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43

My current project actually. Storing 18,000 objects in a normalised structure: 90,000 rows across 8 different tables. Took 1 minute to retrieve and map them to our Java object model, that's with everything correctly indexed etc. Storing them as key/value pairs using a lightweight text representation: 1 table, 18,000 rows, 3 seconds to retrieve them all and ...


39

I've switched a small subproject from MySQL to CouchDB, to be able to handle the load. The result was amazing. About 2 years ago, we've released a self written software on http://www.ubuntuusers.de/ (which is probably the biggest German Linux community website). The site is written in Python and we've added a WSGI middleware which was able to catch all ...


15

Todd Hoff's highscalability.com has a lot of great coverage of NoSQL, including some case studies. The commercial Vertica columnar DBMS might suit your purposes (even though it supports SQL): it's very fast compared with traditional relational DBMSs for analytics queries. See Stonebraker, et al.'s recent CACM paper contrasting Vertica with map-reduce. ...


9

Unfortunately your basic requirements already extend todays general understanding of graphs - even in the academia. No listed pure graph database will be able to satisfy all your needs. Distributed graph algorithms which are aware of large distributed but interconnected graphs are still a big research issue. So for your application it might be best to find ...


7

Open Chord is an implementation of the CHORD protocol in Java. It is a distributed hash table protocol that should fit your needs perfectly.


5

We moved part of our data from mysql to mongodb, not so much for scalability but more because it is a better fit for files and non-tabular data. In production we currently store: 25 thousand files (60GB) 130 million other "documents" (350GB) with a daily turnover of around 10GB. The database is deployed in a "paired" configuration on two nodes (6x450GB ...


4

I apologize for going against your bold text, since I don't have any first-hand experience, but this set of blog posts is a good example of solving a problem with CouchDB. CouchDB: A Case Study Essentially, the textme application used CouchDB to deal with their exploding data problem. They found that SQL was too slow to deal with large amounts of archival ...


4

We've moved some of our data we used to store in Postgresql and Memcached into Redis. Key value stores are much better suited for storing hierarchical object data. You can store blob data much faster and with much less development time and effort than using an ORM to map your blob to a RDBMS. I have an open source c# redis client that lets you store and ...


3

All of the tenants of CAP theory must be worked around in MMOs. The DB is not going to do all the heavy lifting - the server application is just as important, if not more so. Video games need faster response times than a DB is going to be capable of providing. That isn't to say that IT infrastructure and architectural work isn't in place at all levels to ...


3

Mysql's NDB Cluster WILL do this. But it's far from easy to set up and has a lot of gotchas. And also, its performance is generally fairly sucky and it keeps data in memory (yes, I know they sound contradictory). Essentially, updates need to acquire distributed locks throughout the cluster (or at least in the storage node group where those table(s) are ...


3

I have no first-hand experiences., but I found this blog entry quite interesting.


2

Depending on the use case, Terracotta may be just what you need.


2

I find the effort to map software domain objects (e.g. aSalesOrder, aCustomer...) to two-dimensional relational database (rows and columns) takes a lot of code to save/update and then again to instantiate a domain object instance from multiple tables. Not to mention the performance hit of having all those joins, all those disk reads... just to ...


2

Cassandra possibly meets these requirements IF you set a low consistency level for queries, so that each node replies immediately without checking with any other nodes AND set the replication factor to equal the number of nodes (so all data is replicated to all nodes). Why do you have these specific (unusual) requirements, though? i.e. why do you ...


2

The way you put the database into the picture might be misleading: clustering solutions exist for all of the mostly used RDBMS, so that if you need to support your DB activities with more than one DB node you will just have to check the documentation from your DB vendor. More complex scenarios are there when it comes to synchronize your non-DB application ...


2

It seems hard to find .NET based one... I hope this might be helpful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graph_database


2

If you are willing to spend effort in coding, why not join an existing project and adapt/extend it to your needs? For instance, both transparent distribution and RAM only data (optionally persisted) are on the TODO list of HyperGraphDB, so we'd be happy to have you help out :) Actually, being mainly main memory was in HyperGraphDB's original requirements, ...


2

What you're asking is basically an entire branch of computer science. It is very much a non-trivial problem and you will find that a surprising number of things are impossible. Also note that simply saying "consistent" data is not a sufficient definition. There are all sorts of levels of consistency (read-your-own-writes, reads-follow-writes, monotonic ...


2

When sharding you spread the data across different shards. The mongos process routes queries to shards it needs to get data from. As such you only need to look at the data a shard is holding. To quote from When to Use Sharding: You should consider deploying a sharded cluster, if: your data set approaches or exceeds the storage capacity of a ...


1

I switched from MySQL(InnoDB) to cassandra for a M2M system, which basically stores time-series of sensors for each device. Each data is indexed by (device_id,date) and (device_id,type_of_sensor,date). The MySQL version contained 20 millions of rows. MySQL: Setup in master-master synchronization. Few problem appeared around loss of synchronization. It was ...


1

Considering you will have multiple branches (Subscribers) which will make changes offline and occasionally synchronize - this sounds like a good fit for Merge Replication.


1

Yes, it is possible that when you log in again, you log in to a different version of the database. This particular case could be corrected by assigning a specific database version or instance identifier to your account, and have the system connect to that version (if possible) on each login.


1

Wikipedia has a good article on the Airline Reservation System. Quite a few references.


1

I guess you are asking about scalability of RDBMS databases. Talking about NoSQL databases based on ( amazon dynamo, BigTable ) are a whole another topic. I am talking about HBase, Cassandra etc. There are also commerical products like Oracle Coherence thats more like a distributed cache and key value store , to put it crudely. going back to rdbms, ...


1

As for the first part of your question, it rather depends on you precise implementation. If you are going to have a single crawler limited by network bandwidth, then MYiSAM can be quicker. If you are using multiple crawlers then InnoDB will give you advantages such as transactions which may help. AFAIK MySQL doesn't support the hardware configuration you ...


1

Key-value stores are not necessarily fault tolerant. They are primarily performance tools. Only when data is stored on more than one server is there any form of fault tolerance. If it is just safety, reducing single point of failure the simplest solution is probably set up a mirroring solution, where you have a mirror that just tracks the master database. ...


1

We replaced a postgres database with a CouchDB document database because not having a fixed schema was a strong advantage to us. Each document has a variable number of indexes used to access that document.


1

I used redis to store logging messages across machines. It was very easy to implement, and very useful. Redis really rocks


1

I don't. I would like to use a simple and free key-value store that I can call in process but such thing doesn't exist afaik on the Windows platform. Now I use Sqlite but I would like to use something like Tokyo Cabinet. BerkeleyDB has license "issues". However if you want to use the Windows OS your choice of NoSQL databases is limited. And there isn't ...



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