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From the little information I gathered from the question You can perform a Find and Replace Hit CtrlH to bring up the Find and Replace screen Updated: Step 1: Select the range that you will work with. Step 2: Press the F5 key to open the Go To dialog box. Step 3: Click the Special button, and it opens the Go to Special dialog box. Step 4: In the ...


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I suggest that warning is shown because of rpol type is not masked array. Look through my console output: >>> import numpy as np, numpy.ma as ma >>> >>> x = ma.array([1., -1., 3., 4., 5., 6.]) >>> y = ma.array([1., 2., 0., 4., 5., 6.]) >>> print x/y [1.0 -0.5 -- 1.0 1.0 1.0] >>> # assign to "a" general ...


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You don't show the grouping criteria but it's obvious at least one of the groups has one of the dates set to NULL over the entire group. First, you don't have to put all that logic in a sum function. The count function does that, counting all the not null values, ignoring the null values. Where that doesn't work is where you're checking both dates, but that ...


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Try using a max/maxium statement depending on what provider you are using. / MAX(SUM((CASE WHEN EML_DateViewed IS NOT NULL OR EML_DateClicked IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)), 1) This will use your sum if it has a value, if it is zero the division will use 1 instead.


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As the random.random returns values [0.0, 1.0) as pointed out by Kevin Christopher Henry, it is easy to transfrom that into (0.0, 1.0] without any conditional code by: 1.0 - random.random()


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So, if we have a function that takes a range of [x, y), but we want it to take a range of (x, y), then the C++ function std::nextafter would solve this problem. Sadly, a similar function isn't offered in stock python. We can find it in numpy though. random.uniform(numpy.nextafter(0, 1), 1) You could also hardcode the number if you didn't want a ...


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If you don't mind writing your own function, here's a go: def rand(): x = 0 while x == 0: x = random.random() return x This keeps picking a random float until that random float is not equal to 0, upon which it is returned: >>> def rand(): ... x = 0 ... while x == 0: ... x = random.random() ... ...


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One approach would be to transform it from [0.0, 1.0) to (0.0, 1.0]: def nonzero_random(): return random.random() or 1.0


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Try: random.randrange(start, stop, step) even if you are forced to have a range of integers, you can always divide the results. >>> random.randrange(1, 1000)/ float(1000) 0.428


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Well this may be look like a little bit strange solution but, you can test your function with a random numbers and check the result, if result is always 1 then it means it's a division operation: static bool IsDivision(Func<int, int, float> func) { var rnd = new Random(); return Enumerable.Range(0, 10) .Select(x => ...


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What about usual flow control? An if statement? float[,] c; if (b != 0) c = Calculate(a, b, (x,y) => (x/y)); else c = 0;



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