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14

rbind.data.frame does a lot of checking you don't need. This should be a pretty quick transformation if you only do exactly what you want. # Use data from Josh O'Brien's post. set.seed(21) X <- replicate(50000, data.frame(a=rnorm(5), b=1:5), simplify=FALSE) system.time({ Names <- names(X[[1]]) # Get data.frame names from first list element. # For ...


13

You can use alist rather then list p <- alist(xlab=expression(paste("Concentration (",mu,"M)"))) do.call(plot,c(y~x,p))


12

do.call evaluates the parameters before running the function; try wrapping the expression in quote: p <- list(xlab=quote(expression(paste("Concentration (",mu,"M)")))) do.call("plot", c(y~x, p))


12

Since I'm in an evangelizing mood ... here's what the fast data.table solution would look like: library(data.table) dt <- data.table(nuc, key="gene_id") dt[,list(A=min(start), B=max(end), C=mean(pctAT), D=mean(pctGC), E=sum(length)), by=key(dt)] # gene_id A B C D E # 1: NM_032291 ...


12

Given that you are looking for performance, it appears that a data.table solution should be suggested. There is a function rbindlist which is the same but much faster than do.call(rbind, list) library(data.table) X <- replicate(50000, data.table(a=rnorm(5), b=1:5), simplify=FALSE) system.time(rbindlist.data.table <- rbindlist(X)) ## user system ...


11

The do.call function is very useful here: A <- 1:10 B <- 11:20 C <- 20:11 > do.call(cbind, list(A,B,C)) [,1] [,2] [,3] [1,] 1 11 20 [2,] 2 12 19 [3,] 3 13 18 [4,] 4 14 17 [5,] 5 15 16 [6,] 6 16 15 [7,] 7 17 14 [8,] 8 18 13 [9,] 9 19 12 [10,] 10 20 11


11

Use do.call(f, list(P, TIT), quote=TRUE) instead. The problem is that your expression is being evaluated when you run do.call. By setting quote=TRUE it will quote the arguments to leave them un-evaluated when passing them along to f. You can also explicitly quote TIT do.call(f, list(P, quote(TIT)))


10

You can avoid do.call(rbind,...) by using data.table::rbindlist. This will return a data.table. data.tables don't have rownames. It is also blindingly fast! library(data.table) allputs <- rbindlist(lapply(OC, FUN = function(x) x$puts)) # my eyes, I'm blinded! If you want to include the original rownames as a column then lputs <- lapply(OC, FUN = ...


10

After some poking around, alist seems to do the trick: x <- matrix(1:6, nrow=3) x [,1] [,2] [1,] 1 4 [2,] 2 5 [3,] 3 6 # 1st row do.call(`[`, alist(x, 1, )) [1] 1 4 # 2nd column do.call(`[`, alist(x, , 2)) [1] 4 5 6 From ?alist: ‘alist’ handles its arguments as if they described function arguments. So the values are not ...


10

I've always used TRUE as a placeholder in this instance: > x [,1] [,2] [,3] [1,] 1 3 5 [2,] 2 4 6 > do.call("[", list(x, TRUE,1)) [1] 1 2 Let's use a somewhat more complex x example: x <- array(1:36, c(2,9,2), then if the desire is for a vector to be substituted in a list of subscripts that will recover all of the first and ...


8

Looks like a textbook use case for Reduce. merge.all <- function(x, y) { merge(x, y, all=TRUE, by="Sample") } output <- Reduce(merge.all, DataList)


8

do.call can be extremely slow on large objects. I think this is due to how it constructs the call, but I'm not certain. A faster alternative would be the data.table package. Or, as @Andrie suggested in a comment, use tapply for each calculation and cbind the results. A note on your current implementation: rather than doing the subsetting in your ...


8

Your observation that the time taken increases exponentially with the number of data.frames suggests that breaking the rbinding into two stages could speed things up. This simple experiment seems to confirm that that's a very fruitful path to take: ## Make a list of 50,000 data.frames X <- replicate(50000, data.frame(a=rnorm(5), b=1:5), simplify=FALSE) ...


8

There is, of course, the interleave function in the "gdata" package: library(gdata) interleave(a, b) # x y # 1 1 5 # 6 2 4 # 2 2 4 # 7 3 3 # 3 3 3 # 8 4 2 # 4 4 2 # 9 5 1 # 5 5 1 # 10 6 0


7

You can use substitute, which is also useful for when you want to use variable names as labels. do.call("fix",list(substitute(dfr))) Edit for clarity It is easier to see how this works by using the call command: > call("fix",dfr) fix(list(x = c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5), y = 1:5)) > call("fix",substitute(dfr)) fix(dfr) Thus when you use substitute the ...


