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1

TFS already associates changesets with a build. Perhaps this is what you are looking for: Writing the Build Report with Associated Changesets and Work Items to a file as part of the build


1

If your goal is to improve readability i would suggest using underscorejs (http://underscorejs.org/). Here's how you can do it with underscorejs: function diff(o1, o2){ return _.chain(_.keys(o1)) .map(function(e){ return [e, (o1[e] - (o2[e] || 0))]; }) .object() .value(); } first = [1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3] second = [1, 1, 2, 2, 2] firstCount = ...


0

If you are on linux you could also use "meld" tool... It makes great diff, and you can easily do a merge...


0

Easiest way I found is to use: diff -N -q <dir1> <dir2>


0

Use the dry-run (-n) option of git add: git add -A -n


0

Linux seems to have a different set of tools on board than OSX. The above (md5) looks nice, but doesn't work, as md5 is md5sum and returns the file name of the checked file on each line. My version on RH linux: Create equal files first: for i in `seq -w 1 20` ; do echo one > test${i}.txt ; done Then run this: md5sum *.txt | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | sort -u ...


2

A relatively simple one-liner might suffice: Tested on OSX, md5 -q file*.txt | sort -u If you see more than one line as output, the files are not the same


0

Put this script in the directory which has file*.txt and run #!/bin/bash FILES=./file*.txt for filename in $FILES; do for other in $FILES; do if [ "$filename" != "$other" ] then cmp -s $filename $other retval=$? if [ $retval -eq 0 ] then echo "$filename $other are same" ...


3

If you just want a quick visual "are the same" answer, I'd use; md5sum file*.txt


0

If you are just comparing two files, then try: diff "$source_file" "$dest_file" # without -q or cmp "$source_file" "$dest_file" # without -s in order to see the supposed differences. You can also try md5sum: md5sum "$source_file" "$dest_file" If any suggestions please do reply...!


1

One way to achieve this is by taking screenshots (automatically) of the 2 dom structure and comparing those images. that way you are not saving/rendering the dom. you can even use a headless browser like node to do it for you, making it quick and easily integrated into your automated testing. There are several tools to help you do this rather then writing ...


1

You are misunderstanding the definition of D-path and snake. From page 4: Let a D-path be a path starting at (0,0) that has exactly D non-diagonal edges. A 0-path must consist solely of diagonal edges. By a simple induction, it follows that a D-path must consist of a (D − 1)-path followed by a non-diagonal edge and then a possibly empty sequence of ...


2

You're using the wrong kind of quotes. Assuming that $current_unavail and $test are two shell variables, each containing the name of a file, you should be doing this: diff "$current_unavail" "$test" Backticks ` are used for command substitutions (like a=`cmd`), although the preferred syntax is a=$(cmd). To compare a file /tmp/ran with a variable ...


0

I managed to do this by using the output of git blame, of the commit in question and his parent, to pick up the line numbers that have been modified and then I made a parse using ASTParse (jdt) to calculate which are the boundary lines of each method. Finally I just do a search passing the number of the lines that have changed within the range of each method ...


2

diff takes two filenames as arguments, where you appear to be passing in file contents as the first argument. You will want to change your script/commands to look more like: current_unavail=/tmp/unavail_cn.out result=$(diff $current_unavail /moes/home/pharthiphan/scripts/monitoring/unavail_cn/$last_unavail) Alternatively, you can use Process Substitution ...


0

I recommend the tool Sublime Text.


0

Might be easier to just modify the data. This removes the space and everything after in each element: $rows = preg_replace('/ .*/', '', $rows); Then array_diff() should work as expected.


3

I think something like this should work: (Here I just use array_udiff() with a anonymous function where I only use the first part of the file data and compare it with the database data) <?php $result = array_udiff($fileData, $dbData, function($a, $b) { if(strcasecmp(explode(" ", $a)[0], $b) == 0) return 0; return ...


