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4

You should reverse the foreign key relationship: class HeartRate(models.Model): timestamp = models.DateTimeField('Date and time recorded') heartrate = models.PositiveIntegerField(default=0) exercise = models.ForeignKey(Exercise, related_name='heartrates') class Exercise(models.Model): start_timestamp = models.DateTimeField('Starting ...


4

You're very close: Change: [i.dealership for i in q.dealership.all] to: [dealership for dealership in q.dealership.all()] Here's sample output from one of my model's M2M relationships on a project which demonstrates what you should see from the list comprehension. shared_with is an M2M field to a model called Profile: >>> from polls.models ...


3

from datetime import date def add_years(d, years): try: return d.replace(year = d.year + years) except ValueError: return d + (date(d.year + years, 1, 1) - date(d.year, 1, 1)) today = datetime.date.today() ago18 = add_years(today, -18) ago25 = add_years(today, -25) # < 18 User.objects.filter(profile__birthdate__gt=ago18) # 18 ...


2

Without knowing how your models look like, I'd use the following query: Query with AND: Product.objects.filter(categories__price__isnull=False, categories__color='blue') Query with OR: from django.db.models import Q Product.objects.filter(Q(categories__price__isnull=False) | Q(categories__color='blue'))


2

In a LEFT JOIN, every field of modela could be NULL because of the absence of corresponding row. So modela.deleted_at IS NULL ...is not only true for the matching rows, but also true for those users whose have no corresponding modela rows. I think the right SQL should be: SELECT COUNT( CASE WHEN `modela`.`user_id` IS NOT NULL -- Make ...


2

Many solutions implement sql OFFSET and LIMIT via slicing the queryset. As stefano notes, with larger datasets this becomes very inefficient. The proper way of handling this is to use server-side cursers to keep track of the OFFSET. Native server-side cursor support is in the works for django. Until it's ready, here is a simple implementation if you are ...


2

Field lookups to use SQL WHERE clause to get foreign table Parent 's feild. Organisation.objects.values_list('first_parent__parent_name', flat=True).distinct()


2

You can use custom managers to keep things DRY and enhance readability (an explicitly named filter is always better than dragging a complex filter) class GraduateManager(models.Manager): def get_queryset(self): return super(GraduateManager, self).get_queryset().filter(graduated=True) class UndergraduateManager(models.Manager): def ...


1

This is not exactly a QuerySet problem. This needs a separate algo that decides the ordering of the result set that you create. I would write a new algo that decides the ordering - possibly a whole array of algos because your results would depend on the category of the query itself. For now I can think of adding weight to the every result in the result ...


1

You can try to do it like here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/2176471/4971083 It's the solution for ordering your records by specific value in Django. You could order your records by distributor_name = 'FirstDistributor' p= Product.objects.filter(product__id=product_id).extra( select={'is_top': " distributor__name='FirstDistributor'"}) p = p.extra(order_by ...


1

Just use a generic list view, this will make your life a lot easier and save some time. class ListView(generic.ListView) model=Actividad template_name='todas.html' and then in your template you can display the list like so {% for i in object_list %} {{ i.titulo }} {% endfor %}


1

It is mostly better to go for smaller number of database hits because that may as well be your bottleneck when performance is critical. Having more hits is almost like hitting the hard disk for a file every time you want to read a line. Of course the final answer depends on the frequency of your usage and the actual gains you derive by putting the queries ...


1

bruno's answer works, but it feels dirty to me - both on the Python level and on the SQL level (a large concatenation of ORs). In MySQL at least, you can use the following SQL syntax: SELECT id FROM table WHERE (first_name, last_name) IN (('John','Doe'),('Jane','Smith'),('Bill','Clinton')) Django's ORM doesn't provide a direct way to do this, so I ...


1

You can reload each object in the start of the loop body. Just use TheModel.objects.get(pk=curr_instance.pk) to do this.


1

Given that the queryset is not too big to be sorted as a list, you can do the following: shuffled = sorted(qs, key=lambda item: item.order if item.order != 999 else 999 + random.random())


1

Didn't you try to do like this? Order.objects.filter(orderstatus__status=OrderStatus.ORDERED) .filter(orderstatus__status=OrderStatus.IN_TRANSIT) .filter(orderstatus__status=OrderStatus.RECEIVED) .order_by('orderstatus__time') On my models it worked as expected - order_by picked the last joined orderstatus just as ...


1

Event.objects.order_by('start').filter(start__year=year, start__month=month) Returns a list of matching Event objects. You then pass this QuerySet list to: group_by_day(self, event) Which from your parameter names suggests you think you are passing a single event. So it doesn't work.


1

I figured it out with a bit of tinkering: qs = self.MyField.all() q = Q() for combination in my_tuples: q = q | Q(Q(language=combination['language']) & Q(country=combination['country'])) return qs.filter(q)


1

i think you need to set related_name: class A(models.Model): att1= models.ForeignKey(B, related_name='A_model') att2 = models.CharField(max_length=128) class B(models.Model): ident = models.CharField(max_length=128) query like this: B.objects.filter(A_model__att2="test") this is my first Answer in stackoverflow hope this will help you if ...


1

class AddPickupItemForm(ModelForm): def __init__(self,*args,**kwargs) the_user = kwargs.pop('user',None) super(AddPickupItemForm, self).__init__(*args,**kwargs) if the_user is not None: self.fields['dropoffitem'].queryset = DropOffItem.objects.filter(user=the_user) In other words, pass your user to the form when ...


1

It should be: q.dealership.all() #gives a list of objects You can directly do this instead of using list comprehension(in the above ans). Example: (Taken from docs) from django.db import models class Publication(models.Model): title = models.CharField(max_length=30) def __str__(self): # __unicode__ on Python 2 return ...


1

The correct query does not include the _set part: Group.objects.filter(translatedfoo__language_code='x', translatedfoo__country='y') Search for "reverse" on this doc page for more details.



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