7

You might want to look at do.call(), which calls a function with arguments supplied in a list. It is not to hard to write a wrapper around this that does exactly what you want. function1=function(a,b)a+b function2=function(a,b,c)a+b+c do.call("function1",list(1,2)) do.call("function2",list(1,2,3)) EDIT: A wrapper would be: ...


7

Setting quote=TRUE also works. It in effect prevents do.call() from evaluating the elements of args before it passes them to the function given by what. x <- 1:10 y <- x^1.5 p <- list(xlab=expression(paste("Concentration (",mu,"M)",sep=""))) do.call(what = "plot", args = c(y ~ x, p), quote = TRUE)


7

As noted by Frank, the problem is that there are (somewhat invisibly) several different types of NA. The one produced when you type NA at the command line is of class "logical", but there are also NA_integer_, NA_real_, NA_character_, and NA_complex_. In your first example, the initial data.table sets the class of column b to "character", and the NA in the ...


7

Not a straight answer, but I'll demo asub as an alternative as I am pretty sure this is what the OP is eventually after. library(abind) Extract 1st row: asub(x, idx = list(1), dims = 1) Extract second and third column: asub(x, idx = list(2:3), dims = 2) Remove the last item from dimension shortdim as the OP wanted: asub(x, idx = ...


6

Here's another alternative. You can add more functions to the switch list. func1 <- function(a, b) a + b func2 <- function(a, b) a - b applyfunction <- function(FUN, arg1, arg2) { appFun <- switch(FUN, func1, # FUN == 1 func2, # FUN == 2 stop("function ", FUN, " not defined")) # default appFun(arg1, arg2) } ...


6

Not sure whether you already know the row positions, or if you want to search for them. Either way, this should cover both. require(data.table) set.seed(1) DT = data.table(a=sample(1:1000,20), b=sample(1:1000,20)) setkey(DT,a) DT # a b # 1: 62 338 # 2: 175 593 # 3: 201 267 # 4: 204 478 # 5: 266 935 # 6: 372 212 # 7: 374 711 # 8: 380 184 # ...


5

The following works (up to some final column renaming): res <- Reduce(function(a,b){ ans <- merge(a,b,by="row.names",all=T) row.names(ans) <- ans[,"Row.names"] ans[,!names(ans) %in% "Row.names"] }, list(x,y,z)) Indeed: > res V1.x V1.y V1 a 10 1 3 b 13 2 4 c 14 NA 3 d NA NA 11 What ...


5

You can do this by giving x and y an index, rbind them and sort by the index. a = data.frame(x=1:5, y=5:1) b = data.frame(x=2:6, y=4:0) df <- rbind(data.frame(a, index = 1:nrow(a)), data.frame(b, index = 1:nrow(b))) df <- df[order(df$index), c("x", "y")]


5

If you really want it done 'by the numbers': > applyfunction=function(n,a,b){get(paste("func",n,sep=""))(a,b)} > func1=function(a,b){a+b} > func2=function(a,b){a*b} > applyfunction(1,4,3) [1] 7 > applyfunction(2,4,3) [1] 12 Uses get and paste to get the function associated with a name.


5

You want to use alist within your call to do.call. alist handles its arguments as if they described function arguments. So the values are not evaluated do.call(what="PrintObjectName", args=alist(obj=iris)) # [1] "iris" or you could use quote do.call(what="PrintObjectName", args=list(obj=quote(iris)))


5

merge doesn't accept more than 2 data.frames, so you can't pass it a larger list using do.call: do.call(merge, list(iris, iris, iris)) #Error in fix.by(by.x, x) : # 'by' must specify one or more columns as numbers, names or logical Use Reduce instead: Reduce(function(x, y) merge(x, y, by="Species"), list(iris, iris, iris)) #works


4

You should use mget to get the data of each dataframe of the df_list. So you can do: dataset <- do.call(rbind, mget(df_list)) Note that this implies that all the rows are of the same length. Probably you find useful also the merge function. Thanks alexis_laz, I forgot the do.call.


4

Use do.call: do.call( stargazer, l ) However, this precludes passing in arguments in the usual way: > do.call( stargazer, l, type="text" ) Error in do.call(stargazer, l, type = "text") : unused argument (type = "text") Therefore, you have to add the named arguments to the list: l$type <- "text" l$align <- TRUE l$title <- "Results" ...


4

Please make sure you are using an up-to-date version of the package. Starting with version 4.5.3 (available on CRAN since Nov 2013), stargazer has been able to accept lists of object in exactly the way you would expect: stargazer(l, title="Results", align=TRUE, type="text")


4

This seems to work, but i'm not sure if it has other implications I'm not considering: fun_wrap1 <- function(){ funa1 <- function(x) x^2 funb1 <- function(x) x^3 lapply(c('funa1', 'funb1'), do.call, args=list(x=3), envir=environment()) } fun_wrap1() #[[1]] #[1] 9 # #[[2]] #[1] 27 So this is essentially equivalent to having the lapply ...



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