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80

That's bug no 961964 of MATLAB known since R2012b (8.0). MATLAB dynamically loads some libs with static TLS (thread local storage, e.g. see gcc compiler flag -ftls-model). Loading too many such libs => no space left. Until now mathwork's only workaround is to load the important(!) libs first by using them early (they suggest to put "ones(10)*ones(10);" in ...


28

Building your shared library with -pie option appears to give you everything you want: /* pie.c */ #include <stdio.h> int foo() { printf("in %s %s:%d\n", __func__, __FILE__, __LINE__); return 42; } int main() { printf("in %s %s:%d\n", __func__, __FILE__, __LINE__); return foo(); } /* main.c */ #include <stdio.h> extern int ...


25

First, you should generally use -fPIC flag when building shared libraries. Not using it "works" on 32-bit Linux, but would fail on 64-bit one with an error similar to: /usr/bin/ld: /tmp/ccUUrz9c.o: relocation R_X86_64_32 against `.rodata' can not be used when making a shared object; recompile with -fPIC Second, your program will work as you expect after ...


22

Correct solution is to add -rdynamic to the link command of the main executable. This will add appropriate option to ld (which, when using GNU ld, happens to be --export-dynamic). Adding --export-dynamic directly is technically incorrect: it's a linker option, and so should be added as -Wl,--export-dynamic, or -Wl,-E. This is also less portable than ...


20

You can define an on-load function for a linux library using the .init mechanism. This is the same as specifying the load-time entry point for a binary (e.g. using something other than main as the entry point for a program). When linking using ld directly you use the: -init <function name> or if you're using cc/gcc to link, you use: ...


18

Restarting Matlab solved the problem for me.


17

Libraries should export initialization and cleanup routines using the gcc __attribute__((constructor)) and __attribute__((destructor)) function attributes. See the gcc info pages for information on these. Constructor routines are executed before dlopen returns (or before main() is started if the library is loaded at load time). Destructor ...


17

If you rm the library prior to installing the new one, I think your system will keep the inode allocated, the file open, and your program running. (And when your program finally exits, then the mostly-hidden-but-still-there file resources are released.) Update: Ok, post-clarification. The dynamic linker actually completely "solves" this problem by passing ...


15

I found the answer to my question here. As I understand it, I need to make the typeinfo available in 'testc' available to the library 'testd'. To do this when using dlopen(), two extra things need to be done: When linking the library, pass the linker the -E option, to make sure it exports all symbols to the executable, not just the ones that are unresolved ...


12

What dlsym() returns is normally a function pointer - disguised as a void *. (If you ask it for the name of a global variable, it will return you a pointer to that global variable, too.) You then invoke that function just as you might using any other pointer to function: int (*fun)(int, char *) = (int (*)(int, char *))dlsym(triangle, "function"); ...


12

Run otool -L on it, and it will show its actually version. I choose libSystem.B as it has different version in the 10.4 and 10.5 SDKs: $ otool -L /Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.4u.sdk/usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib /Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.4u.sdk/usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib: /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 88.3.11) ...


10

Code of dlo.c (the lib): #include <stdio.h> // function is defined in main program void callb(void); void test(void) { printf("here, in lib\n"); callb(); } Compile with gcc -shared -olibdlo.so dlo.c Here the code of the main program (copied from dlopen manpage, and adjusted): #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include ...


10

Try: g++ -fPIC -rdynamic -o testexe testexe.cpp -ldl Without the -rdynamic (or something equivalent, like -Wl,--export-dynamic), symbols from the application itself will not be available for dynamic linking.


10

Yes, you can use dlsym to access globals (as long as they are exported, and not static). The example below is in C++ and Mac, but obviously C will work fine. lib.cpp: extern "C" { int barleyCorn = 12; } uselib.cpp #include <dlfcn.h> #include <iostream> using namespace std; main() { void * f = dlopen ("lib.dylib", RTLD_NOW); void * obj ...


9

Yes. When a library is opened, all static construction takes place... so, if you use C++, you can do: // mylibrary.cpp namespace { class dynamic_library_load_unload_handler { public: dynamic_library_load_unload_handler(){ // Code to execute when the library is loaded } ...


8

The dynamic linker actually searches several places to find each dynamic library. These include (from man ld.so): Paths given by the environment variable LD_LIBRARY_PATH Paths baked into the binary load the library under the DT_RUNPATH entry The cache file /etc/ld.so.cache /lib and /usr/lib If you want to get the path for a specific shared library, I ...


8

Actually, you can do nearly all you want. In C language (unlike C++, for example), the functions in shared objects are referenced merely by their names. So, to find--and, what is most important, to call--the proper function, you don't need its full signature. You only need its name! It's both an advantage and disadvantage --but that's the nature of a ...


8

There is no libc function to do that. However, you can write one yourself (though the code is somewhat involved). On Linux, dlopen() in fact returns the address of a link_map structure, which has a member named l_addr that points to the base address of the loaded shared object (assuming your system doesn't randomize shared library placement, and that your ...


8

You can't open executables as libraries. The entry point of an executable will attempt to re-initialize the C library, and take over the brk pointer. This will corrupt your malloc heap. Additionally, the executable is likely to be mapped at a fixed address with no relocations, and if this address overlaps with anything already loaded, it's not possible to ...


8

you could use ... dlinfo(handle, RTLD_DI_LINKMAP, p) p->l_name ... where p is of type Link_map** see man dlinfo for details


8

I've had success using dlopen on iOS for years. In my use case, I use dlopen to load public system frameworks on demand instead of having them loaded on app launch. Works great! [EDIT] - as of iOS 8, extensions and shared frameworks are prohibited from using dlopen, however the application itself can still use dlopen (and is now documented as being ...


7

Would ctypes do what you want?


7

After some further problems and some further Googling I ultimately found the real cause of my problem. One cannot call dlopen a library linked with CoreFoundation in a (sub) thread if CoreFoundation wasn't initialized in the first place. CFInitialize is called, apparently checks if the thread is the main thread and if it is not, crashes with a SIGTRAP. ...


7

This error almost always says "Cannot find library" and there can be many reasons for this. What is annoying is that in most cases it is not the missing library but something else. Reasons I have stumbled upon: library is missing from the directory (obviously), library that is dynamically linked with your library is missing, system library versions on the ...


7

In Linux/ELF you can pass the --export-dynamic option to the linker (-rdynamic on the compiler driver gcc) so symbols from the executable are exported to shared objects. You'd have a dummy print implementation in your library, which would be shadowed by the implementation on your executable, since the executable is usually searched before shared objects ...


7

Unfortunately, the words "static" and "dynamic" are way too overused, especially in C and C++. So, I prefer the following terminology: Link-time linking, a.k.a "static linking": All symbols are resolved at link time from static libraries. The result is a monolithic, statically linked executable with no load-time dependencies. Load-time linking: This is the ...


7

Short Answer It won't work the way you are doing it. There might also be other problems with your approach that haven't bitten you yet. Why it doesn't work Undefined symbols in your program/library are resolved at different times. On most systems, data references (global variables, class vtables, etc.) are always resolved when your program/library is ...


6

If you install a new version of the library, the correct procedure is to create a new file in the same directory, then rename it over the old one. The old file will remain while it's open, and continue to be used. Package managers like RPM do this automatically - so you can update shared libraries and executables while they're running - but the old versions ...


6

If dlclose reduces the reference count to zero and the library is actually unloaded, any future reloading of the library should reset all variables with static storage duration in the library to their original values. However, if the library was opened more than once, all but the final call to dlclose will just decrement the reference count. Sometimes it ...



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