-1

gitg does this. gitg path/to/file


1

Here is an example of how this can work using pugixml. For the purposes of the test the XML files are stored in std::istringstream objects, that can be replaced by std::ifstream objects to read from files. #include <set> #include <string> #include <sstream> #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> #include "pugixml.hpp" ...


0

Adapting Anentropic's great answer to Python 3 (basically, change iteritems() to items(), and basestring to string): from lxml import etree import xmltodict # pip install xmltodict def normalise_dict(d): """ Recursively convert dict-like object (eg OrderedDict) into plain dict. Sorts list values. """ out = {} for k, v in ...


1

Would it be feasible for you to create a separate tool that, given two similar DAGs, outputs the "merge" of them? If that's possible, then visualizing the merge DAG will probably tell you a lot about both DAGs. You can color-code the nodes by whether they appear in both DAGs or in either. That's how we originally designed the visual diffs of workflow graphs ...


0

It looks like you're doing a line-wise compare of zipped tar archives, after sorting the lines. There are multiple reasons why this is a bad idea (for one: sorting by like for something that is gzipped doesn't make sense). To check whether 2 files, either use diff file1 file2, or calculate a hash for each file (with md5/md5sum filename) and compare those. ...


0

I'm not sure that gzip archive can be used as a hash-function. Perhaps gzip packaging implementation relies on current date-time and then produces different output for each execution. I'd recommend to use some widely used hash function. Take a look at git internal hash implementation - shasum, for example. More at: How does git compute file hashes?


2

Judging by this Trac comment, this diff isn't applicable as-is, but needs some editing to become a valid patch. The file's creator later commented that he doesn't know what he did wrong, there. 117e99511e0985701780ed1bcd3afd456e244ae3 (from the diff's first line) is a valid commit ID in the django git repo. Probably, it's what the revision this change was ...


0

The above answer is close to correct, but it doesn't really emulate array_diff correctly. The following function is similar, but acts more closely to how you'd expect array_diff to work (also with less silly variable names): function array_diff_recursive($arr1, $arr2) { $outputDiff = []; foreach ($arr1 as $key => $value) { if ...


0

The solution for me was to use git difftool. I wrote this tool https://github.com/chestozo/dmp based on https://code.google.com/p/google-diff-match-patch/. Sometimes it also gives better diff comparing to git diff --color-words=. :)


0

This is the best one I've found. http://code.stephenmorley.org/php/diff-implementation/


0

The most optimal approach to upgrading a framework say, in your case Twitter Bootstrap, I would recommened just replacing the current file paths to your css and js on your <head>....</head> (or bottom of the page) to a CDN (Content Delivery Network) without having to necessarily remove or edit your older files (You can however remove them later ...


0

Ok, this is what I've come up with. (It may not be the most efficient but I believe it's a fine solution for this project). Here's the code (explanation below): public static List<DocumentCompare> CompareDocuments(WordprocessingDocument doc1, WordprocessingDocument doc2) { XDocument xDoc1 = doc1.MainDocumentPart.GetXDocument(); ...


1

M4A is a container format, and would almost certainly contain some metadata. It's very likely some of this metadata is different from one encoding to another, as you suspect. You might do better writing some kind of algorithm to see if your M4A file contains a byte stream that matches the AAC data you have. One way to approach this would be to compare ...


0

Search in any revision, any files: git rev-list --all | xargs git grep <regexp> Search only in some given files, for example xml files: git rev-list --all | xargs -I{} git grep <regexp> {} -- "*.xml" The result lines should look like this: 6988bec26b1503d45eb0b2e8a4364afb87dde7af:bla.xml: text of the line it found... You can then get more ...


0

http://javers.org can calculate a nice diff between thwo complex Java object graphs, but can't apply it back to revert changes. Still, you can retrieve a prevoius versions of audited object (as snapshots) from Repository


0

KDiff3 is an open source file and directory diff and merge tool. Runs under Linux, Windows & MacOSX http://kdiff3.sourceforge.net/


3

If your files are not sorted, you can sort them using the sort command. Note that this command does not sort the file in-line, but prints the sorted version of file on stdout. bash has a feature called process substitution. The stdout (or stdin as required) of the process is used as a file handle in /dev/fd/xxx & passed to the process. (diff in example ...


