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27

A real Sun geek would chime in here about the virtues of using Solaris as a Java development platform, but I am much more ambivalent. Developing with Java is about the same on any linux distro; you are going to wind up having to install the JDK and tools of your choosing (Eclipse, Sun Studio, Tomcat, etc) so you may as well choose a distro on other criteria.....


10

Solaris :) On a serious note, there is no Linux distro dedicated to Java, so it would be about the same. OpenSolaris on the other hand (in my very humble experience) would be a bit faster, and you would have bonus of Dtrace as a tool. (Not that you can't find similar tools in Linux, but Dtrace should be somewhat more advanced).


9

If you're using Ubuntu (or a variant, like xubuntu or kubuntu), there is a package called BootUp-Manager. There's an article about it over at Lifehacker. It lets you check and uncheck things in the startup and shutdown scripts to optimize things (such as turning off checking for new hardware, or whatever) You may also be able to gain a simple speed-up by ...


7

you should first look linuxfromscratch


6

I would first ask: why did you pick "writing a kernel?" Any answer other than "the idea of implementing my own task structures in memory to be swapped by a scheduler that I write and using memory that is managed by code that I wrote and is protected by abstractions of machine-level atomic instructions and is given I/O access through abstractions that sit ...


5

The short answer is, yes you can, but you really shouldn't. Below is a list of things (in no particular order) to consider when cross-distribution installing: Dependency hell The primary reason things like yum/apt/yast exist in the first place is to avoid what is known as dependency hell. By using packages from other systems, you forfeit the work that ...


4

Been using Linode for several months, it took less than an hour to set up the the virtual "boxes", and we haven't touched it since, so from my point of view (as a developer) that gets two thumbs up. Using Ubuntu and haven't encountered any problems since initial setup. Haven't used Slicehost but frankly after the simplicity of Linode setup, wouldn't need ...


3

You could probably find a free machine orders of magnitude better than that one just by asking around.


3

I think the motive for this question is focused on the convenience of setup: Is there any distro that has Eclipse and the full Sun Java package (JRE, JDK, and DOCS) already "baked in" so that a manual install process (and deinstall of OpenJDK) is not required? Having an "out-of-the-box" standardized environment for a development team is a huge time saver. ...


3

I have used Ubuntu 8.04 and Fedora 9 with success. For Ubuntu, the community forums were very helpful and if I remember correctly one of the repositories provided apt packages for Sun's Java6 distribution. On Fedora 9, the Sun rpms work alright. In either case, alternative/galternative is your friend to make sure that you point "java" and "javac" at ...


3

I am very heavy into Java development and I personally use Ubuntu, so I agree with Sean on this one. The package manager allows you to easily install the various SDKs (the SUN one, or even the upcoming OpenJDK 7). Regards, Arjen


3

Just be careful with your distro's java installation. Most install gcj by default. For whatever reason, typing "java" into bash on most linux distros will not invoke a Sun JVM without some futzing. Usually, there needs to be a bunch of soft-linking from /usr/local/bin -> $JDK_HOME/bin/* to get things working as I typically expect them.


3

Take a look at the rather slim linux distributions specialized in embedded systems, like firewalling distros and so on. Then, if it is a graphical application you have to make sure you boot into runlevel 5 (graphics) and configure your application as login shell for the default user. You might also be interested in two services the openSUSE project ...


2

I have never heard of a Java-developer-specific Linux distro. If you need a Linux distro for work purposes (not for personal home use) then the choice of distro is not really affected by the fact that you need to install a JDK, but other factors: how quickly can it be installed? how easy is it to maintain (updates etc)? how fully-featured is it out-of-...


2

Either SUSE or RH, both have official support. http://www.java.com/en/download/help/5000010500.xml


2

These days, I believe most Linux distros do not ship with the development system by default. But I'm pretty sure g++ v4 is the 'standard' development C++ compiler if you install the C++ development environment at all. g++ v3 is usually just available as a special install. For openSUSE 11, gcc 4.3 is the current package installed when you pick the Base ...


2

It's available on Fedora, installable via "yum" if you didn't pick "Development System" as your default install set. "yum search gcc" to get the package to install.


2

I believe Xubuntu is designed for low memory footprint/fast booting and whatnot while still having a decent amount of features. Not a Linux user but it just seems to stick out in my head.


2

Some guys got an EEE PC netbook booting in 5 seconds running a modified version of Fedora. Might be a good starting point: http://lwn.net/Articles/299483/


2

You need to rebuild the kernel without stack and heap protections including non-executable stack. You then need to compile using gcc flags to turn off the protections, one of which would be "-fno-stack-protector". Also because you will run into it soon enough you probably want to statically compile your program because it will be a bit easier to understand ...


2

I would test on a a few different distributions using different packaging systems (apt, rpm etc.) Anything else should be on a case-by-case basis. An example of a Qt application is the umbrello UML modeling tool. All a ubuntu user has to do is sudo apt-get install umbrello. Even if you don't have a package ready, a similar command could set up Qt so that ...


2

I really don't think it matters nearly as much as how comfortable you are with a Linux environment and the tools available (and knowing about the tools available, and how to use them). I have been using Unix/Linux since the early 1990s, and I still come across stuff I didn't know about. One of the major strengths of this OS is the wide range of tools ...


2

These are few pointers that come to my mind and definitely it is not complete: Your PATH should be updated in the startup scripts like ~/.bashrc, /etc/profile.d, and so on to reflect the updated directories. Configuration files tend to use /var quite often. (/var/log, /var/tmp) You'd need to modify all these location references. Basically your kernel is ...


2

you can create a folder called system and the move all the files into the /system folder. and after that create symlinks, so the system can still be used. example: su -i cd / mkdir system mv /usr /system/usr ln -s /system/usr /usr I just did it........it broke my system XD (i think it was because i moved all the files into /system , including /boot ...


1

Just a tip, but from personal experience I've found that FreeBSD works much better on low-end hardware than a modern Linux distro does.


1

If you still have DVL available, you can use the commands: $ uname -r $ gcc --version to find out for yourself. Edit: according to distrowatch.com the linux kernel is 2.6.20 and gcc is 3.4.6


1

Another option is rBuilder: http://www.rpath.com/corp/


1

Take a look at SUSE studio. It's basically a web-based engine that lets you customize your own distro or LiveCD based on SUSE.


1

If you like Ubuntu, you can create your own custom LiveCD. Many other distributions offer this as well. I know that Gentoo also supports creating a custom Live distro.



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