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I've run into this situation. I wanted to change the field names in the model but keep the column names the same. The way I've done it is to do schemamigration --empty [app] [some good name for the migration]. The problem is that as far as South is concerned, changing the field names in the model is a change that it needs to handle. So a migration has to ...


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If your still getting the error: No fixture named 'X' found Try using the path to the json file, as manage.py is probably not being run from the project directory (it may even be run from the root directory). Try something like this: import os app_path = os.path.dirname(os.path.dirname(os.path.realpath(__file__)) json_path = os.path.join(app_path, ...


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I've generated the migrations and installed the app in a project of mine without a problem with a MySQL Db. I've not really changed anything, but I did fix an import error in your form. Your form inherits BaseInlineFormSet which you tried to import from django.forms but it should be imported from; from django.forms.models import BaseInlineFormSet I've ...


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You can use the squashmigrations management command to get there. It'll leave the old migration files in place, yet use the squashed version when installing something new. Example: ./manage.py squashmigrations core 0003_auto See official docs If you're looking to get rid of all the trial and error waste produced during development, remove the migrations ...


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Why don't you run loaddata comand from your migration then? import datetime from south.db import db from south.v2 import DataMigration from django.db import models class Migration(DataMigration): def forwards(self, orm): from django.core.management import call_command call_command("loaddata", "my_fixture.json")


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Do not use initial_data fixtures with South. Rename initial_data.json to some other name and load this fixture in the data migration: def forwards(self, orm): from django.core.management import call_command call_command("loaddata", "my_fixture.json")


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Make sure your .config file is not inside the git .gitignore file.


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This isn't exactly what South is for... but if this is how you need to handle it, I'm pretty sure you can do the following (but test it on a copy first): def forwards(self, orm): for profile in orm.Profile.objects.all(): profile.facebook = profile.facebook.split('/')[-1] profile.save()


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As far as I understand, the replacements are: from django.db import connection from django.db import transaction Usages: >>> from django.db import connection >>> connection.vendor u'postgresql' And: from django.db import connection from django.db import transaction cursor = connection.cursor() with transaction.atomic(): ...


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The fastest way to do this migration is to use raw SQL query. I don't know if your database supports UPDATE ... FROM ... JOIN syntax but the following UPDATE ... SELECT should work almost on every db-server. from south.db import db db.execute(""" UPDATE app_digitalproductformat SET checksum = (SELECT checksum FROM app_image ...


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You can also make it more general: python manage.py migrate python manage.py flush python manage.py migrate --fake This will recover all the south history after flush


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You forgot to add 'mysite' app to the INSTALLED_APPS list in the setting.py


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if django version < 1.7 python manage.py migrate yourapp --fake else python manage.py migrate --fake --fake: Records the migration sequence as having been applied, but doesn’t actually run it. -> more



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