, 'id': id} for title, id in zip(titles, ids)]} The video value is formed by a list comprehension; for every title, id pair formed by zip() a dictionary is created: >>> titles = ['New', 'New'] >>> ids = ['123', '123'] >>> {'video': [{'title': title, 'id': id} for title, ...


4

the item might be null because the map.get did not return anything (the outer map does not exist) or because the inner map does not contain the requested object. Therefor, a second check is performed to detect the actual reason item became null.


4

A coordinate is considered invalid if it meets at least one of the following criteria: Its latitude is greater than 90 degrees or less than -90 degrees. Its longitude is greater than 180 degrees or less than -180 degrees. Core Location Functions Reference You can check if the coordinate is valid with BOOL CLLocationCoordinate2DIsValid ( ...


4

I would probably use a constructor to do this: func NewGraph() *Graph { var g Graph g.connections = make(map[Vertex][]Vertex) return &g } I've found this example in the standard image/jpeg package (not with a map though, but with a slice): type Alpha struct { Pix []uint8 Stride int Rect Rectangle } func NewAlpha(r Rectangle) ...


3

use a defaultdict appending the values to a list: from collections import defaultdict audio = defaultdict(list) if elementTree.find('./connections') is None: return else: for connection_element in elementTree.findall('.//connections/connection'): # Get the type for this connection. controlType = connection_element.find('type') ...


3

It's very common for code (especially code fully under your control) to assume you initialize the data structure correctly. A struct literal is usually used in this case g := &Graph{ connections: make(map[Vertex][]Vertex), }


3

You can use count function in a list comprehension : >>> my_d = {"a":[1,2,2,5,2],"b":[2,1,2,4,5],"c":[7,2,2,6,2], "d":[7,2,2,2,2]} >>> [i for i,j in my_d.items() if j.count(2)>2] ['a', 'c', 'd'] my_d.items() give you the list of the items of your dictionary .


3

A value can be any Python object. d['a'] = d1


3

Using a dictionary, you can make the key an array. card = {'1 of hearts': '1', '2 of hearts': '2', 'ace of hearts':["1", "11"]} You can then access the first variable by using: print(card['ace of hearts'][0]) You can then access the second variable by using: print(card['ace of hearts'][1])


3

You could use any and a generator expression: if any(x['id'] == 3 for x in example_list): Of course, this assumes that all dictionaries have an id key. If not, then you could do: if any(x.get('id', 0) == 3 for x in example_list): Update: To get the dictionary returned, use next: dct = next((x for x in example_list if x['id'] == 3), None) I made ...


3

You need to convert the AveragePoints to a number before sorting, like this sorted(data, key = lambda item : float(item["AveragePoints"]), reverse = True) Now the AveragePoints values will be compared as floats, so that the sorting will be proper. Note: If you are sure that the AveragePoints will be an integer always, you can use int function instead of ...


3

To avoid the potential IndexError you can do ([d['port'] for d in DDD if d['name']=='mouse'] or [None])[0] This gets the first element of the list comprehension unless the list comprehension results in an empty list, in which case we get the contents of the [None] list following the or operator. But if the real DDD is large and you want to look up lots ...



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