Hot answers tagged

234

I highly recommend to use Costura.Fody - by far the best and easiest way to embed resources in your assembly. It's available as NuGet package. Install-Package Costura.Fody After adding it to the project, it will automatically embed all references that are copied to the output directory into your main assembly. You might want to clean the embedded files by ...


162

Static libraries increase the size of the code in your binary. They're always loaded and whatever version of the code you compiled with is the version of the code that will run. Dynamic libraries are stored and versioned separately. It's possible for a version of the dynamic library to be loaded that wasn't the original one that shipped with your code if ...


149

There are 4 versions of the CRT link libraries present in vc\lib: libcmt.lib: static CRT link library for a release build (/MT) libcmtd.lib: static CRT link library for a debug build (/MTd) msvcrt.lib: import library for the release DLL version of the CRT (/MD) msvcrtd.lib: import library for the debug DLL version of the CRT (/MDd) Look at the linker ...


142

Others have adequately explained what a static library is, but I'd like to point out some of the caveats of using static libraries, at least on Windows: Singletons: If something needs to be global/static and unique, be very careful about putting it in a static library. If multiple DLLs are linked against that static library they will each get their own ...


129

I believe the intent was to rename System32, but so many applications hard-coded for that path, that it wasn't feasible to remove it. SysWoW64 wasn't intended for the dlls of 64-bit systems, it's actually something like "Windows on Windows64", meaning the bits you need to run 32bit apps on a 64bit windows. This article explains a bit: "Windows x64 has a ...


123

In my case it was the Explorer that was locking the DLL that was been compiled in the Debug folder... Strange, isn't it? I found out using a tool called Unlocker. Had to delete with Unlocker, even when it was saying that there was no lock over the file, and I couldn't delete the folder until I didn't delete that single file... After that it compiled. ...


122

There are static libraries (LIB) and dynamic libraries (DLL). Libraries are used because you may have code that you want to use in many programs. For example if you write a function that counts the number of characters in a string, that function will be useful in lots of programs. Once you get that function working correctly you don't want to have to ...


120

What is a DLL? Dynamic Link Libraries (DLL)s are like EXEs but they are not directly executable. They are similar to .so files in Linux/Unix. That is to say, DLLs are MS's implementation of shared libraries. DLLs are so much like an EXE that the file format itself is the same. Both EXE and DLLs are based on the Portable Executable (PE) file format. ...


116

From MSDN -Partial Classes and Methods: All partial-type definitions meant to be parts of the same type must be defined in the same assembly and the same module (.exe or .dll file). Partial definitions cannot span multiple modules.


111

Well, you don't specify if it's a 32 or 64 bit dll and you don't include the error message, but I'll guess that it's the same issue as described in this KB article: Error Message When You Run Regsvr32.exe on 64-Bit Windows Quote from that article: This behavior occurs because the Regsvr32.exe file in the System32 folder is a 64-bit version. When you run ...


107

In order for System.loadLibrary() to work, the library (on Windows, a DLL) must be in a directory somewhere on your PATH or on a path listed in the java.library.path system property (so you can launch Java like java -Djava.library.path=/path/to/dir). Additionally, for loadLibrary(), you specify the base name of the library, without the .dll at the end. So, ...


93

I found the solution by using this answer to a similar question You create 2 folders in your project one for each version of log4net. Place each log4net.dll in its corresponding folder by adding an the file to the solution (not with add reference). You can set the copy to output directory property to copy always so that it is automatically copied to the ...


93

Contrary to the suggestions by some of the other answers, using the DllImport attribute is still the correct approach. I honestly don't understand why you can't do just like everyone else in the world and specify a relative path to your DLL. Yes, the path in which your application will be installed differs on different people's computers, but that's ...


91

Make sure you remove any java.exe, javaw.exe and javaws.exe from your Windows\System32 folder and if you have an x64 system (Win 7 64 bits) also do the same under Windows\SysWOW64.


90

A crude way would be to call dumpbin with the headers option from the Visual Studio tools on each DLL and look for the appropriate output: dumpbin /headers my32bit.dll PE signature found File Type: DLL FILE HEADER VALUES 14C machine (x86) 1 number of sections 45499E0A time date stamp Thu Nov 02 03:28:10 2006 ...


