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7

@nogc is a new attribute and is first implemented in DMD 2.066.


6

__traits(parent, ...) is about scopes. __traits(parent, B) is the test module. The documentation is too vague about this. std.traits.BaseClassesTuple is what you're looking for. As a general rule, look in std.traits first. The ugly __traits shouldn't come up in user code often. Some working sample code: module test; import std.stdio; import std.traits; ...


6

there is no guarantee that D string will be 0-terminated. it just happens by chance with dmd. the correct way is to use toStringz() function from std.string module. p.s. please note that string literals are 0-terminated, that's why hardcoded arguments works.


6

Why is the program printing the name of the constant instead of its value? As a general rule, writeln and other functions print the names of enum values, since for e.g. numeric types the name conveys more information than a number. And how to print the string value then? Just cast it to a string: cast(string)XYZ.A


6

You can use the predefined __VERSION__ constant. See also the std.compiler module (version_major and version_minor, specifically) for an easier way to use it. However, your workaround might be a better approach. It will allow the code to work correctly even for compiler builds between released versions.


5

You got the syntax of -offilename wrong. filename is a sample value. You need to replace it: -of..\bin\example.exe. Many other dmd options work in the same way. Also, rdmd doesn't pass arguments that come after the source file to dmd. They are interpreted as arguments to the program that's built and run (regardless of --build-only). That means, you need to ...


5

What it does is use compile time reflection on the enum type to get a list of members (the names as strings) and their values. It constructs a switch statement out of this information for a fast lookup to get the name from a value. to!SomeEnum("a_string") uses the same principle, just in the other direction. The compile time reflection info is accessed with ...


4

int8_t is a typedef in C/C++ to the signed char (8 bits, signed integer). This type corresponds to the byte in D, so to!byte(nblocks) should work.


3

Use std.typecons.Rebindable: class A { void aMethod() { } void aConstMethod() const { } } class B { import std.typecons: Rebindable; Rebindable!(const A) a; // Not initialized in the constructor, but at a latter time void initA() { a = new A(); // Error: can only initialize const member 'a' inside constructor } ...


3

With 'of' option, it is meant that you replace the 'filename' with the name of your output file, like this: rdmd --build-only -of../bin/example.exe example.d This works for me in my projects' makefile. EDIT: I forgot that the order of arguments also matters with DMD.


3

It seems that this results from the way that rdmd orders the unit tests, which is not in the way I'd expected. It appears that RDMD calls the unit tests for an instantiated template class not at the time of instantiation, but instead immediately after the unit test in which the class is instantiated has completed. Here's a MWE: import std.stdio; class ...


2

The simplest solution is to open the command prompt via the D2 32-bit Command Prompt shortcut, which is placed in your Start Menu during installation. This will open a command prompt with the environment set up so you can invoke dmd as in your question.


2

You'll find all the details and track progress from https://issues.dlang.org/show_bug.cgi?id=12578 Local functions aren't visible outside of their scope. Their use is pretty limited, and so there isn't much of any benefit to overloadability. Forward references aren't allowed in local scope, meaning any use of overloading would be fairly restricted ...


2

Oh, it was simple: -ofPath/To/Your/Out/Folder/ExeName


2

real has a bit of a strange size: it is 80 bits of data, but if you check real.sizeof, you'll see it is bigger than that (at least on Linux, I think it is 10 bytes on Windows, I betcha you wouldn't see this bug there). The reason is to make sure it is aligned on a word boundary - a multiple of four bytes - for the processor to load more efficient in arrays. ...


1

What about something like this: module main; import std.stdio: writeln; enum SIZE = 3; enum NA = -1; struct Int { int v = -1; alias v this; } struct S { Int [SIZE] [SIZE] a; } void main() { S s; writeln(s); }


1

Simply lowercase all keys of the associative array before you store or query them.


1

if the case is either all lower or all upper, then you might have something like "xxx" in foo && logInfo(foo["xxx"]); "XXX" in foo && logInfo(foo["XXX"]); maybe there's more efficient way to do this. If you don't have control over how the keys are entered in the AA, then it seems you have to check all casing variants when querying a ...


1

Answer I came up with, don't. Simply use the DMD compiler for the last step So, Instead of dmd ../src/Main.d -I../src -c gcc -c ../ext/clibs.c gcc *.o -o Main Simply dmd ../src/Main.d -I../src -c gcc -c ../ext/clibs.c dmd *.o You still have to write a D bridging header listing all the C function you want to use with the extern (C) syntax For example ...


1

The std.concurrency module now has a Generator class which makes this even easier (and you don't need a third-party library). The class is an input range, so it can be used with for loops and all the standard std.range/std.algorithm functions. import std.stdio; import std.range; import std.algorithm; import std.concurrency : Generator, yield; void ...


1

You might need to specify the full path to where you placed the dmd compiler: "c:\Some_Folder\dmd.exe" helloworld.d or add it to the PATH environment variable.



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