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9

it's possible using django-orm: here's what you should do: from django.db.models import Sum total = Task.objects.filter(your-filter-here).aggregate(total=Sum('progress', field="progress*estimated_days"))['total'] Note: if two fields are of different types, say integer & float, the type you want return should be passed as the first parameter of Sum ...


5

Actually, you have already accomplished it (Almost): committee_relations = CommitteeRole.objects.filter(user=request.user).values_list('committee__pk', flat=True) item_list = Item.objects.filter(committees__in=committee_relations) And, if you are looking for a single query, you can try this: items = ...


4

as per discussion on IRC with op, could be qs = qs.exclude( Q ( shared = True ) && ~ Q ( number__in=[1,6,7] ) )


4

Here's one way to do it: Teacher.objects.filter(user__id=some_id).values_list('substitute_id', flat=True) The key is that foreign key relationships can be reversed -- you can make Teacher queries that are predicated on User.


4

The accepted answer is not entirely true. For many cases, you can override get() in the model manager to pop dynamic properties from the keyword arguments, then add the actual attributes you want to query against into the kwargs keyword arguments dictionary. Be sure to return a super so any regular get() calls return the expected result. I'm only pasting ...


4

This is database backend specific. In settins you can uses DATABASES' OPTIONS to specify parameters for database backend. The exact name of the option you need depends on the database. For example for sqlite you would use 'timeout', but for MySQL and PostgreSQL 'connect_timeout': DATABASES = { 'default': { 'ENGINE': ...


4

I believe this is what you're looking for: from django.db.models import Max, F Election.objects.filter(club__members=me) \ .annotate(max_date=Max('club__election_set__when')) \ .filter(when=F('max_date')).select_related('elected') Relations can be followed forwards and backwards again in a single statement, allowing you to ...


3

child_set is the default related_name of your parent field in the Child model. If you've specified a different one, you will have to change the code accordingly. from django.db.models import Count ordered_parents = Parent.objects.annotate(num_children=Count('child_set')).order_by('-num_childen') Hope it helps.


3

Different order should return equal result in your example. Nevertheless I tested your code (using corrections I made in the question's codes) but can't generate the error you describe. Maybe you had introduced other errors and missed when simplified the code, could you post the sample data you used? (see my data below). First your sample code is buggy I ...


3

Compare year, month, day: d = user.created my_objects = MyClass.objects.exclude( created__year=d.year, created__month=d.month, created__day=d.day ) or compare with the date (inclusive) and the next day (exclusive) d = user.created.date() my_objects = MyClass.objects.exclude( created__gte=d, created__lt=d + datetime.timedelta(days=1) ) ...


3

What you want is defined here in SQL term: query the Election table, group them by Club and keep only the last election of each club. Now, how can we translate that in Django ORM? Looking at the documentation, we learn that we can do it with an annotation. The trick is that you need to think in reverse. You want to annotate (add a new data) each club with ...


3

If the 3 models are similar in some way (as they appear to be), the way I would probably do it is by creating a base model and then have the 3 other models inherit from that model. class Publishable(models.Model): is_published = models.BooleanField(default=False) publication_date = models.DatetimeField() ... other fields ... class ...


3

gen_certi variable is a queryset (list of objects), because you are using filter() - use get() instead: gen_certi = Certificate.objects.get(pk = kwargs.get('cert_id')).generic_certificate Actually, I don't understand what are you planning to do in the view. If you are modifying the object, there is no need to overwrite the existing fields, just update the ...


3

Your problem is about your Django Query Streets.objects.filter(streettimings_isnull=True).filter(streettimings_lookuptiming__isnull=True).values('id') streettimings_isnull=True will return Streets which do not have a StreetTiming relation. So, using streettimings_lookuptiming__isnull=True is meaningless since filtered Street objects do not have a related ...


2

You can use something like this: Substitute.objects.filter(teacher__user=user.pk)


2

I want to get all Entry histories for a specific customer. customer = Customer.objects.get(pk=1) EntryHistory.objects.filter(entry__customer=customer) Django provides both forward and reverse lookups for foreign keys, so exploiting that you can go from EntryHistory -> Entry -> Customer


2

The code flow can look like this: kwargs = {} if first_name != '': kwargs.update({'first_name': "Foo"}) if middle_name != '': kwargs.update({'middle_name': "Bar"}) etc... MyModel.objects.filter(**kwargs)


2

This should execute just one SQL query: companies_with_more_than_1_user = ( Company.objects .annotate(num_users=Count('userprofile')) .filter(num_users__gt=1) ) users = User.objects.filter(userprofile__company__in=companies_with_more_than_1_user) Stuff like this is a reason to like the Django ORM, even though I'm generally ambivalent ...


2

If you happen to be using PostGreSQL, you can use Django's interface to DISTINCT ON: recent_cakes = Cake.objects.order_by('bakery__id', '-baked_at').distinct('bakery__id') As the docs say, you must order by the same fields that you distinct on.


2

You need to use Q objects: from django.db.models import Q Model.objects.filter( Q(f1__contains=query) | Q(f2__contains=query) | Q(f3__contains=query) ) If you are using MySQL, consider using search instead - it is a lot faster than contains because it uses full text indexing.


2

You can do this with extra. Query for postgres: # || is string concatenation in postgres # query = "Betty B" queryset_list = Person.objects.extra( where=['first_name || ' ' || last_name ilike %s'] params=['%%%s%%' % query] ) Result query will be similar to: SELECT * FROM appname_person WHERE first_name ||' '|| last_name ilike 'Betty B'; For ...


2

Your data is most likely stored as text rather than a number. You can use ... ORDER BY CAST(the_column AS UNSIGNED) if you want to force the right order. But a better solution is most likely to just convert the type of the column itself.


2

You might want to look into Django-MPTT : http://django-mptt.github.io/django-mptt/overview.html especially the model methods it has : http://django-mptt.github.io/django-mptt/models.html#mpttmodel-instance-methods It offers everything you would be needing in order to manipulate such relationship, I've used it in a few projects involving models similar to ...


2

In Postgresql you could try creating a case insensitive index as described here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4124225/110274 Then run a query: from django.db.models import Q name_filter = Q() for name in names: name_filter |= Q(name__iexact=name) result = Name.objects.filter(name_filter) Index search will run faster than the regex matching query.


2

Probably you should just add the __in lookup modifier: tbl_nt_123.objects.values_list('id','address').exclude( condition_id__in=tbl_conditions.objects.filter(version_id=5).values_list('condition_id',flat=True)) As for the union, you can fake it using the | operator. union = queryset1 | queryset2


2

Use __gt in a double underscore notation: new_items = MyObject.objects.filter(updated_date__gt=given_date) Relevant threads: Django database query: How to filter objects by date range? Django query datetime for objects older than 5 hours Using datetime to compare with dates in Django


2

try this name = "pictures/image.jpg" image = Image.objects.get(image=name) or image = Image.objects.get(image="pictures/image.jpg")


1

I cannot answer your question directly, but there may be another way of doing what you want to do which may yield more consistent results: subset_a = D.objects.filter(one_attr=False, d_to_p__the_last_attr=10) subset_b = D.objects.filter(one_attr=True, s_attr__p__the_last_attr=5) union_set = subset_a | subset_b union_set = union_set.distinct() The | ...


1

~Q That will let me do a not-query and then I can filter that by shared=True: qs = qs.exclude(~Q(number__in=[1, 6, 7]), shared=True)


1

You can query it directly in the template like this: <table> {% for ds in data_streams %} <tr> <td> {% ds.category %} </td> <td> {% for subcat in ds.datastreamsubsategory_set.all %} {{subcat.sub_category}} {% endfor %} </td> <td> ...



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