Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

three cheers for @traviscline's suggestion to go with pymysql. his suggestion was based on this post from mozilla. all it takes is a simple patch to your manage.py file #!/usr/bin/env python +try: + import pymysql + pymysql.install_as_MySQLdb() +except ImportError: + pass changing the import in your settings file, and monkeypatch() since ...


18

This is not really django specific; more to do with databases. You add indexes on columns when you want to speed up searches on that column. Typically, only the primary key is indexed by the database. This means look ups using the primary key are optimized. If you do a lot of lookups on a secondary column, consider adding an index to that column to speed ...


16

I would use the relativedelta function of the dateutil.relativedelta package, which will give you are more accurate 'n-years ago' calculation: from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta import datetime years_ago = datetime.datetime.now() - relativedelta(years=5) Then simply update the date field as others have shown here.


14

Pre 1.0, django ORM underwent a major queryset re-factor. One of the reasons for this was "This re-factor enables us to support non relational backends". The official support I think is definitely on the cards; but I think there were more pressing matters for 1.1 and 1.2(now in beta). However, there are of course several independent efforts to use non ...


14

To update a subset of fields, the correct syntax is: survey.save(update_fields=["active"]) Note that this is a new feature in Django 1.5. In earlier versions, you could use the update method instead: Survey.objects.filter(pk=survey.pk).update(active=True)


13

I will open with "You should not edit settings at runtime". Having said that, I have exactly this same issue, where I want to create a unique database for each user. The reason for doing this is I am offering the ability for the user to save/access to/from a database not stored on my server, which entails having multiple databases, and thus one for each ...


12

The django.db.connections is a simple wrapper around DATABASES defined in your settings. The wrapper class is here: https://github.com/django/django/blob/master/django/db/utils.py#L55-L105 from django.db import connections # Add connection information dynamically.. connections.databases['new-alias'] = { ... } # Ensure the remaining default connection ...


10

Andrew Godwin provided an answer: Yes, use: ./manage.py syncdb --all then: ./manage.py migrate --fake This will, however, also ignore any migrations that add in data to the database.


8

As far as I know you can't specify the database directly with the model since it would kind of prevent the app from ever being reusable, but from what I can see in the docs that's what database routers are there for.


8

You will want to look into South. It provides a migrations system to migrate both schema changes as well as data from one version to the next. It's quite powerful and the vast majority of changes can be handled simple by going manage.py schemamigration --auto manage.py migrate The auto functionality does have it limits, and especially if the change is ...


7

ForeignKey is implemented as IntegerField in the database, so you save little to nothing at the cost of crippling your model. Edit: And for pete's sake, keep it in one table and use indexes as appropriate.


6

Like many have said, it's a bit premature to split your table up into smaller tables (horizontal partitioning or even sharding). Databases are made to handle tables of this size, so your performance problem is probably somewhere else. Indexes are the first step, it sounds like you've done this though. 4 million rows should be ok for the db to handle with ...


6

Database migration is a goal for the django project, but it was a difficult enough topic that it didn't end up in the first several versions. A number of migration projects emerged to fill in the gap, and each one solves the difficult problem in different ways. Rather than trying to create an additional migration solution, or blessing one with 'official' ...


6

I have figured out what the problem is, as I said I had dumped the legacy database into my new django project. The older tables were created using phpMyAdmin and the storage engine type for the table was of MyISAM however the new tables created my django had a storage type of innodb. As a result there was an incompatibility between the two tables and ...


6

This message is from the browser; and it will display anytime you try to refresh a page that was displayed as the result of a POST request. It has no bearing on your code, the browser will display the same message on all websites where you try to refresh the page (hit F5 for example) which was displayed as a result of a previous POST request. To prevent ...


6

You could do it like this: Statusmessages.objects.filter(pk__in=Statusmessages.objects.filter(time__lt=date).values_list('pk')[:30000]).delete()


6

Add your database file to .gitignore. Then you can keep it in its current location, but it will not be under version control.


5

Straight forward OOP, you should just create a Model (object) for each artifact - for example: class ChatComment(models.Model): owner = models.ForeignKey(User) when = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add=True) message = models.CharField(...) ... chatroom = models.ForeignKey(ChatRoom) class PublicDocument(models.Model): owner = ...


5

Those tables are generated by a manage.py inspectdb right? Then you don't need to include django's own models into the actual generated models. Just remove any model starting with auth, django, admin and site. Just include the corresponding contrib apps to the INSTALLED_APPS setting and voila, no more errors.


4

dragoon is on the right track, but your comment makes a valid point. A better pattern is like this: if a_id: a = AList.objects.get(id=a_id) else: a = AList() if request.POST: form = AForm(request.POST, instance=a) ... else: form = AForm(instance=a)


4

I think the answer is there's no easy way. Django supports relational databases, but DynamoDB is NoSQL. There doesn't appear to be a backend for django-nonrel, an unofficial fork for non relational databases. If you want to use amazon to host the database, you could use their RDS service and configure Django as you would for MySQL.


4

To find the code executing queries, you can install django-debug-toolbar to figure out what commands are being executed and which tables they're operating on. Once you've done that, try hooking into the appropriate Django signals for those models and using print and assert to narrow the code. I'm sure there's a better way to do some of this (a python ...


4

Use timedelta. Something like this should do the trick: import datetime years = 100 days_per_year = 365.24 hundred_years_later = my_object.date + datetime.timedelta(days=(years*days_per_year))


4

Django formsets just delegate all the details of form creation to the form objects themselves, and the individual form instances aren't aware of the others, so it isn't unexpected that each will have to query for its own choices. Caching could also have unintended side effects--for example, the form's __init__ function could be dependent on the initial ...


4

You need select_related or prefetch_related


4

You can register database in DATABASES settings. from your_project import settings database_id = "unqique_name" new_database = {} new_database["id"] = database_id new_database['ENGINE'] = 'django.db.backends.sqlite3' new_database['NAME'] = '/project/data/db_%s.sql' % database_id new_database['USER'] = '' new_database['PASSWORD'] = '' new_database['HOST'] = ...


4

select_for_update isn't fragile. I wrote that "if you were relying on "automatic transactions"" then you need to review your code when you upgrade from 1.5 from 1.6. If you weren't relying on "automatic transaction", and even more if the concept doesn't ring a bell, then you don't need to do anything. As pointed out in yuvi's answer (which is very good, ...


3

I met the same issue after some complex South migration. We wanted to avoid to reload the database (dump/import), luckily it will help other peoples who fall on this post after searching for the same issue. We found a solution which solve this problem without the need of exporting and importing the database. For a table named auth_user, the following MySQL ...


3

c = p.choice_set.filter(id=3) won't return a single choice object. It returns a queryset composed of a single choice object because, obviously, there is just one object with the same id. Querysets are iterables, which means that if you want to obtain the choice object from that variable it should be: c = p.choice_set.filter(id=3)[0] That is the difference ...


3

Try this code: Message_me = Messages.objects.filter(username='myname', status=0).count()



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible