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110

Both are valuable. I use both doctest and a further unit testing framework (nose) taking the place of unittest. I use doctest for cases where the test is giving an example of usage that is actually useful as documentation. Generally I don't make these tests comprehensive, aiming solely for informative. I'm effectively using doctest in reverse: not to ...


36

I use unittest almost exclusively. Once in a while, I'll put some stuff in a docstring that's usable by doctest. 95% of the test cases are unittest. Why? I like keeping docstrings somewhat shorter and more to the point. Sometimes test cases help clarify a docstring. Most of the time, the application's test cases are too long for a docstring.


30

Yes. You can do it. The doctest module documentation and Wikipedia has an example of it. >>> x Traceback (most recent call last): ... NameError: name 'x' is not defined


24

With doctest.ELLIPSIS, you can use ... to mean "match any string here". You can set doctest options with a doctest directive, to make it active for just one test case: one example in the online docs is: >>> print range(20) # doctest:+ELLIPSIS [0, 1, ..., 18, 19] If you want a doctest option to be active throughout, you can pass it as the ...


22

Instead of instantiating the object in every method, you could do something like this: class Test: def multiply_by_2(self): """ >>> t.multiply_by_2() 10 """ return self._number*2 if __name__ == "__main__": import doctest doctest.testmod(extraglobs={'t': Test()})


17

You can do this by adding/editing the suite() function in tests.py which defines what tests will be run by the django test runner. import unittest import doctest from project import views def suite(): suite = unittest.TestSuite() suite.addTest(doctest.DocTestSuite(views)) return suite Then just run your tests as usual and you should see your ...


15

Another advantage of doctesting is that you get to make sure your code does what your documentation says it does. After a while, software changes can make your documentation and code do different things. :-)


14

As your project grows, you'll find that unittests are far better for testing your code. The Django project itself is in the process of converting all doctests to unittests (we'll be done by the 1.3 release). The reason we're doing this is that prior to this conversion, the order of execution in the test suite would sometimes cause hard to reproduce errors. ...


13

You're missing the code to actually run the doctests at the bottom of the file: class Test: <snip> if __name__ == "__main__": import doctest doctest.testmod() As for where to put the tests: If it's testing the class as a whole, I'd put them in the class' docstring. If it's testing the constructor, I'd put them in the constructor's ...


12

I (ab)used doctest in lieu of unittest, back when I started my gmpy project many years ago -- you can browse its sources and see that all the functionality is thoroughly tested with doctests (the functionality's supplied by a C-coded Python extension, and last time I instrumented it for coverage measurement I was over 95% coverage). Why did I do that? ...


11

feel free to disabuse me of this preference if it is misinformed I believe I used doctest more extensively (way stretching its intended use boundaries) than any other open source developer, at least within a single project -- all the tests in my gmpy project are doctests. It was brand new at the time gmpy was starting, it seemed a great little trick, ...


11

I work as a bioinformatician, and most of the code I write is "one time, one task" scripts, code that will be run only once or twice and that execute a single specific task. In this situation, writing big unittests may be overkill, and doctests are an useful compromise. They are quicker to write, and since they are usually incorporated in the code, they ...


10

If you're just getting started with the idea of unit testing, I would start with doctest because it is so simple to use. It also naturally provides some level of documentation. And for more comprehensive testing with doctest, you can place tests in an external file so it doesn't clutter up your documentation. I would suggest unittest if you're coming from a ...


10

If you want unicode strings, you have to use unicode docstrings! Mind the u! # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- def mylen(word): u""" <----- SEE 'u' HERE >>> mylen(u"áéíóú") 5 """ return len(word) print mylen(u"áéíóú") This will work -- as long as the tests pass. For Python 2.x you need yet another hack to make verbose doctest mode work ...


9

I happen to prefer unittests, but both are excellent and well developed methods of testing, and both are well-supported by Django (see here for details). In short, there are some key advantages and disadvantages to each: Pros of unittests unittests allows for easy creation of more complicated tests. If you have a test that involves calling multiple helper ...


9

I've gotten this to work using literal string notation for the docstring: def join_with_tab(iterable): r""" >>> join_with_tab(['1', '2']) '1\t2' """ return '\t'.join(iterable) if __name__ == "__main__": import doctest doctest.testmod()


9

I can't get the point of Ian Bicking's package, doctestjs. He just provides us a different way of writing normal external tests, not real doctests. I use a lot python doctests, they are quite important for me, I don't know what doctestjs could be useful for, but I found some true doctests implemented with this project: ...


9

Each function object has a code object which stores the first line number, so you can use: import inspect ordered = sorted(inspect.getmembers(moduleobj, inspect.isfunction), key=lambda kv: kv[1].__code__.co_firstlineno) to get a sorted list of (name, function) pairs. For Python 2.5 and older, you'll need to use .func_code instead of ...


8

The Python interpreter ignores None return values, so doctests do the same. Test for is None instead: >>> six_or_none(4) is None True


8

Put <BLANKLINE> in the expected output just like it shows in the error message. Then the test should work just fine. The expected input terminates at the first whitespace only line which is why you have to mark it specially: >>> data_lists=[ {"Average execution" : [1, 2, 3, 2, 3]}, ... {"Top execution" : [3, ...


8

I think you want to use ellipsis, like this: >>> get_session('Mmusc20090126', False, True) #doctest: +ELLIPSIS <sqlalchemy.orm.session.Session object at 0x...> See here for more info.


7

Only if you provide a way to extract the inner function object itself, e.g. def outerfunc(calltheinner=True): def innerfunc(): do_something() if calltheinner: return innerfunc() else: return innerfunc If your outer function insists on hiding the inner one entirely inside itself (never letting it percolate outside when ...


7

Try the --exe flag: $ nosetests --help ... --exe Look for tests in python modules that are executable. Normal behavior is to exclude executable modules, since they may not be import-safe [NOSE_INCLUDE_EXE]


7

You've got an extra space after the 97 - if you remove it, your test should run fine.


7

This is my tests/__init__.py implementation, based on Jesse Shieh answer: import doctest import unittest list_of_doctests = [ 'myapp.views.myview', 'myapp.forms.myform', ] list_of_unittests = [ 'sometestshere', # This file is myapp/tests/sometestshere.py 'moretestshere', # This file is myapp/tests/moretestshere.py ...


7

You could escape all of the backslashes, or alternatively change your docstring to a raw string literal: def do_something_with_hex(c): r""" >>> do_something_with_hex('\x00') '\x00' """ return repr(c) With the r prefix on the string a character following a backslash is included in the string without change, and all backslashes ...


7

Try it out in the interpreter; it uses ... to show continuation lines. >>> is only for a new statement or expression, while a class in incomplete until you've had an empty ... continuation line: >>> class A(MyClass): ... def __init__(self): ... super(A, self).__init__() ...


7

Just figured out: def long_string(): """ Returns a string which is wider than the recommended PEP8 linewidth >>> print long_string() 01234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890\ 12345678901234567890123456789 """ return '0123456789' * 10 Hope that helps somebody else out.


6

I ended up using this. Hacky, but it works. >>> p = my_function() >>> {'this': 'is', 'a': 'dictionary'} == p True


6

Things have changed in Django 1.6: Doctests will no longer be automatically discovered. To integrate doctests in your test suite, follow the recommendations in the Python documentation. So all I had to do myself was (in my_app/tests.py): import unittest import doctest from my_app import views def load_tests(loader, tests, ignore): ...



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