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674

2¢: I have two aliases I normally throw in my ~/.gitconfig file: [alias] lg1 = log --graph --abbrev-commit --decorate --date=relative --format=format:'%C(bold blue)%h%C(reset) - %C(bold green)(%ar)%C(reset) %C(white)%s%C(reset) %C(dim white)- %an%C(reset)%C(bold yellow)%d%C(reset)' --all lg2 = log --graph --abbrev-commit --decorate --format=format:'%C(bold ...


108

for textual output you can try: git log --graph --abbrev-commit --decorate --date=relative --all OR git log --graph --oneline --decorate --date=relative --all or here's a graphviz alias for drawing the DAG graph. I personally use gitx, gitk --all and gitnub.


61

I would try to sort the graph topologically, and if you can't, then it has cycles.


33

Gitg is a clone of Gitk and GitX for GNOME (it also works on KDE etc.) which shows a pretty colored graph. It is actively developed (as of 2012). It lets you sort the commits (graph nodes) either chronologically or topologically, and hide commits that don't lead to a selected branch. It works fine with large repositories and complex dependency graphs. ...


28

SourceTree is a really good one. It does print out a good looking and medium size history and branch graph: (the following is done on an experimental Git project just to see some branches). Supports Windows 7+ and Mac OS X 10.6+. http://www.sourcetreeapp.com/


27

Doing a simple depth-first-search is not good enough to find a cycle. It is possible to visit a node multiple times in a DFS without a cycle existing. Depending on where you start, you also might not visit the entire graph. You can check for cycles in a connected component of a graph as follows. Find a node which has only outgoing edges. If there is no such ...


26

Depends on what they looked like. I use gitx which makes pictures like this one: You can compare git log --graph vs. gitk on a 24-way octopus merge (originally from http://clojure-log.n01se.net/date/2008-12-24.html):


26

Based on a Graphviz script I found in an answer to a related question, I've hacked up a ruby script that creates a summary view of a git repository. It elides all linear history and just shows "interesting" commits, i.e. those with multiple parents, multiple children, or pointed to by a branch or tag. Here's a snippet of the graph it generates for jquery: ...


23

Dagre author here. Dagre doesn't include any of the graphviz code - it is pure JavaScript. It is based on similar layout techniques though; both are based on techniques from the Sugiyama paper. You can find some examples of dagre here: http://cpettitt.github.io/project/dagre-d3/latest/demo/interactive-demo.html ...


22

git-forest is an excellent perl script I've been using for more than a year and I hardly use the git log command directly any more. These are some of the things I love about this script: It uses unicode characters to draw the lines in the graph giving a more continuous look to the graph lines. You can combine --reverse with the graph output, which is not ...


19

gitg: a gtk-based repository viewer, that's new but interesting and useful http://git.gnome.org/browse/gitg I use it currently


17

For more detailed textual output, please try: git log --graph --date-order -C -M --pretty=format:"<%h> %ad [%an] %Cgreen%d%Creset %s" --all --date=short You can write alias in $HOME/.gitconfig [alias] graph = log --graph --date-order -C -M --pretty=format:\"<%h> %ad [%an] %Cgreen%d%Creset %s\" --all ...


15

I just wrote one tool that can generate pretty git commits graph using HTML/Canvas. And provide a jQuery plugin which make it easy to use. [github] https://github.com/tclh123/commits-graph Preview:


14

Are you looking for topological sort? This imposes an ordering (a sequence or list) on a DAG. It's used by, for example, spreadsheets, to figure out dependencies between cells for calculations.


14

I'm going to go against my intuition and assume this isn't homework. You have to take advantage of the information that a topological ordering gives you. Whenever you examine the node n in a topological ordering, you have the guarantee that you've already traversed every possible path to n. Using this it's clear to see that you can generate the shortest path ...


14

Gitgraph.js - not mentioned yet - it allows to draw pretty git branches without a repository. Just write a Javascript code that will configure your branches and commits and render it in browser. var gitGraph = new GitGraph({ template: "blackarrow", mode: "compact", orientation: "horizontal" }); var master = ...


12

I advise you to use Gephi. This soft is able to do all the things you want to, especially graph layouts !


12

Built on top of TikZ & PGF, gitdags is a little LaTeX package that allows you to effortlessly produce vector-graphics commit graphs, and more. Automatic generation of an existing repository's commit graph is not the purpose of gitdags; the graphs it produces are only meant for educational purposes. I often use it to produce graphs for my answers to Git ...


11

graph = structure consisting of nodes, that are connected to each other with edges directed = the connections between the nodes (edges) have a direction: A -> B is not the same as B -> A acyclic = "non-circular" = moving from node to node by following the edges, you will never encounter the same node for the second time. Basically a directed acyclic ...


11

You are looking for all paths between one node and another in a directed acyclic graph (DAG). A tree is always a DAG, but a DAG isn't always a tree. The difference is that a tree's branches are not allowed to join, only divide, while a DAG's branches can flow together, so long as no cycles are introduced. Your solution can be found as find_all_paths() in ...


11

As you said yourself, using shared_ptr in both directions will create circles that create mem leaks and are hard to find and to break - you will lose (nearly) all of the benefits shared_ptr provides. So weak_ptr it shall be. You say your algorithms have to lock the weak_ptr - I beg to differ. The algorithms have to get a parent shared_ptr from the node. ...


10

You could always have a (read-only) graph interface, and extend it with a read/write modifiable-graph interface: public interface IDirectedAcyclicGraph { int GetNodeCount(); bool GetConnected(int from, int to); } public interface IModifiableDAG : IDirectedAcyclicGraph { void SetNodeCount(int nodeCount); void SetConnected(int from, int to, ...


9

Take a look at this jsfiddle. It contains what I believe reasonable code for generating the binomial lattice that you described. Here is the output of the fiddle: By changing variable N only, you can obtain lattices of different sizes: I didn't include elements above and beside the lattice, since it is pretty straightforward for you to add them. The ...


8

Lemma 22.11 on the Book Introduction to Algorithms (Second Edition) states that: "A directed graph G is acyclic if and only if a depth-first search of G yields no back edges"


8

You can take advantage of XPath's implicit existential quantification on the = operator: <xsl:for-each select="//vertex[not(@name = //vertex/directed-edge-to/@vertex)]"> When you use any of the six comparison operators (=, !=, <, <=, >, and >=) to compare a node-set, the expression will return true if any node in the node-set satisfies ...


8

I found this example of modeling a directed acyclic graph in SQL: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/database/Modeling_DAGs_on_SQL_DBs.aspx?msg=3051183


8

Label each node and make an edge list. That is, for each node store the nodes that it has edges to, for example: { "a": [ "b", "c", "d" ], "b": [ "d" ], "c": [ "d" ], "d": [ ] } You can store many kinds of graphs this way, not just DAGs, so you will need to post-process it to make sure that it has no loops. Just pick a node, DFS, if you see any ...


8

Start by solving the simpler problem: given two points A and B in a DAG can you count all the paths that start with A and end with B? (A "path" is defined as a list of edges where the end node of one is equal to the start node of the next.) Sounds hard. Can we simplify it? Well clearly the most trivial case is where A and B are actually the same node. In ...


7

Traverse the graph building a set of reversed edges and a list of leaf nodes. Perform a topological sort of the reversed edges using the leaf (which are now root) nodes to start with. Construct the reversed graph based on the reversed edges starting from the end of the sorted list. As the nodes are constructed in reverse topological order, you are ...



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