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57

The Site object for your Django project is missing. Each Django project has a Site object which contains the site's name and domain. It is usually automatically created when creating a Django project (in particular, when the syncdb command runs) but in your case it seems that didn't happen. To fix it: Open the Django shell for your site (python manage.py ...


30

Simple solution is to create a initial_data.json fixture for the Sites app that will override the default. For example, my fixture at /myproject/myapp/fixtures/initial_data.json: [ { "model": "sites.site", "pk": 1, "fields": { "domain": "myproject.mydomain.com", "name": "My Project" } } ] A little note: Because this is ...


21

The most compatible way to do this would be to create a user Profile model that includes a foreign key to the Site model, then write a custom auth backend that checks the current site against the value of that FK. Some sample code: Define your profile model, let's say in app/models.py: from django.db import models from django.contrib.sites.models import ...


15

The title of your question presumes that "view" and "template" are interchangeable -- they're not. In order to get the current site in a template, it needs to be added to the context that is used to render the template. If you're using a RequestContext, you can write a context processor to do this automatically. You can write a context processor to do this ...


13

Create a separate settings.py file for every site, including an appropriate SITE_ID setting. Of course you can use import statement to share common setting between files. From now on when running Django development server specify the --settings option to tell Django which site to run. For example (assuming you've got two setting files - settings_first.py ...


12

If I understand correctly, Sites framework data is stored in the database, so if I want to store this permanently, I guess it’s appropriate in an initial_data fixture. I fired up the Django shell, and did the following: >>> from django.contrib.sites.models import Site >>> one = Site.objects.all()[0] >>> one.domain = ...


10

In addition to Simeon Visser's answer for those of you still experiencing problems, make sure the SITE_ID variable in your settings matches the ID of your newly created Site-object.


7

The sites framework won't help you - they should be served as completely separate WSGI applications. But there's no need for separate Apache instances. Just configure Apache to serve separate VirtualHosts, each with its own WSGI file.


7

Define a get_absolute_url on your model. The admin uses that method to figure out how to construct the objects url. See the docs.


7

Putting 'django.contrib.sites', into your INSTALLED_APPS and a following $ ./manage.py syncdb may suffice. When installed, edit the Site instance (e.g. through /admin interface) to reflect your local hostname (e.g. localhost:8000).


6

I made a small django app that can be plugged in and play. To plug it in: download it into project directory or into where your project can find. add, in your settings.py INSTALLED_APPS, "site_default" (the app name) at the end or after "django.contrib.sites" that it depends on. Run manage.py syncdb or manage.py createdefaultsite Screen shot: ...


6

The short, official answer is you're not supposed to do this, though the docs don't really explain why not. If you're using a threaded server, I'd be concerned about a race condition. This should be quite simple to test; just put a call to sleep() in one view, then return an HttpResponse with the name of the current site. While the first view is sleeping, ...


6

You create sitemaps within the apps of your project (the ones you need sitemaps), documentation doesn't state what and where because you are free to do as you like, you only need to register them in a dictionary which is passed in the url. For example, you have a your_project which has a blog app: your_project - blog - models.py - views.py - ...


5

If you want to do this automatically, try this from django.contrib import sites from django.db.models import signals from django.conf import settings def create_site(app, created_models, verbosity, **kwargs): """ Create the default site when when we install the sites framework """ if sites.models.Site in created_models: ...


5

So, I recently did something similar, and found that the strategy below is the best option. I'm going to assume that you are familiar with git branching at this point, as well as Heroku remotes. If you aren't, you should read this first: https://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/git#multiple-remotes-and-environments The main strategy I'm taking is to have a ...


5

First, configure MODULE_MIGRATIONS in your django settings: MIGRATION_MODULES = { 'sites': 'myproject.fixtures.sites_migrations', } Then, run ./manage.py makemigrations sites to have django create the directory and create 0001_intitial.py in the myproject.fixtures.sites_migrations package. Then, do ./manage.py makemigrations --empty sites. The ...


5

Django was created from a set of scripts developed at a newspaper to publish content on multiple domains; using one single content base. This is where the "sites" module comes in. Its purpose is to mark content to be displayed for different domains. In previous versions of Python, the startproject script automatically added the django.contrib.sites ...


4

You can either use the admin interface, from the shell, or script it (if you're looking for an automated solution). Here's how to do it from the shell (and what you would put into the script): [sledge@localhost projects]$ python manage.py shell >>> from django.contrib.sites.models import Site >>> newsite = ...


4

You can do this yourself: Create a management command to prompt for your new site connect it to the post_syncdb signal The command will let you set the site conveniently from the command line. Connecting it to the signal will mean you get prompted whenever the sites app is installed. eg: from django.contrib.sites import models as sites_app ...


4

Use middleware to detect the access to the other site and set request.urlconf to the other urlconf that you want to use.


4

I hope this approach helps to you: 1) Compose username before save: from django.db import models from django.contrib.auth.models import AbstractUser from django.contrib.sites.models import Site from django.contrib.sites.managers import CurrentSiteManager class Member(AbstractUser): site = models.ForeignKey(Site) on_site = CurrentSiteManager() ...


3

I haven't used it, but this guy has attempted to solve the problem you describe and released his code: http://blog.uysrc.com/2011/03/23/serving-multiple-sites-with-django/


3

Maybe you are mislead by the documentation. You wrote: I understand that middleware sets the settings.SITE_ID value based on a lookup/cache of the request domain. This is not the case. It works exactly the other way around. Django uses the settings.SITE_ID value to look up the correct Site object in the database. This returns your prefered domain and ...


3

The ultimate solution is: OAuth But if you prefer a short cut, while integrating OAuth into all these Django sites, you can: Site A: Ken, John Site B: Ken, Joh Site C: John We have two sites, and the main sites using some resources from site B but it must be a user on site B. But the two websites do not sync users. Because OAuth was a ...


3

I'm not sure how flexible you are with your URL scheme, but how about this: Use the standard django CMS i18n URL rules (so you end up with yoursite.com/ja/ and yoursite.com/en/). Next create two pages: 'au' and 'jp'. Redirect the homepage to one of the two pages (or write some smarter logic for that, for example in a middleware). Now keep your regional ...


3

Two options: Define the domain name as a constant in your settings and use it where needed in your code. If you have only one site this is a reasonable decision as you no longer need the whole sites framework. Enable the sites framework again and define one Site object with www.example.com as domain. You'll also need to specify the site's id as SITE_ID in ...


3

You could also consider of using fixture feature of django to populate the data automatically: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/howto/initial-data/ [ { "model" : "sites.site", "pk" : 1, "fields": { "name" : "example.com", "domain" : "127.0.0.1:8010" } } ]


3

Well if you want to keep the email as the USERNAME_FIELD, which by definition in the User-model must be always unique, you won't be able to repeat it for each site. There are more than one approaches I can think of that would probably work, but I guess I would do the following: First of all, I wouldn't extend the AbstractUser-model and make a OneToOne ...


3

The documentation does highlight this but here is the summarized version: Make sure you have the correct settings. This boils down to two things: Have django.contrib.sitemaps in INSTALLED_APPS Make sure you have a site defined. It used to be that this was done by default, but from 1.6 it has become optional. However a lot of contrib apps and some third ...


2

Django's django.contrib.sites framework is nice if both sites are running under the same server and access the same database. If you have a distributed application (different sites on different hosts or different sites on different databases), you can resort to single sign-on solutions. I use OpenID with a custom provider to centralize logins between apps ...



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