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3

The problem was due to a bug in VS express 2013. By installing VS Community 2015, the error message vanished.


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The error is reported by the linker because a method (in this case the constructor) is called with a signature that does not match any of the specialisations in the class. The std::discrete_distribution documentation indicates that there are 4 specialised constructors available and these may cover the case that you require. The one that you appear ...


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http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/numeric/random/discrete_distribution/discrete_distribution You are initializing it with iterators so you need to use this constructor template< class InputIt > discrete_distribution( InputIt first, InputIt last ); So I'm guessing it should be std::discrete_distribution<int&> dist(weights.begin(), ...


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From your linked page (emphasis mine) std::piecewise_constant_distribution produces random floating-point numbers, which are uniformly distributed within each of the several subintervals [bi, bi+1), each with its own weight wi. The set of interval boundaries and the set of weights are the parameters of this distribution. It expects floating ...


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Try this piece of code and see if you get the same problem. // piecewise_constant_distribution #include <iostream> #include <array> #include <random> int main() { const int nrolls = 10000; // number of experiments const int nstars = 100; // maximum number of stars to distribute std::default_random_engine generator; ...


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For PDF proportional to some linear function, CDF will be proportional to x squared . Thus, sampling would require sqrt(), something along the lines x = xmin + sqrt(urand())*(xmax - xmin); y = ymin + sqrt(urand())*(ymax - ymin); where urand() is U(0,1) RNG (probably equal to rand()/RAND_MAX, but I've abandoned rand() and moved to C++11 long time ago) ...


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It shouldn't matter much, although being a multiple of N (or close to one) will help around the edges, especially for smaller M. The more important thing is that your random numbers are evenly distributed between 0 and M.


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The simplest approach is just to randomly select 1,000 pixels from the original 200,000 using a simple random sample. The random sample will have a statistically similar distribution to the original set. If you want to take a more sophisticated approach that is less subject to random variation and doesn't contain duplicate colors, use a Color Quantization ...


2

Let's put this data in a more friendly format: (dat <- data.frame(min=c(0, 25, 50, 60), max=c(25, 50, 60, 100), prop=c(0.15, 0.40, 0.20, 0.25))) # min max prop # 1 0 25 0.15 # 2 25 50 0.40 # 3 50 60 0.20 # 4 60 100 0.25 We can easily sample 1000 rows of the table using the sample function: set.seed(144) # For reproducibility rows <- ...


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check delta-updater it is build for binary diff and patching directories, you can use IOFilter to filter included files


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>>> import numpy as np >>> mu = 1/9 # circular mean phase >>> mu_steps = 2/9 >>> mu_end = 1 >>> kappa = np.pi/8 # circular dispersion >>> kappa_steps = np.pi/8 >>> kappa_end = np.pi/2 >>> mu, mu_steps, mu_end (0, 0, 1) >>> kappa, kappa_steps, kappa_end (0.39269908169872414, ...


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As long as your distribution is truly discrete and defined over the integers in your range (e.g. Poisson distribution), there is no problem in assigning your discreteProbabilities[] array as long as you have some kind of formula you can compute for the probabilities of each integer value in your range, and then since you are restricting to the range, you ...


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I've created a C# library for randomly selected weighted items. It implements both the tree-selection and walker alias method algorithms, to give the best performance for all use-cases. It is unit-tested and optimized. It has LINQ support. It's free and open-source, licensed under the MIT license. Some example code: IWeightedRandomizer<string> ...


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The loc parameter always shifts the x variable. In other words, it generalizes the distribution to allow shifting x=0 to x=loc. So that when loc is nonzero, maxwell.pdf(x) = sqrt(2/pi)x**2 * exp(-x**2/2), for x > 0 becomes maxwell.pdf(x, loc) = sqrt(2/pi)(x-loc)**2 * exp(-(x-loc)**2/2), for x > loc. The doc string for scipy.stats.maxwell ...


5

From the documentation, the .fit() method returns: shape, loc, scale : tuple of floats MLEs for any shape statistics, followed by those for location and scale. and the .pdf() method accepts: x : array_like quantiles arg1, arg2, arg3,... : array_like The shape parameter(s) for the distribution (see docstring of the instance object for ...


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To evaluate the pdf at abscissas, you would pass abcissas as the first argument to pdf. To specify the parameters, use the * operator to unpack the param tuple and pass those values to distr.pdf: pdf = distr.pdf(abscissas, *param) For example, import numpy as np import scipy.stats as stats distrNameList = ['beta', 'expon', 'gamma'] sample = ...


