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49

The typical context I see for Raven DB is a web site or single-focused web application with mostly CRUD pages, possibly with lots of fields of a dynamic/optional nature, and a particular need for scalability. I don't see it well suited for software that needs advanced reporting or data analysis features or as a central database with two or more very ...


29

Are document-oriented databases have been developed to be the next generation of databases and basically replace relational databases completely? No. Document-oriented databases (like MongoDB) are very good at the type of tasks that we typically see in modern web sites (fast look-ups of individual items or small sets of items). But they make some big ...


20

I would say the biggest draw back is the licensing and the fact you can only use C# for it. I'm a big fan of C# but when you're building apps for the web things change very fast. So you never know what the hell your going to be coding in the next 5yrs. The licensing is really the killer here. Its only free when you use it with an open source project. If ...


17

I'll just call out one or two common reasons (I'm sure people will be writing essay answers) With highly distributed systems, any given data set may be spread across multiple servers. When that happens, the relational constraints which the DB engine can guarantee are greatly reduced. Some of your referential integrity will need to be handled in ...


14

I think this post will be right for you http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Schema+Design Use Cases Customer / Order / Order Line-Item Orders should be a collection. customers a collection. line-items should be an array of line-items embedded in the order object. Blogging system. Posts should be a collection. post author might be a separate ...


11

I think, after perusing about on a couple of pages on this subject, it all depends upon the types of data you are dealing with. RDBMSes represent a top-down approach, where you, the database designer, assert the structure of all data that will exist in the database. You define that a Person has a First,Last,Middle Name and a Home Address, etc. You can ...


11

Firstly I'd like to say that you are very correct in saying that NoSql is diffrent from Relational Databases and so its hard to make a comparison. With that being said there are many big distinctions between the two that can be compared. Scaling Although you can shard a MySql database there are issues with sharding and enforcing ACID properties when a RDMS ...


10

I cannot recomend it enough. We're using it for sonatribe. we use the replication and versioning bundles as well as the security bundle. it's absolutely great and we get 1st class support from the raven tools guys.


9

Currently I've added AuthorId property to blog post entity. Is that the right approach to store relation between objects? I'd say no. You are "supposed" to store everything you need in a blog document in a denormalized way (e.g. the blog post, the comments, the tags, etc). So if you want to show the Author's name, you should add it to the blog document. ...


9

One very nice feature, for me, is to use it as an easy data-store for a standalone client application. You could save your data to xml, file, or something like SQLite (possibly with NHibernate), but nothing compares to the ease-of-use with RavenDb. If you construct your classes well, with aggregates and a domain-driven approach, you can just pass your ...


9

It's all about the data. If you have data which makes most sense relationally, a document store may not be useful. A typical document based system is a search server, you have a huge data set and want to find a specific item/document, the document is static, or versioned. In an archive type situation, the documents might literally be documents, that don't ...


8

There are several people in the process of deploying RavenDB, see the discussion thread here for more info.


8

Solr individual fields update About reindexing all on schema change: Solr does not support updating individual fields yet, but there is a JIRA issue about this that's still unresolved. However, how many times do you change schema? MongoDB If you can live without a RDBMS (without joins, schema, transactions, foreign key constrains), a document-based DB ...


7

Map: function(doc) { switch (doc.type) { case "idea": emit(doc._id, ["idea", doc]); break; case "rating": emit(doc.idea_id, ["rating", doc.rating]); break; } } Reduce: function(keys, values, rereduce) { var i, l, ret = {idea:null, rating:0}; for (i = 0, l = values.length; i < l; ++i) { switch ...


7

Disclaimer: I didn't test this and don't know if it can perform better. Create a single perm view: function(doc) { for (var tag in doc.tags) { emit([tag, doc.published], doc) } }; And query with _view/your_view/all?startkey=['your_tag_here']&endkey=['your_tag_here', {}] Resulting JSON structure will be slightly different but you will ...