87

My guess is that another assembly you are using is referencing the old dll. Are you familiar with all of the other project references being used and do any of them have a reference to the Telerik dlls? Can you put in a binding redirect in your web.config file like this? <dependentAssembly> <assemblyIdentity name="Telerik" ...


87

A static library(.a) is a library that can be linked directly into the final executable produced by the linker,it is contained in it and there is no need to have the library into the system where the executable will be deployed. A shared library(.so) is a library that is linked but not embedded in the final executable, so will be loaded when the executable ...


80

I think ctypes is the way to go. The following example of ctypes is from actual code I've written (in Python 2.5). This has been, by far, the easiest way I've found for doing what you ask. import ctypes # Load DLL into memory. hllDll = ctypes.WinDLL ("c:\\PComm\\ehlapi32.dll") # Set up prototype and parameters for the desired function call. # HLLAPI ...


80

ieshims.dll is an artefact of Vista/7 where a shim DLL is used to proxy certain calls (such as CreateProcess) to handle protected mode IE, which doesn't exist on XP, so it is unnecessary. wer.dll is related to Windows Error Reporting and again is probably unused on Windows XP which has a slightly different error reporting system than Vista and above. I ...


78

Using sn.exe utility: sn -T YourAssembly.dll or loading the assembly in Reflector.


77

If you want plain C exports, use a C project not C++. C++ DLLs rely on name-mangling for all the C++isms (namespaces etc...). You can compile your code as C by going into your project settings under C/C++->Advanced, there is an option "Compile As" which cooresponds to the compiler switches /TP and /TC. Exporting/Importing DLL Libs in VC++ What you really ...


77

You can make hamburgers with a cow, but you can't make a cow with hamburgers.


75

The only best way to do this is to check the compiled assemblies itself. There is this very useful tool called '.NET Assembly Information' found here by Rotem Bloom. After you install this, it associates itself with .dll files to open with itself. After installing you can just double-click on the Assembly to open and it will give you the assembly details as ...


75

I don't know why everybody is answering this question in context of .NET. The question was a general one and didn't mention .NET anywhere. Well, the major differences are: EXE An exe always runs in its own address space i.e., It is a separate process. The purpose of an EXE is to launch a separate application of its own. DLL A dll always needs a host ...


75

If the DLL is 32 bit: Copy the DLL to C:\Windows\SysWoW64\ In an elevated command prompt: %windir%\SysWoW64\regsvr32.exe %windir%\SysWoW64\namedll.dll if the DLL is 64 bit: Copy the DLL to C:\Windows\System32\ In an elevated command prompt: %windir%\System32\regsvr32.exe %windir%\System32\namedll.dll I know it seems the wrong way round, but that's the ...


73

For people that cant find "System.Web" at .Net References, this might be the answer: "you need to right-click the project -> properties -> then change the "Target framework" which will probably be ".NET Framework 4 Client Profile" to just ".NET Framework 4". The answer was given by Tinister (thanks) as a reply to a previuos post. But I thought it was a ...


72

You can have separate configuration file, but you'll have to read it "manually", the ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["key"] will read only the config of the running assembly. First, in the VS project right click --> Add --> New item --> Application Configuration File This will add App.config to the project folder, put your settings in there under ...


71

If you are using .NET 4.0. or higher, take a look at the: MethodRental.SwapMethodBody Method Other way: CLR Injection: Runtime Method Replacer


70

Gory details A DLL uses the PE executable format, and it's not too tricky to read that information out of the file. See this MSDN article on the PE File Format for an overview. You need to read the MS-DOS header, then read the IMAGE_NT_HEADERS structure. This contains the IMAGE_FILE_HEADER structure which contains the info you need in the Machine member ...


69

After all the debate that went on in the comments, I think that it's better to summarize my positions in a "real" answer. First of all, it's still not clear why you need to load a dll in DllMain with LoadLibrary. This is definitely a bad idea, since your DllMain is running inside another call to LoadLibrary, which holds the loader lock, as explained by the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible