Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

DMD is the reference implementation. Only the backend is proprietary, the frontend is open source. The code generation quality is not that overwhelming. x64 support is just a few months old though. GDC and LDC are both based on the DMD frontend so it might take some time until a new version of the frontend is merged in. Since the backends they use are very ...


18

If you are using D2, you need to import std.stdio;: import std.stdio; void main(string args[]) { auto f = File("test.txt", "w"); f.writeln("Hello, Worlds!"); } If you are using D1, the File class is in std.stream, and the API is slightly different: import std.stream; void main() { auto f = new File("test.txt", FileMode.Out); f.writeLine("Hello, ...


18

Almost all overloaded operators in D are templates by definition. Notice that void opOpAssign(string op)(Vector vector) has a template parameter which is a string. So, no you can't overload it as a non-template function. Now, you don't need a second template to do it (so if by asking whether you need a template, you mean a helper template, then the answer is ...


17

There's no exact equivalent in D. Here are some rough equivalents: Using opApply-style internal iteration. This doesn't allow iterating over two iterators in lockstep, though: struct Foo { int opApply(int delegate(ref int) dg) { int a = 1, b = 1; int result; while(true) { result = dg(b); if(result) ...


16

All 3 of the main D compilers (dmd, gdc, ldc) use the same front-end, but dmd is generally a bit ahead of the others as it's the reference compiler. Also, I believe that there are a few cases where the other 2 don't implement some features yet (primarily on Windows or OS X IIRC), though in general, they work just fine. The primary advantage to gdc or ldc is ...


13

See here; example excerpt below: module main; import std.stdio; import generators; void genSquares(out int result, int from, int to) { foreach (x; from .. to + 1) yield!result(x * x); } void main(string[] argv) { foreach (sqr; generator(&genSquares, 10, 20)) writeln(sqr); }


13

Use alias! struct Vector2(T) { T x, y; alias x u; alias y v; }


13

this is meant to be combined with mixins void opOpAssign(string op)(Vector vector) { mixin("X"~op~"=vector.X;"); mixin("Y"~op~"=vector.Y;"); } not to mention this can easily be coupled to other arithmetic operations Vector opBinary(string op)(Vector l)if(op=="+"||op=="-"){//only addition and subtraction makes sense for 2D vectors ...


12

I take it you mean "Psuedo Members" as talked about in section 5.9.1. Currently this feature is only implemented for arrays, though this is a planned feature. In the D community you will also see it referred to as "Uniform Function Call Syntax." Here's the bug report which will be closed when this feature is implemented: Issue 3382


11

Try adding this near the top of the file: import std.algorithm;


11

On this line: glVertexAttribPointer(position, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, vertices.sizeof, null); are you sure that you want vertices.sizeof, which has a value of 16? In D, a dynamic array is a struct with two members (ptr and length). You probably want either float.sizeof or float.sizeof * 2. And the same goes for your BufferData calls.


11

All strings are treated as ranges of dchar. That's because a dchar is guaranteed to be a single code point, since in UTF-32, every code unit is a code point, whereas in UTF-8 (char) and UTF-16 (wchar), the number of code units per code point varies. So, if you were operating on individual chars or wchars, you'd be operating on pieces of characters rather ...


11

Easy. import std.conv; import std.stdio; void main() { float x = to!float("234.32"); double y = to!double("234.32"); writefln("And the float is: %f\nHey, we also got a double: %f", x, y); } std.conv is the swiss army knife of conversion in D. It's really impressive!


11

Use DMD as it is the reference implementation and is most widely used. It is also the most up to date as new features and fixes are primarily released in DMD (but GDC and LDC are released not too long after DMD). As a newcomer you should consider DMD first, until you find specifics, which you need but don't find in DMD, then you can consider using GDC or ...


9

The obj2asm utility is provided by the DMD compiler suite, which is available for free (under a dual GPL and Artistic license). See DMD Compiler for Linux on the D Programming Language website.


9

You're missing a new version of DMD. This bug was fixed (silently) in v2.052 (at commit 86a080f).


9

The text is outdated. Replace char[] with string and it'll work.


8

the header is on it's own line right? so why not check for it and use an appender to allocate for the value auto current = std.array.appender!(char[]); string name; foreach(ulong n, char[] line; file) { auto entry = match(line,entry_name); if(entry){//we are in a header line if(name){//write what was caught ...


8

I believe it's because readf handles spaces differently than scanf in C. You need to explicitly read in the spaces, so change readf("%d", &n) to readf("%d ", &n) and it should work (hopefully). Here's a quote from Andrei, who implemented the function: This is by design. The example works when modified as follows: import std.stdio; void ...


8

Basically, what it comes down to is that string literals are stored in a read-only part of memory. char[] is "a mutable array of mutable characters", which would, if written to, generate a run-time crash. So the compiler is really trying to protect you here. invariant(char)[] means "a mutable array of invariant characters", which is exactly what it is. ...


7

I was searching around the arrays section of the guide, this may help: A string is an array of characters. String literals are just an easy way to write character arrays. String literals are immutable (read only). char[] str1 = "abc"; // error, "abc" is not mutable char[] str2 = "abc".dup; // ok, make mutable copy ...


7

When you get errors like that, it means that DMD cannot find the import file. If you import foo.bar.xyz, then it expects it to find a xyz.d in some directory foo\bar\. It searches for this directory in all its standard import paths, as well as the current directory (for example, if you added a directory std next to your tcpechoserver.d with a stdio.d in it, ...


7

Significant drawback of DMD is shared library deficiency: on Windows on Linux I personally was surprised that GDC supports D2, but they say it does: D1: 1.067 D2: 2.053 LDC definitely seems to be scarcely maintained: "D2 is working on x86-32 Linux only". To me, it's a showstopper issue. While searching for LDC I've found one more compiler (?!): dil. ...


7

I asked around on IRC, and as far as we can figure out it was never implemented for D1, so we're guessing it's still unimplemented. Furthermore, there is no mention of the feature in The D Programming Language, so the whole thing is up in the air a bit. If I were you, I would submit a bug against the documentation.


7

the issue is that opIndexAssigne needs the value first and then the keys (or indices) http://www.d-programming-language.org/operatoroverloading.html#Assignment so you'll want to define it as public void opIndexAssign( String val , String key) { Value* v = new Value() ; v.putVstring( val ) ; this.Put(key, v , DontDelete); } public void ...


7

There is no type called function. A function must specified the return type and argument type like int function(double, string). If you want to support any kind of function, use a template static void GetProc(T)(out T f) if (isFunctionPointer!T) ...


7

To convert from most any type to most any other type, use std.conv.to. e.g. auto d = to!double("234.32"); or auto str = to!string(234.32); On the other hand, if you're looking to parse several whitespace-separated values from a string (removing the values from the string as you go), then use std.conv.parse. e.g. auto str = "123 456.7 false"; auto i = ...


7

Adding to Jonathan's answer: Your choice is also constrained by OS you are using. On Linux, all 3 (DMD, GDC and LDC) are available. On Windows, DMD is your only practical choice, especially if you are used to Visual Studio (get Visual D add-on). Using GDC or LDC on Windows involves varying degrees of pain (see this discussion). If you want to play with ...


7

If you are passing the only reference of an object allocated in D code from the D heap to non-D code, then you must either register it as a GC root, or change your code to use malloc instead of allocating from the managed D heap. Otherwise, the GC will think that the object is unused, and collect it to free memory.


7

@nogc is a new attribute and is first implemented in DMD 2.066.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible