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14

Because you only have one element, your list code simply skips a hash check and does no extra work. Because you have such a long key, the dictionary is doing even more work to compute the key's hash, whereas the list implementation skips all of that because the strings are reference-equal (it doesn't need to compare the content at all). Add more items and ...


6

I had a similar problem before and finally solved it like this: let intersect a b = Map (seq { for KeyValue(k, va) in a do match Map.tryFind k b with | Some vb -> yield k, (va, vb) | None -> () })


6

Implement an IEqualityComparer for List<string> that compares two list based on their content. Then just use Distinct on Values and check the count: dictionary.Values.Distinct(new ListEqualityComparer()).Count() == 1


6

It is quite simple: In [1]: keys = ['a','b','c'] In [2]: values = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]] In [7]: dict(zip(keys, zip(*values))) Out[7]: {'a': (1, 4, 7), 'b': (2, 5, 8), 'c': (3, 6, 9)} If you need lists as values: In [8]: dict(zip(keys, [list(t) for t in zip(*values)])) Out[8]: {'a': [1, 4, 7], 'b': [2, 5, 8], 'c': [3, 6, 9]} or: In [9]: ...


6

Before your printing loop, the populated mp elements are [6] and [8]. When you call cout ... << mp[i] to print with i 0, it inserts a new element [0] with the default value 0, returning a reference to that element which then gets printed, then your loop test i < mp.size() actually compares against the new size of 3. Other iterations add further ...


5

As a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> implements IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> you may use Linq. The following Linq will get what you are after: dict.SelectMany(kvp => kvp.Value).Distinct() The SelectMany will select all of the elements of the lists, the Distinct() ensures duplicate elements are only returned once. As stated in ...


5

You could use a dict comprehension: new_d = {k:v for k, v in d.items() if v == 3} Note that you should call d.iteritems() in Python 2.x to avoid creating an unnecessary list. As you can see from the timeit.timeit tests below, this solution is more efficient: >>> from timeit import timeit >>> d = {1: 2, 2: 2, 3: 1, 4: 1, 5: 1, 6: 1, ...


5

Dictionary does not have formally defined order - so you need separate structure that orders players. Indeed you can enumerate elements and you will get an order (it will likely be the same order all the time due to implementation details) - so if you need just get list of all players in dictionary regular Dictionary.Values will give you the collection. ...


5

If you're using a version of JavaScript that supports arrow functions, you could use those: d = d.map((d) => _.omit(d, 'password')); Or if you're repeating the same code a lot, you can make helper functions: function removePasswords(d) { return d.map(function (d) { return _.omit(d, 'password'); }); } d = removePasswords(d); If ...


4

dictionary["territory"], dictionary["numeric_id"], dictionary["continent"] = line.split(',') You almost had it, you just hadn't split the line.


4

The methods had to be overridden in order to have their own Javadoc. Other reasons why you would declare a method in a subinterface are the ability to restrict the return type or to add annotations, but they didn't do that in this case so that was not the reason. The Javadoc is part of the contract of the interface. In Java 6, Sun/Oracle felt the need to ...


4

Map<Dept, List<String>> namesInDept = peopleInDept.entrySet().stream() .collect(toMap(Map.Entry::getKey, e -> e.getValue().stream() .map(Person::getName) .collect(toList()));


4

It cannot be done like that directly. My suggestion would be to add yet another, non-generic, base class: class MyBase { ... } class MyBase<T> : MyBase { ... } And then make a dictionary of that base: Dictionary<string,MyBase>


4

You just need to sort the items by the length of the value. items = sorted(d.items(), key=lambda i: len(i[1]), reverse=True)


4

That happens because a dictionary lookup always returns an optional - since the preceding if should ensure that the element exists, you can safely apply the forced unwrapping operator on that: dict[index]! += [user] However running a test on a playground resulted in a runtime exception - I think this condition: if find(letterList, index) != 0 { is not ...


4

The OrderBy method you're using is a LINQ Extension method which in this instance returns an IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<,>>. It doesn't sort the dictionary in place, nor does it return a sorted dictionary. It simply enumerates the dictionary and returns a sorted enumerable. This is why you have to call it when traversing (or at least use its ...


