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Just change $(document).ready(function(e) { showViewportSize(); }); $(window).resize(function(e) { showViewportSize(); }); to $(document).ready(showViewportSize); $(window).resize(showViewportSize); The way you originally did it defined two separate anonymous functions which both call showViewportSize(). The way I changed it to calls ...


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You may have misunderstood each other. The snippet you've given is, for the most part, a JS way to declare a class. Of course, for the sole purpose of executing a bunch of code on ready event this is overkill. But the project grows and you need to structure it. This is one of the many ways to do that, of which none is the best one. This one is familiar to ...


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What they want to achieve with that it's an 'application bootstraper' or 'start button' and when the page is ready they call the Constructor but a more suitable name is init or initialize method. In my opinion this is an absolutly crappy way for an application foundation/structure. This can be also used as a module starter etc. Using _this as a reference ...


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One big difference is the pollution of the global scope. Since they don't appear to be wrapping their functions in an IIFE, all of the functions and variables will be accessible from the global scope. This could could lead to bugs and security issues if 3rd party JS libs (or even some other internal code) reused any of those. The approach you mentioned is a ...


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There is no special meaning to the word Constructor in the JavaScript language; only what meanings your coworkers have been assigning to it. Some JS frameworks like dojo create similarly named functions, but they also have specialized, central ways of defining objects, and centralized places they call said constructor function (instead of manually calling it ...


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The approach you have shown is overly complicated. I've never seen an alias set up for this unless you needed access to it in a closure. Something to this effect in a completely different circumstance. var self = this; Also, the _ notation is typically used to denote privacy. I've heard some JS experts say that this is a cheap trick for not actually ...


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IIFEs are an ideal solution for locally scoping global variables/properties and protecting your JavaScript codebase from outside interference (e.g. third-party libraries). If you are writing jQuery code that will be run in many different environments (e.g. jQuery plugins), then it is important to use an IIFE to locally scope jQuery. You can’t assume ...


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Wrapping the functions in $(document).ready automatically takes care of this concern. From the JQuery documentation on document.ready. A page can't be manipulated safely until the document is "ready." jQuery detects this state of readiness for you. Code included inside $( document ).ready() will only run once the page Document Object Model (DOM) ...


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It`s good practise to locate all the JS files in the end of the body <html> <head></head> <body> ... Some HTML <script>SomeScripts</script> </body> </html> </pre> If you want to be sure that your external scripts are loaded after page load use: $(function(){ /* Your code from ...


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You can change the content of footer.php to include /nameOfExternalJsFile.js manually at the bottom of the page. That´s the safest way to do it because you may load jquery before loading others scripts.


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You should load the $(document).ready(...) stuff only after you have loaded jQuery, that is, in the footer file, after the jQuery <script> tag, like this : <script src="includes/js/jQuery.min.js"></script> <script src="includes/js/nameOfExternalJsFile.js"></script>


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Aside from any differences in how they determine if the document is ready. It is worth noting that dojo/ready integrates with other dojo infrastructure such as the parser and AMD loader, so that it can fire after all required widgets have been parsed, modules loaded, etc.. Dojo < 1.7 dojo.ready waits for dojo.require calls and the parser if parseOnLoad ...


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Ok, so I figured out what was wrong. It turns out that my css actually had the .less extension so it was getting parsed by less.js for roughly 16ms which delayed the initial styles past the point where firefox was executing the $(document).ready(). Changing it to .css fixed the problem. Sorry I didn't catch that when posting my question and code, thanks for ...


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The setTimeout isn't necessary for the first group of divs since it's a 0 ms timeout. That's what's causing the blinking. Also, you should wrap your setTimeout around the (function, rather than the var divs instantiation. This could unnecessary cause latency. I created a JSFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/richardgirges/noq2f5ox/2/ JS Code: ...


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You probably need to remove that 0ms timeout and/or hide the elements via CSS instead of a call to .hide. That way they are hidden by default on page load. CSS: div.my-divs { display: none; }



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