1

An efficient way to store/utilize the DOM and differences in the DOM can be found with ReactJS. They use a Virtual DOM to abstract away the DOM. There are also other Virtual DOM implementations.


0

You may use use the command git cherry to retrieve the commit done on the specific_feature branch and which does not appear on the origin/new_feature branch. git cherry origin/new_feature specific_feature You can then create a new branch from master and cherry-pick all these commits. But if you dependencies between your development on specific_feature and ...


1

You can try to apply the original patch using patch in dry mode: patch -p2 --dry-run -i patch2.diff -p2 means that first two components will be stripped, that is a/_test_html/. If no errors occurred then run again without --dry-run .


1

git apply example.patch error: patch failed: includes/example.inc:233 error: includes/example.inc: patch does not apply is an often reoccuring error. I've read that this happens because git couldn't apply the changes in the patch because it wasn't able to find the line(s) of code in question; they must have been changed or removed by another commit. ...


2

That seems a job for git rebase --onto: git rebase --onto master new_feature specific_feature That will take only the commits after new_feature up to specific_feature HEAD, and replay them onto master. Note that you will then have to force push specific_feature to upstream (if you already pushed it before): git push --force specific_feature. That can be ...


0

this should does the job: diff -rq dir1 dir2


2

For a straight binary comparison, you can just work a chunk at a time. (4kB is probably quite enough per chunk though you can pick larger values; I/O overhead will dominate in any case.) The simplest way to express this is with a loop inside a try…finally (requires Tcl 8.6): proc sameContent {file1 file2} { set f1 [open $file1 "rb"] set f2 [open ...


1

proc comp_file {file1 file2} { # optimization: check file size first set equal 0 if {[file size $file1] == [file size $file2]} { set fh1 [open $file1 r] set fh2 [open $file2 r] set equal [string equal [read $fh1] [read $fh2]] close $fh1 close $fh2 } return $equal } if {[comp_file /tmp/foo ...


2

Use the option -N. The man page says: -N, --new-file treat absent files as empty


0

In Linux/CygWin a handy script I use at times is: #Extract the jar (war or ear) cd dir1 jar xvf jar-file1 for i in `ls *.class` do javap $i > ${i}.txt #list the functions/variables etc done cd dir2 jar xvf jar-file2 for i in `ls *.class` do javap $i > ${i}.txt #list the functions/variables etc done diff -r dir1 dir2 #diff recursively


0

The approach of running diff -qr old/ new/ has one major drawback: it may miss files in newly created directories. E.g. in the example below the file data/pages/playground/playground.txt is not in the output of diff -qr old/ new/ whereas the directory data/pages/playground/ is (search for playground.txt in your browser to quickly compare). I also posted the ...


1

As long as they are on the index they will appear on the commit -v message. You can either add them to .gitignore (but I don't think that is what you want), or manually remove the unwanted comments for each commit.


0

I recommend the following tool: http://sourceforge.net/projects/csvcomparator/ The easiest way to use this comparator is to have the same header names in both files and the fields are separated with comma as in your example, but have the first column as the identifierColumn(which is used to determine which records should be compared to each other) then you ...


0

This is expected behaviour as per diffutils manual: However, -I only ignores the insertion or deletion of lines that contain the regular expression if every changed line in the hunk (every insertion and every deletion) matches the regular expression. In other words, for each non-ignorable change, diff prints the complete set of changes in its ...


0

To use visual diff, you can try DiffMerge. Its rulesets and options provide for customized behavior. From the command-line perspective, you can use --ignore-matching-lines=RE option for diff, for example: diff -d -I '^#' -I '^ #' file1 file2 Please note that the regex has to match the corresponding line in both files and it matches every changed line in ...



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