6

The primary concern should be what do you need to do with your data. If you have a huge data set and are finding a traditional RDBMS to be a bottleneck then you may want to experiment with a schemaless or a a NOSQL solution. Most environments that I am aware of using NOSQL solutions also use an RDBMS solution in some form or fashion. RDBMS based solutions ...


5

Well it depends how your data is structured and on the data-access-patterns. Document databases store and retrieve documents and basic atomic stored unit is a document. As you said, you need to think about your data-access patterns / use-cases to create a smart document-model. When your domain model can be split and partitioned across some documents, a ...


5

In CouchDB, like Lotus Notes, you really shouldn't think about a Document as being analogous to a row. Instead, a Document is a relation (table). Each document has a number of rows--the field values: ValueID(PK) Document ID(FK) Field Name Field Value ======================================================== 92834756293 MyDocument First ...


5

This is really a question of fitness for purpose. If you want to be able to join some tables together and return a filtered set of results, you can only do that with a relational database. If you want mind-bending performance and have incredible volumes of data, that's when column-family or document-oriented databases come into their own. This is a classic ...


4

I enjoyed listening to the floss weekly episode about CouchDB. Lots of reasoning and ideas there. Prior to listening, most of the stuff I read about this topic triggered not much insight (for me). Listening to people talking and reasoning about why&where you want to use document-oriented DBs helped me a lot to really get the concepts, reasoning, pros ...


4

A very simple solution would be PStore from Ruby's Standard Library. It should meet almost all your requirements: PStore stores Ruby object hierarchies in files, so you can easily use the Hash-like structures, you would have in CouchDB You can access the contents of the PStore with a simple API It has transactions, but no versions as far as I know yes You ...


4

Document-oriented databases do not reject the concept of relations, they just sometimes let applications dereference the links (CouchDB) or even have direct support for relations between documents (MongoDB). What's more important is that DODBs are schema-less. In table-based storages this property can be achieved with significant overhead (see answer by ...


4

Jan Lehnardt recently wrote up a useful overview of data modeling (I would not quite call it "schema" design as you correctly point out). http://blog.couchbase.com/document-modeling-rules-thumb


4

I'm totally new to document-oriented databases, and right now I'm trying to develop sort of a CMS using node.js and mongodb so I'm facing the same problems as you. By trial and error I found this rule of thumb: I make a collection for every entity that may be a "subject" for my queries, while embedding the rest inside other objects. For example, comments ...


4

You originally asked this question for graph databases (like Neo4j). That's why I'd like to add some notes. Graph databases use integrated indexing for nodes (and relationships) so the fast initial lookup for the root nodes of your documents is done via that (external or in graph indexes) Additional in graph indexes for paths (actually trees to the root) ...


4

Have you tried? result = list(db.collection.find())


3

With my number 1 concern above, about shared hosting environments, it seems that the server can be embedded with the application. I haven't yet found out about running it in less than full trust.


3

Refactoring here implies that there's a deterministic mapping from the old schema to the new schema. So the most effective option is to do the same thing you'd do with a SQL database and actually update the documents. Document-Oriented Databases do give you one other option, although it depends on which DODB and how you're using it on the front-end. That ...


3

Your data seems ideal for document oriented databases. Document example: { "type":"Album", "artist":"ArtistName", "album_name":"AlbumName", "songs" : [ {"title":"SongTitle","duration":4.5} ], "genres":["rock","indie"] } And replication is one of couchDB coolest features ( http://blog.couch.io/post/468392274/whats-new-in-apache-couchdb-0-11-part-three-new ...


3

You can define a single permanent view, as Bahadir suggests. when doing this sort of indexing, though, don't output the doc for each key. Instead, emit([tag, doc.published], null). In current release versions you'd then have to do a separate lookup for each doc, but SVN trunk now has support for specifying "include_docs=True" in the query string and CouchDB ...



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