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5

The most egregious problem here is that the code runs inside DllMain. There are severe restrictions over what you are allowed to do in DllMain. I'm quite sure that you are breaking the rules in multiple ways. You should move this code so that it is outside of DllMain. Either spawn a new thread to run the code, something that is allowed from DllMain, or ...


4

I created a test dll: library Project2; uses System.SysUtils, System.Classes, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, Winapi.Windows; {$R *.res} procedure DoStuff; stdcall; begin ShowMessage( 'ParamStr(0): '+ParamStr(0)+#13#10+ 'GetCommandLine: : '+GetCommandLine); end; exports DoStuff; begin end. And then call it from a test ...


4

typedef void* (*UnpackFile)(unsigned char*, int, LPTSTR, int); That does not match the CallingConvention property of your C# declaration. The default for C# is StdCall, the default for native C++ projects is __cdecl. Fix: typedef void* (__stdcall * UnpackFile)(unsigned char*, int, LPTSTR, int); And keep in mind that error checking is never optional ...


3

First you cannot pass the DLL to the linker like you are, it is not a file type that the linker recognizes and cannot be linked that way. When you create the Diceinvaters.dll file the linker will create an import library with the same filename and the extension .lib. It appears this is already being done. That is the library file you should pass to the ...


3

Use SymFromAddr which takes SYMBOL_INFO structure. The structure will contain the name in the Name member. Allocation memory for SYMBOL_INFO is tricky, make sure to read the documentation. How to allocate SYMBOL_INFO: const size_t array_size = 256 ; const size_t size = sizeof( SYMBOL_INFO ) + ( array_size-1 )*sizeof( TCHAR ) ; SYMBOL_INFO* symbol = ...


2

function DllTestas(var InputOutput: PAnsiChar): Longint; stdcall; This prototype is doomed to failure. It cannot reasonably be used for interop. The problem is that that there is no clarity over who allocates memory and who is responsible for tidying up. Your C# interop code is broken and just appears to work in certain scenarios. You cannot hope to ...


2

I have faced the same issue. But I have managed to Build dll of GnuMP library on Windows On windows systems ‘--cygwin*’, ‘--mingw*’ and ‘--pw32*’ by default GMP builds only a static library, but a DLL can be built instead using ./configure --disable-static --enable-shared Static and DLL libraries can't both be built, since certain export directives in ...


2

There is no apparent downside. It's a popular misconception that all what is COM related has to be in the Windows registry. On the fundamental level COM is just a convention of binary interoperability. Services available through the registry are not necessary.


1

After discussion on the SWIG user mailing list and some careful review, I discovered I was missing two configuration steps: The C++ DLL must have the same name as the module name specified in the SWIG interface file (so for my toy example using interface file example.i, it is best to name the C++ project "example" and it will generate example.dll) In the ...


1

Yes, forcing x86 is a good and simple approach, and will eork well on both desktop platforms


1

There's no way to drop the usage of the wrapping InnoCallback library since you simply cannot define a callback procedure with a calling convention of your choice in Inno Setup, nor you can define a callback with the register calling convention (the one specific to Delphi compiler) in your C# library. Due to this limit you must use an external library, ...


1

Assuming that you don't have control over that external assembly (i.e. you can't modify its code), about the only thing you can do is wrap all calls to that assembly with: var currentDir = Environment.CurrentDirectory; Environment.CurrentDirectory = @"c:\ABC"; try { // call that external assembly } finally { Environment.CurrentDirectory = ...


1

First of all, don't use absolute statements like "globals are evil". What is a global anyway? Even globals have some scope. If that scope makes logical sense, then it's certainly not evil. main is not evil, for example. An exported DLL function is similarly a "global". If you need to interact with that module, you're going to need some kind of way to access ...


1

1st, make sure you know the exact line that is causing the crash (either using print statements or through a debugger). This will make sure we're debugging the right area. Also, try printing the char* that's returned from PyBytes_AsString(). Second, you're passing a tuple to the the milp_closest.solve() function, but your example passing 4 ints. I think ...


1

If you can't change your project to x86 only then you cannot call the 32bit DLL directly. You'll have to create a 32 bit process that calls the DLL then use some inter-process communication to talk between your 64 bit process and the 32 bit hosting processing.


1

You can either fully qualify the names inline where you declare them or you can use an alias in your imports statement at the top of the file. So if you have a class Foo in Namespace1.Some.Element and also in Namespace2.Some.Element, you could do the following via aliases: Imports alias1 = Namespace1.Some.Element Imports alias2 = Namespace2.Some.Element ...


1

In fact ParamStr(0) will work fine. It is, on Windows, implemented with a call to the API function GetModuleFileName, passing a value of 0 as the module handle. This retrieves the file name associated with the main executable module. This works just the same no matter that the call is made from a DLL or the main executable. We don't really need to dig into ...


1

I ended up using the free Codefluent runtime engine to replace msscriptcontrol.dll: http://www.softfluent.com/products/codefluent-runtime-client



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