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32

Well, I haven't used DocBook, but from a quick look on wikipedia and google: DocBook does not have elements to describe mathematics. DocBook is XML, as you say. To me, that makes it a horrible thing to write by-hand (or, rather, with a basic text editor). Maybe you enjoy writing XML, or have a good IDE. I guess you could look at this question. DocBook'...


32

DocBook isn't "a typesetting mechanism". DocBook is all about separating presentation from content. DocBook only deals with content; it's used to create an abstract representation of a book, article, etc. There are numerous tools out there which layout DocBook according to predefined templates. Some of these tools use LaTeX. AFAIK, O'Reilly uses a slightly ...


26

The great thing about DocBook is that it is XML based - so a chapter is a full subtree, a section is a full subtree, etc. In LaTeX, separation is only determined by the structure of the document during a linear scan. The worst thing about Docbook is that it is XML based - lower-level stuff is extremely dirty and annoying to code manually.


24

I see three options (available in Debian/Ubuntu) to generate pdf from docbook: jade, which provides the docbook2pdf command the asker used. jade is ancient and works with SGML, which predates XML and does not support Unicode; it also lacks support for docbook 5. the docbook-xsl stylesheets which go through XSL-FO. docbook-xsl is for docbook 4.5, docbook-...


22

To echo @akosma comment, pandoc does indeed have AsciiDoc support: # Convert to AsciiDoc from Markdown: $ pandoc -t asciidoc -f markdown file1.md > file1.txt You can also go directly from Markdown to HTML: $ pandoc -S -t html -f markdown file1.md > file1.html (The -S just to produce nice curly quotes and other Smart typographical changes)


15

I'm not really familiar with DocBook, though I have used LaTeX fairly extensively. The idea of LaTeX is not to produce a customized document, it's to produce a readable, attractive document. It's a set of libraries, templates, macros, and so forth around TeX, set up by people who know what they are doing when it comes to document design. Of course, you have ...


13

I've been doing some manual writing with DocBook, under cygwin, to produce One Page HTML, Many Pages HTML, CHM and PDF. I installed the following: The docbook stylesheets (xsl) repository. xmllint, to test if the xml is correct. xsltproc, to process the xml with the stylesheets. Apache's fop, to produce PDF's.I make sure to add the installed folder to the ...


11

I'm working on a project which uses docbook, and has examples in PHP. The examples in PHP are using programlisting tag, like this : <programlisting language="php"><![CDATA[<?php // Here goes the PHP code ]]></programlisting> Note the language attribute. It is used later by another tool to add syntax-coloration, when generating the ...


10

For a printed manual I go with LaTeX. MikTex is the best Windows implementation in my opinion. My preferred editor is WinEdt There is a great LaTeX tutorial by Tobias Oetiker If it is going to be primarily an electronic manual and users will be online then a controlled wiki may be a good option. You should ask yourself what features are important. Do you ...


9

Import the docbook stylesheets from your own XSLT. Then, (re)define the Docbook template that you want to "override". Since your template will be the highest in the import tree, it will take precedence. By doing it that way you don't have to modify any of the core docbook XSLT files. It will make upgrades of the Docbook stylesheets easier in the ...


9

There is no parameter, but you only need to add <xsl:template name="generate.html.title"/> to your customization layer. This overrides the original template (in html.xsl) and disables output of the title attributes.


8

At the risk of sounding unpopular, I'd really like to suggest using DocBook, along with a decent XML editor (preferably one that can crunch DocBook nicely). There is an XSLT toolchain available that can generate various different output formats including HTML or PostScript (which can be easily converted to PDF or printed). While DocBook isn't the easiest ...


8

docbook is probably what you want.


8

Yes, LaTeX is kind of difficult to configure to produce exactly the kind of layout you want. I suggest you take a look at the manual of the LaTeX class memoir to see what kinds of layouts it enables you to produce. There is a book on DocBook available online. Take a look at that too, to see what kind of layouts you can produce and if you can easily format ...


8

About two years ago, I tried to like and use DocBook; however, I returned to LaTeX because, at least at the time, LaTeX produced better quality output (PDFs). I never managed to get the DocBook to LaTeX to PDF translation working. My problems were likely "operator error", but I suggest trying DocBook (and LaTeX) for a few simple documents before choosing ...


