Hot answers tagged

9

setuptools has support for this within the extras_require argument. The format is the following: extras_require={ ':python_version=="2.7"': ["mock"], }, It will support the other comparison operators. Sadly, it is not mentioned in the documentation. While looking for answers, I found PEP-426 talking about "environment markers". With that phrase ...


5

It's not as simple as a set of options but you can see how it works. In your python source directory look for this distutils/ccompiler.py In that file each compiler has an entry like this # Map compiler types to (module_name, class_name) pairs -- ie. where to # find the code that implements an interface to this compiler. (The module # is assumed to be ...


5

Distutils and Numpy/Distutils currently do not have support for Visual Studio 2015, Visual C++ 14. Following tips drawn from the Python bug report, I was able to patch the necessary files and successfully build extension using a new install of Python 3.5 from Anaconda and Mingw64 with GCC 5.2.0 running within MSYS2 on Windows 7. I do not have Visual Studio ...


4

It turns out setuptools has a module setuptools.extension.Extension which is used in the same way as the distutils.extension.Extension module . In the end, the setup.py file looks something like : from setuptools import setup, find_packages from setuptools.extension import Extension from Cython.Build import cythonize extensions = [ ...


4

The problem with the glob answer is that it only does so much. I.e. it's not fully recursive. The problem with the copy_tree answer is that the files that are copied will be left behind on an uninstall. The proper solution is a recursive one which will let you set the package_data parameter in the setup call. I've written this small method to do this: ...


3

You are importing the build_ext module, but not specifying what the callable is in that module. What you actually want do is change what you have in your try block to this: try: from Cython.Distutils.build_ext import build_ext src = ['sselogsumexp.pyx', 'src/logsumexp.c'] except ImportError: from distutils.command.build_ext import build_ext ...


3

First of all it has to find the include file, rsmd.h. You need to add the path where this header can be found to the include_dirs parameter. The error about the missing file should disappear. Then you will additionally need to include the library you get from compiling that C code. If that's librsmd.a you would add 'rsmd' to the libraries parameter. ...


3

Unfortunately Python packaging doesn't work like that. You could probably bend it to work like that but that would be quite an effort for a person without experience in Python packaging and even for experienced persons the amount/output tradeoff would not make sense. You do not mention any motive to do this besides your personal preference. Instead, to have ...


3

The -egg.info folder isn't always a temporary artifact you can delete. For example, if you use pip install -e YOURPACKAGE for an "editable" install (works via symlink like python setup.py develop so you don't have to re-install a package every time it changes), the -egg.info folder is required at runtime when your package is imported in another source. If ...


3

It is perfectly acceptable to use setuptools; the vast majority of packages on PyPI already do. If you want to re-invent the find_packages() wheel, then yes, look for directories with __init__.py files in them. This is what the setuptools.PackageFinder class does. A simplified re-implementation would be: import os from distutils.util import convert_path ...


2

Even though configuration file solves this problem, it's not always an option. I had the same issue for my command line installation process and I was not able to change config files on all the machines and python distributions. This is my solution: For mingw32 and packages, which use VC++ as default: pip install --global-option build_ext --global-option -...


2

Perhaps you are an unseasoned programmer like me that still struggled after reading all the answers above. Thus, you might find another example potentially helpful (and to address the comments in previous answers about entering the command line arguments): class RunClientCommand(Command): """ A command class to runs the client GUI. """ ...


2

Yes, it's 2015 and the documentation for adding commands and options in both setuptools and distutils is still largely missing. After a few frustrating hours I figured out the following code for adding a custom option to the install command of setup.py: from setuptools.command.install import install class InstallCommand(install): user_options = ...


2

Found another workaround which enables you to still use a virtualenv when freezing. The workaround is to exclude distutils and add the package from the original interpreter (not from the virtualenv) manually. # contents of setup.py from cx_Freeze import setup, Executable import distutils import opcode import os # opcode is not a virtualenv module, so we ...


2

I've had so much trouble with setuptools it's not even funny anymore. Here's how I ended up having to use a workaround in order to produce a working source distribution with header files: I used package_data. I'm sharing this in order to potentially save someone else the aggravation. If you know a better working solution, let me know. See here for details: ...


