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89

Here is my approach, I create a mixin that is protected (this is kept in my mixin library): from django.contrib.auth.decorators import login_required from django.utils.decorators import method_decorator class LoginRequiredMixin(object): @method_decorator(login_required) def dispatch(self, request, *args, **kwargs): return ...


81

See https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/class-based-views/intro/#decorating-class-based-views You can add the decorator in urls.py, e.g., login_required(ViewSpaceIndex.as_view(..)) or decorate the dispatch method with method_decorator e.g., from django.utils.decorators import method_decorator @method_decorator(login_required) def ...


41

Key points is: generated FormSets within forms.py using inlineformset_factory: BookImageFormSet = inlineformset_factory(BookForm, BookImage, extra=2) BookPageFormSet = inlineformset_factory(BookForm, BookPage, extra=5) returned the FormSets within a CreateView class in views.py: def get_context_data(self, **kwargs): context = super(BookCreateView, ...


36

You can subclass a class and refine methods like get_context_data for specific cases, and leave the rest as-is. You can't do that with functions. For instance, you might need to create a new view that does everything a previous one does, but you need to include extra variable in the context. Subclass the original view and override the get_context_data ...


34

simplejson and json don't work with django objects well. Django's built-in serializers can only serialize querysets filled with django objects: data = serializers.serialize('json', self.get_queryset()) return HttpResponse(data, mimetype="application/json") In your case, self.get_queryset() contains a mix of django objects and dicts inside. One option is ...


33

Have you tried passing in success_url? e.g. CreateView.as_view(model=myModel, success_url="/success/") or if you want to redirect to a named view: CreateView.as_view(model=myModel, success_url=reverse('success-url'))


33

Here's an alternative using class based decorators: from django.utils.decorators import method_decorator def class_view_decorator(function_decorator): """Convert a function based decorator into a class based decorator usable on class based Views. Can't subclass the `View` as it breaks inheritance (super in particular), so we monkey-patch ...


29

Here's a simple one: from django.views.generic import DeleteView from django.http import Http404 class MyDeleteView(DeleteView): def get_object(self, queryset=None): """ Hook to ensure object is owned by request.user. """ obj = super(MyDeleteView, self).get_object() if not obj.owner == self.request.user: raise ...


29

I've basically sub-classed some of the Generic Class-Based-Views to do exactly that. The main difference is I just filtered out the querysets. I can't vouch for whether this method is any better or worse but it made more sense to me. Feel free to ignore the "MessageMixin" -- that's just there to easily present Messages using the Django Messaging Framework ...


27

I can't test it, but I bet you need return context at the end of get_context_data :)


24

You should define a get_initial method which returns a dictionary that contains the initial values: class IncidentUpdateView(UpdateView): def get_initial(self): return { 'value1': 'foo', 'value2': 'bar' } Alternatively, you can define an initial value: class IncidentUpdateView(UpdateView): initial = { 'value1': 'foo', 'value2': 'bar' }


22

According to the source of django.views.generic.base.View.as_view: on django startup, as_view() returns a function view, which is not called on request, view() is called, it instantiates the class and calls dispatch() the class instance is thread safe According to the source of django.views.generic.base.View.__init__, the request object is out of scope ...


21

To access the url parameters in class based views, use self.args or self.kwargs so you would access it by doing self.kwargs['year']


20

I suspect class UserForm should be model form. You may want to change fields, but it should be derived from `ModelForm. So change form definition to class UserForm(forms.ModelForm): class Meta: model = User fields = [...] # list of fields you want from model #or define fields that you want. ....


19

Create a class MyUpdateView inheritted from UpdateView and override get_success_url method: class MyUpdateView(UpdateView): def get_success_url(self): pass #return the appropriate success url Also i like to pass such parameters like template_name and model inside of inheritted class view, but not in .as_view() in urls.py


17

The MRO is basically depth-first, left-to-right. See Method Resolution Order (MRO) in new style Python classes for some more info. You can look at the __mro__ attribute of the class to check, but FooMixin should be first if you want to do "check A" first. class UltimateBase(object): def dispatch(self, *args, **kwargs): print 'base dispatch' ...


17

I think your goal is trying to filter queryset based on form submission, if so, by using GET : class ProfileSearchView(ListView) template_name = '/your/template.html' model = Person def get_queryset(self): try: name = self.kwargs['name'] except: name = '' if (name != ''): object_list ...


17

I need to override the get_object() method on the update view and do not need to override form_valid. The custom get_object() method is: def get_object(self, queryset=None): return self.request.user


15

If self.args[0] is bothering you, the alternative is: urlpatterns = patterns('books.views', url(r'^books/(?P<slug>\w+)/$', 'publisher_books_list', name="publisher_books_list"), ) Then you could use self.kwargs['slug'] instead, making it slightly more readable.


15

In any of the class methods you can access the request using self.request. So your user profile will be accessible with self.request.user. Building on the link you provided you will be able to use self.request.user in your get_initial method to set the value. ie. def get_initial(self): return { 'value1': self.request.user }


15

Yes, here are three excellent screencasts by GoDjango: Part 1 Part 2 Part 3


14

Instead of ShowAppsView.as_view()(self.request) I had to do this return ShowAppsView.as_view()(self.request)


14

According to the caching docs docs, the correct way to cache a CBV is url(r'^my_url/?$', cache_page(60*60)(MyView.as_view())), Note that the answer you linked to is out of date. The old way of using the decorator has been removed (changeset).


14

There's also the option of an authentication mixin, which you would derive your view class from. So using this mixin from brack3t.com: class LoginRequiredMixin(object): @method_decorator(login_required) def dispatch(self, *args, **kwargs): return super(LoginRequiredMixin, self).dispatch(*args, **kwargs) you could then create new ...


13

I realise this thread is a bit dated, but here's my two cents anyway. with the following code: from django.utils.decorators import method_decorator from inspect import isfunction class _cbv_decorate(object): def __init__(self, dec): self.dec = method_decorator(dec) def __call__(self, obj): obj.dispatch = self.dec(obj.dispatch) ...


13

No. It is just that django gives you the option to name your views in case you need to refer to them from your code, or your templates. This is useful and good practice because you avoid hardcoding urls on your code or inside your templates. Even if you change the actual url, you don't have to change anything else, since you will refer to them by name. e.x ...


13

How about overriding form_valid which does the form saving? Save it yourself, do whatever you want to it, then do the redirect. class PlaceFormView(CreateView): form_class = PlaceForm @method_decorator(login_required) def dispatch(self, *args, **kwargs): return super(PlaceFormView, self).dispatch(*args, **kwargs) def ...


13

All you have to do, is to pop user from kwargs in PlaceEventForm.init() method, so it doesn't get into the ModelForm.init() method: views.py: class PlaceEventFormView(CreateView): form_class = PlaceEventForm template_name = 'events/event_create.html' @method_decorator(login_required) def dispatch(self, *args, **kwargs): return ...


12

Specify a queryset instead of model: class PostDetailView(DetailView): queryset = Post.objects.select_related() (According to the docs, specifying model = Foo is the same as specifying queryset = Foo.objects.all(), although I'm not sure that's exactly right -- I think specifying model uses the default manager instead, which might not be objects.)


12

If you do not provide "context_object_name", your view may look like this: <ul> {% for publisher in object_list %} <li>{{ publisher.name }}</li> {% endfor %} </ul> But if you provide like {"context_object_name": "publisher_list"}, then you can write view like: <ul> {% for publisher in publisher_list %} ...



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