8

I also couldn't find such a converter and I wrote one yesterday: https://github.com/wojdyr/db2rst It's very limited. At this moment it handles only Docbook elements that I have in my docs, and it doesn't translate internal links properly yet. It uses lxml to parse DocBook, I don't know how this would work with SGML, I used it for XML DocBook only. 2016 ...


7

DocBook is one of the many supported inputs to Doxia, the engine used to generate docs by maven. Refer here: http://maven.apache.org/doxia/modules/index.html In fact, the Doxia site answers your exact question: http://maven.apache.org/doxia/book/index.html


7

I don't want to go down the "easier" or better route as I regard this as a matter of taste and getting used to. I see docbook being XML as an advantage as therefore it can be morphed into almost anything you like by using XSLT. Combined with its self-containedness it feels more like structuring content that Latex does. Especially documenting open source ...


7

We use sphinx: http://sphinx.pocoo.org It does almost all of that. Your python script or your users or whomever (I can't follow the question) can create content using RST markup (which is perhaps the easiest of markup languages). You run it through Sphinx and you get HTML and Latex.


7

You could use the following bindings file with the DocBook version 5 XML Schema: binding.xml <jxb:bindings xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:jxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb" xmlns:xjc="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb/xjc" jxb:extensionBindingPrefixes="xjc" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:xml=...


6

You can easily create a site (that contains documentation) with Maven using the mvn site command (i.e. using the plugin site). This plugin creates technical reports (such as Javadoc, Unit tests reports, code coverage...) but can be also used to create a "real site". You have more details about that in this page. Basically, you write your page using APT (...


6

DITA can generate different kinds of output and is written in XML. There's also an Eclipse plugin for it.


6

We use Serna XML Editor Eclipse (plain xml editing, mostly used by the technical people) own specific Eclipse plug-in (just for our release-notes) Maven docbkx plug-in Maven jar with specific corporate style sheet, based on the standard docbook style-sheets Maven plug-in for converting csv to DocBook table Maven plug-in for extracting BugZilla data and ...


6

For HTML output, I use the Docbook XSL stylesheets with the XSLT processor xsltproc. For PDF output, I use dblatex, which translates to LaTeX and then use pdflatex to compile it to PDF. (I used Jade, the DSSSL stylesheets and jadetex before.)


6

LaTeX: is great for general formatting and for some specialties like special markup, equations, macros. But too many things to learn for begginers. I don't like docbook - too many tags, but it is better suited for more processing (or preprocessing) using other tools. I like to write documentation parts in ReStructuredText but it is probably too Python ...


6

With FOP you get the features that someone decided they wanted bad enough to implement. I'd say that no one who's serious about publishing uses it in production. You're far better off with RenderX or Antenna House or Arbortext. (I've used them all over the last decade's worth of implementation projects.) It depends on your business requirements, how much ...


6

Not sure, if this is exactly what you want / if it full fills your requirements, but I'm thinking of ENTITYs. You can define them at the top (of your XML document, so general XML, nothing DocBook specific). As seen here for the 'doc.release.number' and 'doc.release.date'. But they can also be included through an separate file. As seen in the 3th ENTITY row. ...


6

I stumbled into this error today after upgrading to OS X Lion recently. The reason you get the pdflatex: command not found error message is because Emacs is not including the texlive binaries into its PATH, so you have to add them manually. So, after having downloaded and install the most recent version of the Texlive distribution for OS X from here, ...


6

It was easy. I found this in titlepage.templates.xsl:<xsl:template name="book.titlepage.before.verso"> <fo:block xmlns:fo="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Format" break-after="page"/> </xsl:template> Aha! It is the template including page break, isn't? Waht happens, when I turn it to empty template? Et voilĂ , solution found:<!-- clear ...


6

There are several ways to script this, both using external scripts and scripts within OpenOffice. See the following links for some examples: http://juretta.com/log/2006/08/10/convert_microsoft_word_to_docbook_xml_using_ruby_and_openoffice/ http://www.oooninja.com/2008/02/batch-command-line-file-conversion-with.html http://www.xml.com/pub/a/2006/01/11/from-...



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