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19

You should use aggregates. from django.db.models import Count User.objects.annotate(page_count=Count('page')).filter(page_count__gte=2).count()


19

Starting from Django 1.4 prefetch_related does what you want. Parent.objects.prefetch_related('child_set') Related(!) django docs : https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/querysets/#prefetch-related.


18

I'm afraid I really can't understand what your question is. A couple of corrections: select_related has nothing to do with ordering (it doesn't change the queryset at all, just follows joins to get related objects and cache them); and to order by a field in a related model you use the double-underscore notation, not dotted. For example: ...


12

Sorry to once again post a link to my blog, but I have written about a technique to simulate select_related on backwards relationships.


9

Django versions 1.4 and above have prefetch_related for this purpose. The prefetch_related method is similar to select_related, but does not do a database join. Instead, it executes additional database queries and does the joining in Python.


6

In this case, I think the best thing to do is list the children, then get the parent from them, like this: children = Child.objects.filter(...).select_related('parent').order_by('parent') Then in the template, possibly use a regroup (note the order_by above): {% regroup children by parent as parents %} <ul> {% for parent in parents %} ...


5

It's a tradeoff. It takes time to send a query to the database, the database to prepare results, and then send those results back. select_related works off the principle that the most expensive part of this process is the request and response cycle, not the actual query, so it allows you to combine what would otherwise have been distinct queries into just ...


4

User.objects.order_by('last_name', 'userprofile__title')


4

Django REST Framework cannot automatically optimize queries for you, in the same way that Django itself won't. There are places you can look at for tips, including the Django documentation. It has been mentioned that Django REST Framework should automatically, though there are some challenges associated with that. This question is very specific to your ...


4

I'm not sure where your trouble is exactly. Remember that select_related() does not in any way change the object access for related instances - all it does is pre-cache them. So you refer to partassembly.part_no.rev and so on, exactly as if you were not using select_related.


4

Select_related() doesn't work with manytomanyfields. At the moment, this is something that is not planned, but might be a future feature. See http://code.djangoproject.com/ticket/6432 In this case, if you want to make a single query you got two options 1) Make your own SQL, probably won't be pretty or fast. 2) You could also query on the model with the ...


3

Using Django's double-underscore notation as shown here. FooModel.objects.all().select_related('bar').defer('bar__blah', ...)


3

Or just enable list_select_related. class MyModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): list_select_related = True # ....


3

If you're not on Django 1.4, there's also the django-batch-select library, which works basically the same way as prefetch_related.


2

With Django 1.4 you can use prefetch_related which will work for ManyToMany relations: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/querysets/#prefetch-related


2

django-tagging uses a generic foreign key to your model, so you can't just use select_related. Something like this should do the trick though: from django.contrib.contenttypes.models import ContentType from collections import defaultdict from tagging.models import TaggedItem def populate_tags_for_queryset(queryset): ctype = ...


2

def get_class_A(self, param): return A.objects.filter(b__related_c=self, b__attribute1=param).distinct() What you've described looks a lot like a ManyToMany relationship between A and C. If you declare it as such, and include your extra attributes by specifying B as a through model, Django will create the relationship between A and C for you. Also, ...


2

What you need is a recursive function that traverse OrganizationalUnit relation tree and gets number of related Checkouts for each OrganizationalUnit. So your code will look like this: def count_checkouts(ou): checkout_count = ou.checkouts.count() for kid in ou.children.all(): checkout_count += count_checkouts(kid) return checkout_count ...


2

I think the most efficient way of calculating this is at write time. You should modify OrganizationalUnit like this: class OrganizationalUnit(models.Model): name = models.CharField(max_length=100) parent = models.ForeignKey( 'self', blank=True, null=True, related_name='children', ) checkout_number = ...


2

All select_related does, is eagerly fetch the fields declared as ForeignKey within your model. It attempts to avoid extra database calls, it doesn't magically give you access to extra fields. In your example, that means that accessing partassembly.subpart will not result in an extra database select, since it was eagerly fetched with the ...


2

You could make Django use select_related by defining your own ModelAdmin like this class MyModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): def queryset(self, request): qs = super(MyModelAdmin, self).queryset(request) return qs.select_related()


2

You can traverse through all the relationships as deep as you want just through the standard Django API. select_related doesn't do anything special in setting up the relationships; it merely allows you to reduce the number of DB queries by performing joins in advance (instead of looking up each foreign key as it's accessed). However, as the docs state, ...


1

Here you have to make a choice about denormalization in your model if you think that one more database hit per row in your changelist is unacceptable. The question is how to store this ManyToMany relation ? Maybe you can go with a synced JSON serialized object in a CharField or a TextField to serialize the subset of fields you need (pk and name for ...


1

I don't like answering my own question, but the answer might help others. Here is my solution that will get related items on a queryset based entirely on Nick Johnson's solution linked above. from collections import defaultdict def get_with_related(queryset, *attrs): """ Adds related attributes to a queryset in a more efficient way than ...


1

You're just looking at the string representation of the object, which obviously uses the __unicode__ method. The fields are there, of course, if you access the objects directly.


1

The __unicode__ method is automagically being called when you refer to the object as a string. You could simply put the fields you care about in the __unicode__ method (assuming a Manufacturer model): def __unicode__(self): return u'%s -- %s -- %s -- %s -- %s' % (self.oi_order, self.oi_pos, self.oi_item, self.manufacturer.name, ...


1

With the Django ORM you don't actually write out the joins. You can help it determine the most efficient query and in this case you'd want to use prefetch_related as below. partidos_fifa_set = PartidosFifa.objects.prefetch_related('partidosusuarios_set') What this does is it will fetch all of the records PartidosUsuarios for each PartidosFifa record. To ...


1

Declare the relation like that: rubric = models.OneToOneField(Rubric, related_name='seo') Then you can access the related model via: {{ rubric.seo.title}}


1

You can use related_name in the definition of your Model. class RubricSeo(models.Model): rubric = models.OneToOneField(Rubric, related_name='seo') title = models.CharField(max_length=255) You still need to use select_related rubric = Rubric.objects.select_related('seo').get(id=rubric_id)


1

There's no need to query CandidatePhotos in the view at all. Your candidate object already had the relevant relationship, through User, so you can simply follow that: {% for photo in object.user.candidatephotos_set.all %}



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