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You could use the D()function to compute F''(x) if you know F'(x). For example if F'(x) is 4*x^3 then to calculate the second derivative (F''(x)) you enter: > D(expression(4*x^3), 'x') 4 * (3 * x^2) To calculate F'''(x) you do the same thing with the given output (4 * (3 * x^2)).


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If I understand correctly, you are asking how to decide which distribution to choose once you have a few fits. There are three major metrics (IMO) for measuring "goodness-of-fit": Chi-Squared Kolmogrov-Smirnov Anderson-Darling Which to choose depends on a large number of factors; you can randomly pick one or read the Wiki pages to figure out which suits ...


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Your test variable is a three-dimensional variable, so when you do test2 = test(:,1); and then test2(:) <VaR_Calib_EVT/100 it's not the same as in your second example when you do test(:,i)<(VaR_Calib_EVT(:,i)/100) To replicate the results of your first example you could explicitly do the test2 assignment inside the loop, which should perform ...


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So, you can use this, for example: y = 0.8 + rand*0.4; this will generate random number between 0.8 and 1.2. because rand creates uniform distribution I believe that rand*0.4 creates the same ;)


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If you have the phone numbers in A1:A1000 then put this formula in B1 =RAND() and copy all the way down to row 1000 (you can do that easily by double clicking on the "fill-handle" in B1 - the black "+" you see if you put the cursor on the bottom right of the cell). Now select both columns A and B and sort by column B - that will sort your phone numbers ...


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to-report random-pert [#minval #likeval #maxval] ;use pert params to draw from a beta distribution if not (#minval <= #likeval and #likeval <= #maxval) [error "wrong argument ranking"] if (#minval = #likeval and #likeval = #maxval) [report #minval] ;;handle trivial inputs let pert-var 1. / 36 let pert-mean (#maxval + 4 * #likeval - 5 * ...


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Might use Irwin-Hall from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irwin%E2%80%93Hall_distribution Basically, min(IH(n)) = 0 max(IH(n)) = n peak(IH(n)) = n/2 Scaling to your [1.9...2.1] range v = 1.9 + ((2.1-1.9)/n) * IH(n) It is bounded, very easy to sample, and at large n it is pretty much gaussian. You could vary n to get narrow or wide peak Sampling, in some ...


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I would plot the empirical cumulative distribution function. This makes sense because the comparison of these two functions is also the basis for the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test for the significance of the difference of the two distributions. There are at least two options to plot these functions in R: ...


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You mention a logarithmic distribution, but it looks like your code is designed to generate a truncated geometric distribution instead, although it is flawed. There is more than one distribution called a logarithmic distribution and none of them are that common. Please clarify if you really do mean one of them. You compute floor[log_2 U] where U is ...


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It is known as simplex sampling, which is closely related to Dirichlet distribution. Sum(x_i) = 1, where each x_i is U(0,1). In your case after simplex sampling just multiply each x_i by 0.5. Anyway, translating c++ code from https://github.com/Iwan-Zotow/SimplexSampling into python (hopefully, not too many errors) And it handles infinity just right def ...


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What you are asking for seems to be impossible. However, I will re-interpret your question so that it makes more sense and is possible to solve. What you need is a probability distribution on the seven-dimensional hyperplane x_1 + x_2 + ... + x_8 = 0.5. Since the hyperplane is infinite in extent, a uniform distribution on the whole hyperplane will not work. ...


1

Instead of selecting 'n' numbers from a uniform distribution that sum to 'M', we can select 'n-1' random interval from a uniform distribution that range '0-M' then we can extract the intervals. from random import uniform as rand def randConstrained(n, M): splits = [0] + [rand(0, 1) for _ in range(0,n-1)] + [1] splits.sort() diffs = [x - ...


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For a fully generalized solution ("I want n numbers between low and high, that sum to m): from random import uniform as rand def randConstrained(n, m, low, high): tot = m if not low <= 0 <= high: raise ValueError("Cannot guarantee a solution when the input does not allow for 0s") answer = [] for _ in range(n-1): ...


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This demonstrates what I suggested. (Not to use poly.) library(MASS) # coeffs_current <- c(8, 4, 2) Name change for compactness. cc <- c(8, 4, 2) form <- as.formula(bquote(y~x+offset(.(cc[1])+x*.(cc[2])+.(cc[3])*I(x^2) ))) model_current <- lm(form, data=dat)) I really have no idea what you intend to do with this next code. Looks like you want ...



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