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232

The shorthand is: $(function() { // Code here });


113

The shorthand for $(document).ready(handler) is $(handler) (where handler is a function). See here. The code in your question has nothing to do with .ready(). Rather, it is a self-invoking anonymous function with the jQuery object as its argument. Its purpose is to restrict the scope of at least the $ variable to its own block so it doesn't cause conflicts. ...


61

Is $(document).ready necessary? no if you've placed all your scripts right before the </body> closing tag, you've done the exact same thing. Additionally, if the script doesn't need to access the DOM, it won't matter where it's loaded beyond possible dependencies on other scripts. For many CMS's, you don't have much choice of where the scripts ...


45

It depends on how your $('site-header') is constructed. You can try to use $timeout with 0 delay. Something like: return function(scope, element, attrs) { $timeout(function(){ $('.main').height( $('.site-header').height() - $('.site-footer').height() ); }); } Explanations how it works: one, two.


35

In simple words, $(document).ready is an event which fires up when document is ready. Suppose you have placed your jQuery code in head section and trying to access a dom element (an anchor, an img etc), you will not be able to access it because html is interpreted from top to bottom and your html elements are not present when your jQuery code runs. ...


29

The correct shorthand is this: $(function() { // this behaves as if within document.ready }); (function($){ //some code })(jQuery); The code you posted creates an anonymous function and executes it immediately with jQuery being passed in as the arg $. All it effectively does is take the code inside the function and execute it like normal, since ...


20

They are the same. Check out the jQuery .ready() docs. Here's a quote from the docs: All three of the following syntaxes are equivalent: $(document).ready(handler) $().ready(handler) (this is not recommended) $(handler)


18

Yes, they will both get fired. In the way they appear (top to bottom), because the ready event will be fired once, and all the event listeners will get notified one after another. It is OK to do it like that. If you can have them in the same block code it would be easier to manage, but that's all there is to it. Update: Apparently I forgot to mention, you ...


17

The ready event cannot fire twice. What is more than likely happening is you have code that is moving or manipulating the element that the code is contained within which causes the browser to re-execute the script block. This can be avoided by including script tags in the <head> or before the closing </body> tag and not using ...


15

If you look at the jQuery UI documentation, let's take tabs for example, if you look at the Theming tab, you can see the classes to apply to avoid the flash of unstyled content: <div class="ui-tabs ui-widget ui-widget-content ui-corner-all" id="tabs"> <ul class="ui-tabs-nav ui-helper-reset ui-helper-clearfix ui-widget-header ui-corner-all"> ...


12

This is not a shorthand for $(document).ready(). The code you posted boxes the inside code and makes jQuery available as $ without polluting the global namespace. This can be used when you want to use both prototype and jQuery on one page. Documented here: ...


10

This is the technique I use. It allows me to sprinkle $(document).ready() style calls wherever I like. Using this method, you can take a site that already uses jQuery and has existing $(document).ready() calls, and easily retrofit yepnope. First, add this line of JS, preferably in the document head, before any javascript that calls $(document).ready(): ...


10

If load jQuery without yepnope isn't a problem for you, there is a easier way to do. <script type="text/javascript" src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script> <script> $.holdReady(true); yepnope.load({ load: [ 'placeholder.js', 'jquery-ui.min.js' ], ...


10

document.ready() callbacks are called in the order they were registered. If you register your testing callback first, it will be called first. Also if your testing code does not actually need to manipulate the DOM, then you may be able to run it as the code is parsed and not wait until the DOM is ready which would run before the other document.ready() ...


9

I believe I've found the reason and created a reasonably good fix. When jQuery creates the dialog, it moves the DIV that contains the contents of the dialog around in the DOM (to the very end of the document) and surrounds that div with the necessary scaffolding that a dialog requires (probably by using the .append() function or something similar). Because ...


8

I ran into a similar issue with both FF4 and Chrome. jQuery(document).ready wasn't working. I was able to get it working with jQuery(window).load. I'm not sure what changed in FF4, but they seemed to have made it more similar to how Chrome does things. When I changed it to use jQuery(window).load, it also cleared up issues I was having in Chrome.