2

While the accepted answer was originally correct Python Wheels now provide a means to install C extension packages such as PyQt5 without the need for compilation from source. PyPi currently has .whl files for PyQt5 on Python3 for multiple platforms, including MacOS X, Linux (any), Win32 and Win64. For example, this is the output when pip-installing PyQt5 on ...


2

I encountered similar problems with my own code some time ago. If I understand the comments correctly you already used the approach that worked for me, so this is just meant as clarification and summary for all those that struggle with f2py and dependencies: f2py seems to have problems resolving dependecies on external source files. If the external ...


2

Another, possibly simpler way to do it, using gitpython, as in dd/setup.py: def git_version(version): try: import git repo = git.Repo('.git') except ImportError: print('gitpython not found: Assume release.') return '' try: repo.git.status() except git.GitCommandNotFound: print('git not found: ...


2

Specifying explicitly the include path and BLAS/LAPACK libraries for your installation is going to lead to a very platform dependent and difficult to maintain module. What you should do instead, is to use scipy to get the pointer to the LAPACK functions you need, as explained in this post (see in particular the gist in the first link). This way, if Scipy ...


2

There's quite a bit going on behind the scenes when you compile Python modules using distutils. You're getting closer with each try in your question, however the problem you've now encountered is that you're using Linux header files with a Windows (cross) compiler. (sys/select.h isn't supported with mingw32, cygwin might be a different story though). In ...


2

Maybe what you need is the setup_requires parameter: Building and Distributing Packages with Setuptools


2

If you don't have any problem with getting your setup.py code dirty use distutils.dir_util.copy_tree. The whole problem is how to exclude files from it. Heres some the code: import os.path from distutils import dir_util from distutils import sysconfig from distutils.core import setup __packagename__ = 'x' setup( name = __packagename__, packages = [...


2

I am probably oversimplifying, but at the top of your setup.py couldn't you just do something like: import platform distname,version,id = platform.linux_distribution() if not distname: raise Exception('Aborting installation: Requires Linux')


2

As you mentioned in your question, conda env is capable of maintaining separate Python environments for development versions of whichever packages you want to work on. I'm not quite sure why you are finding that python setup.py develop is installing the dev version of matplotlib to your root environment. Perhaps you created a new environment, but didn't ...


2

The .desktop file isn't supposed to be installed using Distutils. Distutils is only concerned with installing Python packages. To install .desktop files, icons and other files incidental to distribution level packaging, you should look at build automation systems, such as CMake. The first step in this process is to get CMake to build a Python project. You ...


2

Based on your description, I would suggest that you have your project built using stock autotools-generated configure and Makefile, i.e. autoconf and automake, and have either your configure or your Makefile take care of executing your setup.py, in order to set up your Python bits. I have a project that's mostly C/C++ code, together with a Perl module. This ...


2

CC=icc is not enough to build with icc. You should also link with icc (http://stackoverflow.com/a/10891764/196561; icc will add its internal libraries to ELF file), so find name of linker variable for your setup.py, probably LD and set it to icc too LD=icc (default is probably gcc). Actually it is LINKCC - https://github.com/cython/cython/blob/...


2

The command-line help for the Distutils sdist command has the answer: $ python3 ./setup.py sdist --help […] Options for 'sdist' command: --template (-t) name of manifest template file [default: MANIFEST.in] […] So you can name your “manifest template” file any name you like, and then specify the template filename with the template option for ...


2

I ran into this problem with the latest version of Cx_freeze. I found that I needed to change my Executable call in the setup.py to use a relative path for the dist directory. Changes needed in setup.py From MyExe_Target_1 = Executable( # what to build script = "main.py", initScript = None, base = None, targetDir = r"dist", ...


1

Looking for INSTALL_SHARED in the Makefile for python in: https://github.com/python/cpython/blob/3.5/Makefile.pre.in We can find: $(INSTALL_SHARED) libpython$(VERSION)$(SO) $(DESTDIR)$(LIBDIR)/$(INSTSONAME); \ So we can see there is no single variable with the asked information. You need to build it from two others: import sys from distutils import ...



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