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1

I agree with the original answer (Felix) that forcing Zipf values to a specific range is a very unusual thing, and it likely means that you're doing something wrong. Having said that, I actually had a similar problem, where I really did need to generate Zipf values conforming to a certain criteria. In my case, I wanted to generate a brand new set of data ...


0

If bits are drawn independently with probability 1/2 of getting either a zero or a one, then agreement in position k can be conditioned on the outcome in the kth position of the first string - whether that's a zero or a one, the second string has a probability of 1/2 of matching. That makes the bit-by-bit distributions Bernoulli with p=1/2. Hamming ...


0

Let X and Y be independent random variables whose values are drawn uniformly from the set of binary strings of length n: X, Y ~ U({0,1}n). Let d(X, Y) be the Hamming distance. Then d(X, Y) is a random variable drawn from a Binomial distribution with n possible events, each of probability p = 0.5: d(X, Y) ~ B(n, 0.5). Its expectation is 0.5 × n. Its ...


0

The number of different bits is the sum of a collection of independent variables (namely an indicator variable which is 1 if they are different and 0 if they are the same), all of which have finite variance; therefore the distribution of that number is approximately Gaussian, and becomes more Gaussian as n increases. The exact distribution is binomial, ...


8

Distributions take random bits and turn them into numbers. If you actually want random bits then you want to use an engine directly: std::random_device engine; unsigned x = engine(); // sizeof(unsigned) * CHAR_BIT random bits In particular, those requirements specify the algorithmic interface for types and objects that produce sequences of bits in ...


3

To answer your question: You can't. The standard does not allow std::uniform_int_distribution to be templated on char, signed char, or unsigned char. Some believe that this is a defect in the standard, but it is the case. You can simply template std::uniform_int_distribution on unsigned short, and set its min/max range to std::numeric_limits<unsigned ...


0

In case anyone else has this issue, and it's not solved by @Ninja's sugestion above, try removing extraneous files. For me they were: Gruntfile.js, karma-e2e.conf.js, karma.conf.js, and the entire node_modules directory. see: How to build IPA for distribution with TestFlight with XCode 5?


0

As @radven and @tomek-cejner mentioned sometimes some extra directories could cause problems. Maybe if named improperly? for me the offenders were different. Gruntfile.js, karma-e2e.conf.js, karma.conf.js, and the entire node_modules directory. see: How to build IPA for distribution with TestFlight with XCode 5?


1

There isn't any need for a specialized fitting function; the maximum likelihood estimates for the mean and variance of the distribution are just the sample mean and sample variance. I.e., compute the sample mean and sample variance and you're done.


0

There are a few ways to do this. First, using d for the density as in your question, d$x and d$y contain the x and y values for the density plot. The minimum occurs when the derivative dy/dx = 0. Since the x-values are equally spaced, we can estimate dy using diff(d$y), and seek d$x where abs(diff(d$y)) is minimized: d$x[which.min(abs(diff(d$y)))] # [1] ...


1

I'm guessing that you're not actually studying bathtubs -- maybe it will help others understand what's going on if you say what the actual topic is. I can see at least two directions to go, based on the existing description. (1) Model the motion of a marble using differential equations. You can probably get all kinds of interesting effects -- for some ...


0

With all positive values and the mean being about double the median, your data are definitely skewed right. You can rule out both normal and Laplace because both are symmetric and can go negative. Scope out some of the many fine alternatives at the Wikipedia distributions page. Make a histogram of your data and check it for similarities in shape to those ...


0

I have to say that I usually do it in the same way you did it, by plotting the data I seeing its shape. When being more accurate, and only for the normal distribution, I perform the Shapiro Wilk test for normality, which at least will tell me that the null hypotesis was not proven, which means that it was not possible to prove that the date does not follow ...


0

Updating your normalisation factor when you change a value is trivial. This might suggest an algorithm. w_sum = w_sum_old - w_i_old + w_i_new; If you leave p_i as a computed property p_i = w_i / w_sum you would avoid recalculating the entire p_i array at the cost of calculating p_i every time they are needed. You would, however, be able to update many ...


1

I would actually use a hash set of strings (don't remember the C++ container for it, you might need to implement your own though). Put wi elements for each i, with the values "w1_1", "w1_2",... all through "w1_[w1]" (that is, w1 elements starting with "w1_"). When you need to sample, pick an element at random using a uniform distribution. If you picked ...


4

There are two ways to do this: The first is to generate an exponentially distributed random variable and then limit the values into (1,10). In [14]: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import scipy.stats as ss Lambda = 2.5 #expected mean of exponential distribution is lambda in Scipy's parameterization Size = 1000 trc_ex_rv = ss.expon.rvs(scale=Lambda, ...


0

To get a count of how many people selected Pork and Chicken: SELECT COUNT(*) AS LikesPorkChicken FROM MyTable t1 INNER JOIN Mytable t2 ON t1.Email = t2.Email WHERE t1.Type ='Pork' AND t2.Type = 'Chicken' To get a count of how many people selected Pork and Beef: SELECT COUNT(*) AS LikesPorkBeef FROM MyTable t1 INNER JOIN Mytable t2 ON t1.Email = ...


0

I encontered an important difference between AFINS 2.0 and the original function of TCEV of the article Two-Component Extrem Value Distribution, also implemented in the soft Extreme (Geostru): This is the original: Exp[-a Exp[-x/b] - c Exp[-x/d]] But this is the one that fit well: Exp[-a Exp[-x*b] - c Exp[-x*d]] And this is better fitted by Mathematica if ...


0

Great question. The reason for this error is that the authors of the fitdistrplus package use exists() to check for variations of arguments needed by the function. The following is an excerpt from the code of the fitdist and mledist functions. Where the authors take the value given for distr and search for appropriate density and probability functions in ...


1

First of all, you need to know the correlation between the two normal variables. Like @Luis said, the diagonal will be 15 each but for the covariance, you need to know the correlation between both. They are related by this equation: cov(x,y) = correlation(x,y)*std(x)*std(y) But if you do not know the correlation, then you can calculate the sample ...


1

If the random variables are independent, the off-diaginal elements of the covariance matrix are zero. So that matrix will be diag(std1,std2), where std1 and std2 are the standard deviations of your two variables. In your example you would use diag(15,15). If the random variables are not independent, you need to specify all four elements of the covariance ...


2

As I understand, events will break up the events array into 37*100 separate arguments. This is not true. If you call mp using mp(SNR2, events) then inside mp, events will be a 1-element tuple, (arr,), where arr is the (37, 100)-shaped array. If you call mp using mp(SNR2, *events) then inside mp, events will be a 37-element tuple, where the 37 ...


0

May be that I have to pass some initial or start values. In fact, the program (AFINS 2.0) that I use to validate my results is found here. It first generates initial paameters ("Parametros iniciales" button), then one can adjust the final parameters values. I would use that program but it can show the confidence or prediction bands. Also I would like to ...


0

This "works" in the sense of not throwing that error dist = ProbabilityDistribution[{"CDF", Exp[-a Exp[-x/b] - c Exp[-x/d]]}, {x, -Infinity, Infinity}, Assumptions -> Element[{a, b, c, d}, Reals]] res = FindDistributionParameters[{31, 46, 70, 87, 87, 93, 114, 128, 133, 134, 143, 155, 161, 161, ...


2

The default parameter values for mean and sd of dlnorm are 0 and 1. You have to estimate the parameters for the actual dataset. This can be done with the function fitdistr in the MASS package. library(MASS) fit <- fitdistr(data$x, "lognormal") Now, you can use the estimates for the dlnorm function: ggplot(data=data, aes(x=x)) + ...



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