7

here is how you would go about doing it: // lower priority value means function should be called first var method_queue = new Array(); method_queue.push({ method : function() { alert('Hello World 1'); }, priority : 2 }); method_queue.push({ method : function() { alert('Hello World 2'); }, priority : 1 }); function sort_queue(a, ...


7

No, if your javascript is the last thing before close you won't need to add those tags. As a side note, a shorthand for $(document).ready is the code below. $(function() { // do something on document ready }); This question might be good. Did you read it? jQuery: Why use document.ready if external JS at bottom of page?


7

This works fine and is an acceptable practice. After all, as you describe, there may be cases where the logic in the $(window).load() handler depends on work taking place after the DOM is ready. If the window is in fact already loaded by the time you set up $(window).load(), the handler will just fire immediately.


7

These specific lines are the usual wrapper for jQuery plugins: "...to make sure that your plugin doesn't collide with other libraries that might use the dollar sign, it's a best practice to pass jQuery to a self executing function (closure) that maps it to the dollar sign so it can't be overwritten by another library in the scope of its execution." ...


7

See here: jQuery - is it bad to have multiple $(document).ready(function() {}); and here: Tutorials:Multiple $(document).ready() Yes Order of attach. jQuery internally maintains a readyList with Deferred objects. It's partially a matter of taste. Having one ready handler will give you a nice overview of all that is happening, while multiple (i.e., one per ...


6

They are just added as event handlers to the documents 'ready' event (an abstracted event provided by JQuery). In JQuery event handlers are executed in the order they were bound. Eventhandlers are not chained - as that would mean handler#3 would not fire if handler#2 failed to execute successfully. They are simply executed by the event manager in turn.


6

While it is not perfectly clear what you are trying to do, I will try my MagicGuess tool and offer you an answer. So, you need to a) perform some functionality on document load; this functionality does something with all .do-tip elements on the page b) perform the same functionality after you load something via AJAX, but now this needs to operate with ...


6

There are no differences, and the docs don't show any difference: All three of the following syntaxes are equivalent: $(document).ready(handler) $().ready(handler) (this is not recommended) $(handler) Straight from: http://api.jquery.com/ready/ I think you are confused by the example showing jQuery(function($){ ... }); Which is just a ...


6

This happened to me when using KendoUI... invoking a popup window would cause the document.ready event to fire multiple times. The easy solution is to set a global flag so that it only runs once: var pageInitialized = false; $(function() { if(pageInitialized) return; pageInitialized = true; // Put your init logic here. }); It's sort of ...


6

Related: This article can also be found as a part of my blog HERE. Solution First off all you need to understand jQM page events and their flow . $(document).on('pageinit',function(){ $.mobile.loading( 'show' ); }); is indeed a replacement for: $(document).ready(function () { $.mobile.loading('show'); }); but jQM page consists from few ...


6

To answer your question: No, document.ready will not fire again once a ajax request is completed. (The content in the ajax is loaded into your document, so there isn't a second document for the ajax content). To solve your problem just add the event listener to the Element where you load the ajax content into it. For example: $( "div.ajaxcontent-container" ...


6

Probably the author won't need my answer anymore. Still, for sake of completeness i feel other users might find it useful. The best and most simple solution is to use $(window).load() inside the body of the returned function. (alternatively you can use document.ready. It really depends if you need all the images or not). Using $timeout in my humble opinion ...


5

Javascript loading and execution is serialized by the browser (unless you use something like head.js), but the problem is that the DOM has to be available for a script to modify it. The jQuery ready event fires after the DOM is available, so the browser has already started requesting the resources that were referenced in the HTML. So if you put the ...


5

When you use old-style DOM0 handler hookup (onclick="..."), any functions you reference in that string must be globals. Your delRow function isn't a global, it's contained by the function you're passing into ready — which is a good thing, the global namespace is already too full. Two choices for dealing with this: 1. Hook things up with jQuery ...



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