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5

Is point (xa, ya) within the circle at (xc, yc) with radius r? Remember pythagoras? - It determines the distance between two points, and all you need to determine if something is within a circle with a given radius, is to determine if the distance to the center of the circle, is less than the radius: bool IsPointInCircle(float xa, float ya, float xc, float ...


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idata = mIV doesn't copy any data. What you want is memcpy(mapSub.pData, &mIV[0].world, instDesc.ByteWidth) assuming the world member is the entire contents of mIV[i] and is contiguous in memory.


2

Try calling ID2D1RenderTarget::FillRectangle, which "Paints the interior of the specified rectangle", instead of DrawRectangle, which "Draws the outline of a rectangle that has the specified dimensions and stroke style".


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Perhaps the most obvious difference is that DirectX, as opposed to OpenGL, is more than just a graphics API. DirectX contains tools to deal with such components of a game as sound, music, input, networking, and multimedia. On the other hand, OpenGL is strictly a graphics API.


1

Here are a few things that should help you: 1) In RandomMove, your last else doesn't have braces, since you're performing two operations, you should wrap both of them in braces like you did elsewhere 2) float comparison is tricky. It's very unlikely that your PosX == MapX || PosY == MapY will ever trigger. A better idea would be to calculate the distance ...


1

As noted, you can't statically link the "DirectX" libraries i.e. Direct3D, DirectInput, DirectSound, etc. That said, depending exactly on your definition of "any Windows system" you actually do not need the DirectX "Redist". It doesn't do what you think it does. See Not So DirectSetup for the a longer discussion of this. If you use Direct3D 9 or later, ...


1

You're setting the color of the vertices of the quad. All information outputted by the vertexshader is automatically interpolated between the three vertices of a triangle by the rasterizer to generate the fragments. These are passed to the pixelshader, which simply returns the given color leading to the gradient. To circumvent this behaviour, you have 2 ...


1

What you want is a UV coordinates that match geodesic distances. A geodesic distance is basically the distance on the surface as opposed to euclidean distance which is the shortest distance between two points(going through the model if it needs to). A global solution to make a geodesic map is pretty complex. However, locally it may be easier... Since you ...


1

For the DirectX End-User Runtime (aka DirectSetup or DXSETUP), it has long been recommended that you don't even try to uninstall it. In any case, on most versions of Windows you can't 'uninstall' DirectX and running DXSETUP doesn't actually "Install DirectX" either as it's built into the OS. It can only be updated by installing a new version of the OS, ...


1

Create the necessary initialization method in your sprite class. Then in main() create your sprites and call the appropriate initialization methods. If using lots of Sprites, it will be probably handy to put the created sprites inside a vector in order to have less code for cleanup and probably other things. A quick example for a Sprite class called ...


1

Your last vertex is at the same position as your third, so your second triangle is a line and not visible. I think you have a typo in your vertex data and wanted to write { 132.0f, 132.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, D3DCOLOR_XRGB(0, 0, 255), } as your last vertex to make the quad complete.


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To use namespace alias: namespace Colors = DirectX::Colors; and then Colors::...


1

I suggest trying something like this: if (forward) { xAngle += 0.005f * (cos(zAngle)); yAngle += 0.005f * (sin(zAngle)); } if (backward) { xAngle -= 0.005f * (cos(zAngle)); yAngle -= 0.005f * (sin(zAngle)); } I'm going on a hunch here, but try it out!


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The rotation matrix for a rotation around the x-axis of a 3D Cartesian coordinate system is 1 0 0 0 cos(xAngle) sin(xAngle) 0 -sin(xAngle) cos(xAngle) The matrix for a rotation around the y-axis is cos(yAngle) 0 -sin(yAngle) 0 1 0 sin(yAngle) 0 ...


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The back buffer is already in video memory, by the way -- just not necessarily complete when you want it. Your performance issues might actually be due to forcing a pipeline stall while you wait for rendering to finish; it is hard to say from your description. If you draw into an FBO image attachment you can do this without causing a stall, but you will be ...


1

The windowing system is generally independent of the graphics API. On Windows, the HWND's HDC surface is the target for rendering operations, which is true whether you're using DirectX or OpenGL (or GDI+, etc). To create a DirectX device, you need an HWND, so any cross-platform windowing system where you can get a native handle to a created window should ...


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The ID2D1DeviceContext has a method CreateBitmapFromWicBitmap. With its help you can create an ID2D1Bitmap. The only thing you have to do is to create an IWICBitmap from your HICON and then create an IWICFormatConverter, so you can keep the alpha channel. You can do it this way (The snippet from below is a delphi one but in C# should be very similar): ...


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Depending on how your graphics API manages matrices, and how your modelling software exports them, you may have to transpose the matrix before decomposing it, and then transpose the result after recomposing it to get the same result as the original matrix. By the way, the correct order for recomposing is to translate first, then rotate, then scale.



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