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75

The << part is wrong, use < instead: $ ./manage.py shell < myscript.py You could also do: $ ./manage.py shell ... >>> execfile('myscript.py')


26

Late for the party :D but i hope that my response will help someone: You can do this in your python script: import sys, os sys.path.append('/path/to/your/django/app') os.environ['DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE'] = 'settings' from django.conf import settings the rest of your stuff goes here ...


21

You're not recommended to do that from the shell - and this is intended as you shouldn't really be executing random scripts from the django environment (but there are ways around this, see the other answers). If this is a script that you will be running multiple times, it's a good idea to set it up as a custom command ie $ ./manage.py my_command to do ...


12

You need to install PyReadline, documentation is here.


10

from django.core.files import File user1=User(name='abc') user1.pic.save('abc.png', File(open('/tmp/pic.png', 'r'))) You will end up with the image abc.png copied into the upload_to directory specified in the ImageField. In this case, the user1.pic.save method will also save the user1 instance. The documentation for saving an ImageField can be found here ...


9

You should not create the user via the normal User(...) syntax, add others have suggested. You should always use User.objects.create_user(), which takes care of setting the password properly.


8

Pipe it ;) echo "print 'hello world'" | python manage.py shell


8

For anyone using Django 1.7+, it seems that simply import the settings module is not enough. After some digging, I found this Stack Overflow answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/23241093 You now need to: import os, django os.environ.setdefault("DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE", "myapp.settings") django.setup() # now your code can go here... Without doing the ...


5

Not like that. But it is easy enough to write a standalone script for Django.


4

Did you import the settings first? $steve ./manage.py shell Python 2.7.1 (r271:86832, Jun 16 2011, 16:59:05) In [1]: from django.conf import settings In [2]: settings.TEMPLATE_DIRS Out [2] ('/Volumes/HDD/usr/local/django/mytestproject/templates',)


4

How I simulate requests from the python command line is: Use the excellent requests library Use the django reverse function A simple way of simulating requests is: >>> from django.core.urlresolvers import reverse >>> import requests >>> r = requests.get(reverse('app.views.your_view')) >>> r.text (prints output) ...


4

For the times that a list comprehension just won't do for x in (1,2,3,4):print x;exec("for y in (5,6):print x,y;") or for s in Section.objects.all():exec("for j in s.children():print j") Sometimes you can use itertools.product (But there's no way to get the print x) like this for x, y in itertools.product((1,2,3,4), (5,6)):print x,y)


4

Seems like a simple path issue. What's the output of this: import sys; print sys.path I don't know anything about PyDev, but there's probably a setting somewhere to add paths to the PYTHONPATH setting. If not, you can do it directly in the shell: sys.path.insert(0, '/path/to/directory/containing/mysite/')


3

You can just run the script with the DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE environment variable set. That's all it takes to set up Django-shell environment. This works in Django >= 1.4


3

List comprehension may be used to achieve what you want. What you want exactly is NOT possible. >>> [(x, y) for x in (1, 2, 3, 4) for y in (5, 6)] [(1, 5), (1, 6), (2, 5), (2, 6), (3, 5), (3, 6), (4, 5), (4, 6)] Related: Single Line Nested For Loops


3

I would do a functional approach, rather than one particular query which does all of this: existing_slots = [] for placeholder in Placeholder.objects.all(): if placeholder.slot in existing_slots: placeholder.delete() else: existing_slots.append(placeholder.slot)


3

Dict is the first item in the list, so sms_raised[0]['amount'] sms_raised[0]['amount__sum']


2

You can try Torsten solution but using a dictionary instead, is way much faster. existing_slots = {} for placeholder in Placeholder.objects.all(): if existing_slots.get(placeholder.slot, False): placeholder.delete() else: existing_slots[placeholder.slot] = True


2

You can create your own custom command just like shell_plus has done: see the source of the shell_plus command to see how. In that code you can specify and run the file that needs to be executed before starting the shell. Also useful is Django's documentation on creating custom commands.


2

For testing django application you may use django test client.


2

Importing filters like this: from django.template import defaultfilters as filters filters.date( date.today() ) Instead default filters you should import your custom filter: from myApp.templatetags import poll_extras poll_extras.cut( 'ello' ) Double check settings installed app in your production server.


2

You should look at creating a fixture to populate your db https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/howto/initial-data/


2

You need to import User explicitly. The django package and a few other things are automatically imported, but not everything you might want. Also, to avoid not know what to import, there are management commands. This will leverage your Django and Python. You can learn shell scripting later.


2

Have you reset your DB table? My guess is that you defined the model previously without unique=True. The docs say that unique is enforced at the admin level and the database level, which matches your symptoms! That is.. it works in admin, not in shell. http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/fields/#django.db.models.Field.unique


2

It seems to be a known issue and fixed in Django 1.6. For the time being, there is a suggested workaround in the ticket. "Grab the following lines (from here https://github.com/django/django/blob/master/django/core/management/commands/shell.py) and replace the current implementation (...) with this": def ipython(self): try: from ...


2

You use user.set_password to set passwords in the django shell. I'm not even sure if directly setting the password via user.password would even work, since Django expects a hash of the password. The password field doesn't store passwords; it stores them as <algorithm>$<iterations>$<salt>$<hash>, so when it checks a password, it ...


2

After a significant amount of digging, I tracked down the source of the problem and it's actually already fixed on the Django trunk (it's not in the current 1.5 release, though, which is what I'm using). It turns out that Django's shell command starts up iPython like this (in django/core/management/commands/shell.py) from IPython import embed embed() ...


2

Note, this method has been deprecated for more recent versions of django! (> 1.3) An alternative answer, you could add this to the top of my_script.py from django.core.management import setup_environ import settings setup_environ(settings) and execute my_script.py just with python in the directory where you have settings.py but this is a bit hacky. $ ...


1

What database are you using? If you are using sqlite and South, there is a bug which doesn't allow adding unique constraints so sqlite tables. If that's the case, it may be that the admin form enforces the uniqueness, so the check never even gets to the database, but when you do it from the command line, it's relying on the database to enforce uniqueness ...


1

(See tldr; down) Its an old question, but just adding an answer, in case someone maybe interested. Though this might not be the best(or lets say Django) way of doing things. but you can try doing this way. Inside your django shell >>> import requests >>> r = requests.get('your_full_url_here') Explanation: I omitted the reverse(), ...



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