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15

UPDATE: I'm also playing around with this alternative float random( vec2 p ) // Version 2 { // e^pi (Gelfond's constant) // 2^sqrt(2) (Gelfond–Schneider constant) vec2 r = vec2( 23.14069263277926, 2.665144142690225 ); //return fract( cos( mod( 12345678., 256. * dot(p,r) ) ) ); // ver1 return fract(cos(dot(p,r)) * 123456.); // ver2 } // ...


8

I would recommend you download the DirectX SDK June 2010. DirectX allows you to pick what version of DirectX you want to use while creating the device, so don't worry about that. This is done in the D3D11CreateDeviceAndSwapChain in the D3D_FEATURE_LEVEL. A pointer to an array of D3D_FEATURE_LEVELs, which determine the order of feature levels to ...


6

you forgot one thing: Go to VC++ Directories -> Library Directories add $(DXSDK_DIR)LIB\x86 apply. Done. Hope this helps


6

The immediate problem I see with your code is that you're applying a shader to the lines themselves. Pixel shaders don't really work that way. You can't interact with any of the pixels around the pixel being shaded. All you get is registers (position, colour, texture coordinate, etc) and samplers (textures) for that one pixel that is being output. To work ...


6

In C and C++ a macro is a "replace this with that" type mechanism, and not at all the same as a function in a lot of senses. It can SOMETIMES be used to replace a function, but you should be very careful. Some famous "failures" in macros used as functions are as follows: #define SQR(x) x * x .... int x = 5; int s = SQR(x+1); This will not give 36, but ...


6

Part of the solution was a simple precision data type problem. Exchange the speed calculation by a constant, and you'll see a extremely smooth movement. Analysing the calculation showed that you're storing the result from QueryPerformanceCounter() inside a float. QueryPerformanceCounter() returns a number which looks like this on my computer: 724032629776. ...


5

What you generally do when you want a random value in a pixel shader is to pass in a texture containing noise. While it's not actually "random" - it looks random. For example, here's some code from a pixel shader I have lying around: float3 random = (tex2D(noiseTexture, texCoord * noiseScale + noiseOffset)); The texture I use is an RGB-noise texture, ...


5

It's kind of awkward to answer my own question, but after some more digging and by simple trial and error, I found the solution. At first, I had to change the way I loaded my texture. To prevent it from internally resizing to a Power-of-Two size, I had to use the following method: Texture texture = Texture.FromFile(_graphicsDevice, [filePath], ...


5

Okay, I found a solution for those interested. The Vertex Shader should have the following structs defined: struct VS_INPUT { float4 Pos : POSITION0; float3 Normal : NORMAL0; }; struct VS_OUTPUT { float4 Pos : POSITION0; float4 PosOut : TEXCOORD0; float3 Normal : TEXCOORD1; }; The VS_OUTPUT struct should be different in the pixel ...


4

You don't have to destroy the buffer every frame. Create a dynamic buffer. Check out the article Using Vertex Buffers With DirectX, if you haven't already: For dynamic vertex buffers, which contain information about primitives that change often in the scene, we need to specify the D3DUSAGE_DYNAMIC | D3DUSAGE_WRITEONLY flags for the Usage and the ...


4

I had to add the d3d9.lib file to my linker's additional dependencies, just like GSerg said.


4

Speaking of DirectX only here, but I remember we had the same kind of issue once (5 graphics card and 9 screens for a single PC). Lot of times full screen switch seems to want to enable vertical sync on monitors, and since Present can't be threaded, the more screens with vertical sync the higher drop you will have (since you will wait between 0 and 16 ...


4

You can't detect any version above DirectX 9 from the registry. It's simply not stored in there. For versions 10 and above, you should use the COM interface to DXDiag. Instantiate a DXDiagProvider (CoCreateInstance( CLSID_DxDiagProvider, ... IID_IDxDiagProvider, ... ) Initialize it (pDxDiagProvider->Initialize) Open the root container ...


4

Since i don't know a good answer, maybe this is the same question with more and better answers: IDirect3DDevice9Ex and D3DPOOL_MANAGED? Good luck!


4

AFAIK, DirectX does not support wavefront object files out of the box. You will need an external mesh loader for that purpose. I can remember, that in the DX 10 SDK is a sample of how to load an .obj file, I think the sample is called MeshFromOBJ10. I don't know if it is of any use in DirectX 9. As far as I know, the standard .x just supports basic meshes ...