4

You can use the following dict comprehension ,: >>> s="dtoxe_n_18_cdmos=0.0000e+000, dxl_n_18_cdmos=0.0000e+000, du0_n_18_cdmos=0.0000e+000, dvth0_n_18_cdmos=0.0000e+000" >>> d={k:v for k,v in [i.split('=') for i in s.split(',')]} >>> d {' du0_n_18_cdmos': '0.0000e+000', ' dxl_n_18_cdmos': '0.0000e+000', 'dtoxe_n_18_cdmos': ...


4

What you probably want is to compose the different string mapping functions into a single function that you can then pass to a map() operation. The functions that end up getting composed can be determined at runtime using program logic, data in data structures, etc. Before we dive in, a few unrelated tips that I'll use in my examples: Don't use reduce((a, ...


4

In answer to your "is it possible" question, one must say "not quite", because no Python construct matches the syntax you show: dictt = { 'KEY_1':[,,,,,,,,], [,,,,,,,,], [,,,,,,,,], 'KEY_2':[,,,,,,,,], [,,,,,,,,], [,,,,,,,,], 'KEY_3':[,,,,,,,,], [,,,,,,,,], [,,,,,,,,], } Entering this would be a syntax error, and no code can thus build the ...


4

You could use a regular expression: import re from itertools import islice pattern = re.compile(r'textA|textB|textC|textD') with open('file.html', 'r') as lines: for line in islice(lines, 18, 19): line = pattern.sub('', line) where I kept pattern deliberately verbose; presumably your real replacements don't all start with text; otherwise you ...


3

Maybe you can use a HashSet. Put all the stop words into a HashSet before you begin reading the sentences. Then for each word check if the word is a stop word using: stopWordsHashSet.contains(word);


3

Something like this? for key in d: if key in x: print d[key] This will loop through every key in the dictionary, and if the key appears in x then it will print the value of x.


3

The compiler error is right - you cannot assign concrete type of dictionary (parametrized with one type of key) to another, different (with other key type) - types doesn't match (as you mentioned). One possible solution could be changing extension method arguments to accept IDictionary as parameter. Unfortunotely it also won't help - becaues that interface ...


3

use a defaultdict and just sort the output if you actually want it sorted by least to most frequent: sorted_no = defaultdict(int) for line in customers: rows = line.split(";") sorted_no[rows[0]] += 1 Or just use a Counter dict: from collections import Counter with open('customers.txt') as customers: c = Counter(line.split(";")[0] for line in ...


3

The code in the first case uses the collection initializer syntax. To be able to use the collection initializer syntax, a class must: Collection Initializers: Implement the IEnumerable interface. Define an accessible Add() method. So a class defined like so may use the syntax: public class CollectionInitializable : IEnumerable { public void ...


3

The main advantage here with a dictionary is consistency. With a dictionary, initialization did not look the same as usage. For example, you could do: var dict = new Dictionary<int,string>(); dict[3] = "foo"; dict[42] = "bar"; But using initialization syntax, you had to use braces: var dict = new Dictionary<int,string> { {3, "foo"}, ...


3

This should do the trick var lists = dic.Select(kv => kv.Value.OrderBy(x => x)).ToList(); var first = lists.First(); var areEqual = lists.Skip(1).All(hs => hs.SequenceEqual(first)); You'll need to add some checks to make this work for the empty case. ...or if you want to take @Selman's approach here's an implementation of the IEqualityComparer: ...


3

As mentioned by Richard Corden I think that you really want to be using a std::multimap. std::multimap<int, Affector*> affectors; If you also make tempAff and tempAff2 std::multimaps you can do: affectors.insert(tempAff.begin(), tempAff.end()); affectors.insert(tempAff2.begin(), tempAff2.end());


3

This is a very weird way to handle data. I would use a nested dicts: exampleDictionary = {'thing on ground': {'backpack': {'tea': 'Earl Grey'}}} print exampleDictionary['thing on ground'] print exampleDictionary['thing on ground']['backpack'] print exampleDictionary['thing on ground']['backpack']['tea'] Outputs: {'backpack': {'tea': 'Earl Grey'}} ...


3

Create a class to deserialize your json: To create classes, you can copy the json in clipboard and use the Edit / Paste special / Paste JSON as class in visual studio (I use vs2013). [TestMethod] public void test() { string json = "{\"labels\" : [{\"id\" : \"1\",\"descrizione\" : \"Etichetta interna\",\"tipo\" : ...



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