4

char *Result = new char[PathLength+FileLength]; Result pointed data should end with the termination character \0. Or you will run into problems when returned such a string pointed by Result. So, Result[PathLength+FileLength-1] = '\0' ; Make sure you never overrun the buffer or even a better option is to use std::string.


4

The ID3DXSPRITE interface you are using is already pretty efficient. Make sure all your sprite draw calls happen in one batch if possible between the sprite begin and end calls. This allows the sprite interface to arrange the draws in the most efficient way. For extra performance you can load multiple smaller textures in to one larger texture and use ...


4

Your member function is const-qualified. You cannot modify any member variables from within a const-qualified member function unless they are declared mutable. You need to make pDrawMesh mutable, remove the const-qualification from DrawMeshContainer, or find some other way to accomplish whatever it is you are trying to accomplish.


4

You could add an argument for the function name, and pass in the __FUNCTION__ macro: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b0084kay%28v=vs.80%29.aspx And you could also define a macro that will automatically replace ...log...() with ...log...(__FUNCTION__).


4

You should make sure you have ALL paths sorounded by quotes ("). Instead of $(DXSDK_DIR)include you should have "$(DXSDK_DIR)include"


4

I had to exend my buffer to allow for 4 vertex array size: d3dDevice->CreateVertexBuffer(4*sizeof(CUSTOMVERTEX), 0, CUSTOMFVF, D3DPOOL_MANAGED, &vBuffer, NULL); And then changed the draw primitive from TRIANGLELIST to STRIP extending the amount of triangles drawn to 2 d3dDevice->DrawPrimitive (D3DPT_TRIANGLESTRIP, 0, 2 ); ...


4

With C++11, the language added a feature called moving for exactly the reason you are encountering. And luckily, modifying your code to use move mechanics is amazingly simple: class Texture { public: Texture() noexcept; Texture(Direct3D& d3d, unsigned int width, unsigned int height, const std::vector<unsigned char>& stream); ...


3

Same thing happened to me. It looks like that TrustedInstaller took ownership of some registry keys (including HKLM/SOFTWARE/Microsoft/Direct3D which dxcpl modifies). Found a solution here. You just have to change ownership of that regkey.


3

Your second TEXCOORD needs to have UsageIndex set to 1. The documentation for D3DDECLUSAGE does cover this: D3DDECLUSAGE_TEXCOORD Texture coordinate data. Use D3DDECLUSAGE_TEXCOORD, n to specify texture coordinates in fixed function vertex processing and in pixel shaders prior to ps_3_0. These can be used to pass user defined data. The value ...


3

Move both the position of the camera and where it's looking: void world_view:: MoveRight(float units) { struct_world_view.vLookAt.x += units; struct_world_view.vPosition.x += units; } Edit: also - if you only want to be able to move right, you may want to check for negative units.


3

The "Swap Chain" approach you used for rendering the multiple windows is sounds good compare to creating multiple devices for multiple screens. Have you checked the codesampler tutorial for rendering the multiple windows using swap chain. If not, pls find the below link which has a working sample project for rendering the multiple windows using swap chain. ...


3

The legacy Effect framework is not supported on Windows 8 Metro (because D3DCompiler_xx.dll is not supported), so you should better work with another solution. Also, Effect is deprecated by Microsoft and no longer supported. The old Direct3D9 technique(compiled with vs_2_0 or ps_2_0) are not stored in FX files compiled with fx_5_0 (just check the output of ...


3

There are many approaches, but if you can afford to make the balls overlap a bit (that is, to make part of the ball "enter" the other) you can turn it into a spring-damper system and solve with Hooke's law. Since Hooke's law give you the force, you need to integrate it to find the momentum. Momentum divided by mass is the velocity you're looking for. Take ...


3

You're getting that error because those texture formats are not allowed. Textures being shared from D3D9 to D3D11 have the following restrictions: Textures must be 2D Only 1 mip level is allowed Texture must have default usage Texture must be write only MSAA textures are not allowed Bind flags must have SHADER_RESOURCE and ...


3

DirectX 11 uses "feature levels" to capture the bulk of device capabilities in set stair-step fashion. You should read about feature levels on MSDN and in this blog post. Feature Level 9.1 supports 16-bit indices and Feature Level 9.2 or later supports 32-bit indices. The MaxVertexIndex is essentially the same as "Max Primitive Count" on the MSDN Feature ...



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